Beast POV with new brakes

Monday, April 15, 2002 8:39 PM

Was that camera actually being held? I kind of got the idea that it was mounted on the train because it looks like it tipped over on it's side towards the end of the movie and I couldn't see anybody in the seat.

It looks like a much better quality video than just a hand held taping. I took my video camera (Sony DCTRV-320) on Top Gun at PKI and rode front seat and the outcome was awful. I really thought I was holding it as still as I humanly could too.

I know now that I'll never do that again either plain and simply because I do not want to lose an expensive peice of equipment like that over a roller coaster. Now if I actually had some way of safely securing my camera into the car with me, I'd do it in a second. (with park permission of course)

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Pearl Jam + Roller Coasters = Heaven on Earth.

*** This post was edited by Joey Stewart on 4/16/2002. ***

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Monday, April 15, 2002 11:52 PM
This reminds me. I remember hearing a few years back about somone taking a camera on the Beast and losing it. The camera hit someone in the face and when the train returned to the station, the person was bleeding really bad. Anyone else know of this?
-Matt.
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Monday, April 15, 2002 11:56 PM
Oh my gosh! A Beast POV! I'm in heaven! I've been searching for a POV of Beast since I rode it in 2000! I also love having a T1 line! I got it in under 5 minutes! Sweet! I LOVE YOU, BEAST! Wow!!! Too bad it's not a FULL POV. What happened to the stuff after the second tunnel? Cry. Eh, I think this video's amazing. I can't wait to ride it again this summer!!!

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I was asked to describe X in one word. The word? -- OhmygoshwhathaveIgottenmyselfintothisisthescariest
thingintheworldhelpmeIamgoingtodieAHHHH!!!

*** This post was edited by haux on 4/16/2002. ***

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 12:18 AM
Wow, that just looks weird without the skids. It's a shame they can't just get rid of all the trims. Where are the magnetic brakes? All I noticed was what I thought were pinch brakes.
-Matt.
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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 12:29 AM

Wow, that footage really makes me want to buy a camera like yours. That was better quality than the Sony Digital 8mm that I used to have !! Nice to revisit the Beast too. I've only been to PKI twice. The first time was over 10 years ago, and the 2nd time, last summer, I only had time to ride the newer rides (Drop Zone, SoB, FoF, etc...). Thanks ! :)

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Current favorite coasters:
Wooden: 1) Beast 2) Raven 3) Son of Beast 4) The Boss 5) Timber Wolf
Steel: 1) Raging Bull 2) Millennium Force 3) V2 4) Wild Thing 5) Mr. Freeze
Visit: http://www.dynamicgroove.com

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 12:22 PM

First off,

Dan, that is cool footage and your camera did a terrific job filming it.

Secondly,

I am not so sure it was a wise thing to have filmed the coaster. Especially if you did so without the park's permission.

I agree with Beast Boy's statement that you should not have used the camera while on the coaster. I know that the park did not have designated film time this weekend as I was at the park and spent a good amount of time with the marketing reps. Also, the ride ops are not allowed to grant permission to film or take pictures while riding.

For those of you that were quick to jump on Beast Boy's reminder of the rules, lets take a look at a few things here. Rules on rides and at parks exist for certain reasons. Mainly safety. Beast has signs plastered in several places reminding those with loose articles that they should be secured or put away.

Even we seasoned coaster riders cannot predict what factors may impair our ability to hold a loose item etc. In today's highly safety concious world, it is imperative that enthusiasts set and maintain proper riding procedures. This bucking the rules trend needs to stop before future rides are penalized. There is a bevy of public officials waiting and hoping for such accidents to happen allowing them to furthur restrict what rides are at parks, or how fast we go on them etc.

Now, in no way do I think that Dan had any ill intent by filming that. Just the opposite actually. I think he probably thought that many here would like to see a POV of the "new" Beast. However, it really should not have been done. He ignored the safety rules which is not the wisest thing to do.

Now, before I get blasted for "assuming" that he did not have permission, let me point out that the footage does not include the areas of the ride that are monitored by safety cameras... the lifts. Pretty ironic that no filming was done, or it was at least edited, in the areas of the ride where the rider could get caught doing so.

To blame the crew for not doing their job is ridiculous and insulting. The crew is not a scapegoat, nor are they to blame for a riders wrongdoings. A rule is a rule irregardless of whether or not the person breaking it gets caught. It's wrong, plain and simple.

Ride ops do an incredible job of maintaning the safety of the passengers. Had the crew been able to see the video camera being used to film, which more than likely was hidden from view on the lifts cameras, they would have stopped the lift and told the rider to put it away. Ride ops climb lifts often to retrieve loose articles such as this to ensure a safe ride.

Someday, I will tell my "Do not hold hands up" story. For now I will just explain the following: Having been a member of the Beast crew and various other coaster crews, I see the necessity for enforcing those rules. Especially in the coaster entusiast community.

Lets be smart people. And only do things which we have permission to do that do not jepordize the safety of those around us.... oh, and ourselves.

Dan, please do not take any of this personally. I am not at all trying to single you out. And if anything I am glad this topic has come up. We need to talk more about setting an example as enthusiasts. When it comes to our park mentalities and safe ride procedures, we should be first to abide by the rules and safety warnings.

Finally, Peabody asked about what seemed to be "proxy switches" near the entrance to the helix tunnel. Actually those are new specially designed "C" clamps that bind the now split tie rods together. Unlike with skids, the trains now require a fin on the bottom. If the old tie rods were there (a tie rod is a long threaded steel rode that is threaded through each side of the track and bolted in order to keep the train's inertia from seperating the sides), then the fin would have hit them. This new "C" clamp allows the track sides to be held together by two shorter tie rods threaded into it. The fin passes through the "c" unobstructed.

Also, someone asked about the trims looking like pinch brakes. Indeed they do, but are, in fact, magnetic. The pinch brakes in station and magnetic trims along the course both operate using the same steel fin on the trains.

Shaggy

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Shaggy
A.K.A. John K.

*** This post was edited by Shaggy on 4/16/2002. ***

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 12:24 PM
Thanks for clearing up my question Shaggy! That's very interesting. It's nice to see how many coasters have gotten some well deserved TLC this year!

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- Peabody

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 1:06 PM

All I am going to say is that I knew what i was doing. Was it the right thing to do? No. Did I have permission? No. The camera strap was firmly wrapped around my wrist and I was holding the camera with both hands. I know the danger, I just love shooting film and now slowly getting into editing video. I remember at the MF media day there was a female reporter who brought her digital camera on the ride and she lost it on the first drop. I remember one of the Intamin guys running out and getting it and the lady was almost in tears when he handed her the pile of broken parts. I would have taped the entire ride but with my camera I can only shoot 40 seconds of video at a time.

You live and you learn. The key is to follow up on your learning. To those of you on the Beast crew or any other crew I know exactly how you feel. For that I'm sorry.

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Danny J
magnum count :2166

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 1:19 PM

I have wondered at times how close parks were to pulling/contacting individuals whom had taken pictures/videos without their approval. I am sure there are legal procedures which would afford fairly wide latitudes when it came to people making public said pictures/videos. Sure, parks do not want to look like heavies. Especially if it were in connection to a popular enthusiasts actions.

Have just wondered about this over the years.

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 2:01 PM
Just to let you know that at PKI if you take pictures on rides or violate any other posted or verbal rule you can be found guilty of a minor misdeameanor on the first offense and a 4th degree misdeameanor on the second offense under ORC 1711.551 which states all guest must follow safe conduct rules, rather verbal or posted.
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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 2:07 PM

It's my understanding that there isn't a rule against taking pictures. The rule is against the carrying of lose articles, correct?

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http://www.PKIGuide.com

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 2:13 PM

I didn't realize that the 885 took video. I was looking into getting one, but I never noticed that feature. I've never had a digital camera before, but I'm kinda into photography (well a little more than kinda if you count video considering I'm a film major). I assume this is a good camera?

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-Bob (formerly Coaster Jedi)
Knott's Berry Farm Cuba ~South Park
"Your proctologist called, he found your head!" ~Jerry "The King" Lawler

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 4:54 PM

Jacob,

Actually, there are signs stating that picture taking is prohibited while riding.

Some parks have very relaxed policies. SFMM, SFOT, Knoebels, Disney, and Jazzland (among others) have very relaxed photo policies. I myself have shot loads of on ride video at those parks.

Some parks state the rule before hand, but will still allow cameras if asked. Some parks are very strict and will throw guests out if they catch them shooting footage. I even know of one park that will threaten to throw you out if you shoot video ANYWHERE in the park, but that's been discussed before.

-Sean

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 5:30 PM
Ok, I've downloaded the movie, but how do I get it to play. Like it says done from downloading, but it's just a white page. Can someone please help me with this? Thanks.
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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 5:58 PM

well it may be a stupid question, but you do have the lastest version of Quick Time, don't you? if so then everything should be fine. try right clicking on the link and hitting Save Target As and then putting it somewhere on your hard drive. then just find the file and open it up and QT should play it just fine.

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-Bob (formerly Coaster Jedi)
Knott's Berry Farm Cuba ~South Park
"Your proctologist called, he found your head!" ~Jerry "The King" Lawler

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Wednesday, April 17, 2002 7:03 AM

Shaggy said:
"Now, before I get blasted for "assuming" that he did not have permission, let me point out that the footage does not include the areas of the ride that are monitored by safety cameras... the lifts. Pretty ironic that no filming was done, or it was at least edited, in the areas of the ride where the rider could get caught doing so.

To blame the crew for not doing their job is ridiculous and insulting. The crew is not a scapegoat, nor are they to blame for a riders wrongdoings. A rule is a rule irregardless of whether or not the person breaking it gets caught. It's wrong, plain and simple.

Ride ops do an incredible job of maintaning the safety of the passengers. Had the crew been able to see the video camera being used to film, which more than likely was hidden from view on the lifts cameras, they would have stopped the lift and told the rider to put it away. Ride ops climb lifts often to retrieve loose articles such as this to ensure a safe ride."


Funny, I have a very nice picture taken on the second lift of the Beast. I guess they weren't looking at the video screen at the time. Perhaps they were chasing down a stray basketball...
lata,
jeremy
--who reiterates you can do anything you want as long as you are willing to accept the consequences.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2002 7:24 AM

I am going to go out on a huge limb here and say that on-ride photo-taking rules are designed for the GP, not enthusiasts.

I'm sure that Dan has ridden the Beast dozens of times, and has the layout memorized like most of us do. He secured his camera, and no surprising jolt is going to make him drop it. He knows what to expect.

This is different that the guy who has never ridden before whipping out his point-and-shoot while going down a steep hill. He doesn't know what's next, his hands are sweaty and he could drop his camera easily.

I have taken on-ride pics on Magnum, Raptor, Mantis, Mean Streak, the Beast, King Cobra, Vortex, the Legend, Batman: The Ride, Colossus, Psyclone, Steel Phantom, Thunderbolt, Raging Wolf Bobs, Apollo's Chariot, Thunder Run, Twisted Sisters, Chang and Manhattan Express. All without permission, and most with an unsecured disposable camera. On other rides, even when I wasn't taking pictures, I still was gripping my camera in my upraised hand.

I guarantee that I will NEVER drop a camera on a ride. I just know the kinds of forces to expect and I won't get caught off guard.

Am I breaking the rules? Well, yes. If I ever get "caught," I won't fight it when they throw me out of the park. But I do think those rules aren't aimed at "experienced" coaster riders.

Those great on-ride shots are just too good to pass up the opportunity.

-Dennis ( who is not condoning his own attitude in this matter, just trying to be honest)

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He let the contents of the bottle do the thinking; can't shake the devil's hand and say you're only kidding.

*** This post was edited by Den on 4/17/2002. ***

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Wednesday, April 17, 2002 7:25 AM

2Hostyl said: I guess they weren't looking at the video screen at the time.

Or monitoring the guests in station, or monitoring a train on the brake run, or monitoring the ride ops, or taking capacity, or making no smoking spheels, or making riding procedure spheels, or monitoring kids in the kiddie corral, or reporting speeds to maintenance, or reporting concerns and or information to home base or......

Oh, you get the idea.... the driver has lots to do. It's a shame they have to babysit rulebreakers. People should adhere to the rules irregardless of consequences. Again, I take this stance because I have been there.

2Hostyl said: who reiterates you can do anything you want as long as you are willing to accept the consequences.

Personally, . I don't agree with that attitude. As a ride op you can tell someone something till your blue in the face, but by these standards you are just being a pest or spoilsport. 9 times out of 10 you get blamed when something goes wrong even though you did your job and warned the guest. I personally don't follow the logic of "Whatever feels good... do it.. But beware you may get caught." In a park setting I trust the advice of those in charge on what is or is not safe.

Again, I am not singling you out, but rather shedding light on my personal feelings... right as they are ;-)

Shaggy

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Shaggy
A.K.A. John K.

*** This post was edited by Shaggy on 4/17/2002. ***

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Wednesday, April 17, 2002 7:40 AM

Den,

So you are saying that park rules and safety guidelines only apply to regular guests and that enthusiasts are expempt?

That is one of the most ridiculous things I have ever heard or read!

I'm sure that Dan has ridden the Beast dozens of times, and has the layout memorized like most of us do. He secured his camera, and no surprising jolt is going to make him drop it. He knows what to expect.

Doesn't matter, something COULD go wrong and he would not be expecting it. I personally have ridden the Beast hundreds and hundreds of times. But guess what? I adhere to the rules no matter what. I secure all loose articles and I do not even consider taking pictures while riding it.

This is different that the guy who has never ridden before whipping out his point-and-shoot while going down a steep hill. He doesn't know what's next, his hands are sweaty and he could drop his camera easily.

Hoo Boy! So enthusiasts hands do not get sweaty or they are coordinated enough to be able to hang onto a loose article no matter what circumstance? That is flawed logic.

I have taken on-ride pics on Magnum, Raptor, Mantis, Mean Streak, the Beast, King Cobra, Vortex, the Legend, Batman: The Ride, Colossus, Psyclone, Steel Phantom, Thunderbolt, Raging Wolf Bobs, Apollo's Chariot, Thunder Run, Twisted Sisters, Chang and Manhattan Express. All without permission, and most with an unsecured disposable camera. On other rides, even when I wasn't taking pictures, I still was gripping my camera in my upraised hand.

Doesn't matter in my book. If you are asked not to do it, then you should honor that request.

I guarantee that I will NEVER drop a camera on a ride. I just know the kinds of forces to expect and I won't get caught off guard.

Guarantee huh? You're positive? 1000% certain that you would never drop a camera on a ride? No matter what? You always know what to expect? You will never get caught off guard? That is an amazingly strong satement. So, how are you so sure?

Am I breaking the rules? Well, yes. If I ever get "caught," I won't fight it when they throw me out of the park. But I do think those rules aren't aimed at "experienced" coaster riders.

I think they are more or less aimed SPECIFICALLY at "experienced" coaster riders.

Those great on-ride shots are just too good to pass up the opportunity.

Think so, huh? Worth any consequence?

Shaggy

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Shaggy
A.K.A. John K.

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Wednesday, April 17, 2002 7:58 AM

Shaggy said:

So you are saying that park rules and safety guidelines only apply to regular guests and that enthusiasts are expempt?

I was hoping this wouldn't be the first response, but I knew it would be. No, I don't think enthusiasts are exempt. I just think that they should be able to be trusted with more responsibility.

Say you get a new job. When you first start, no way they let you take the big bag of money to the bank - you might lose it. But as you gain experience, the chances of you losing it lessen, and sooner or later you're completely trusted to deposit the money with no supervision.

This attitude obviously applies to camera-carrying enthusiasts too; otherwise, cameras would not be allowed at ERT events. If enthusiasts are just as prone to dropping cameras as the GP, then why do parks sometimes allow cameras during ERT? Isn't that just as dangerous... or even MORE so since lots of people have cameras?

In my opinion, if taking a camera on a ride is the worst rule you ever break, or is the worst risk at which you put people around you, you're doing pretty good. I see too many dads smoking cigarettes in kids' faces and letting them roam around the back seat of the car going 70mph to think that I'm putting anyone at risk.

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He let the contents of the bottle do the thinking; can't shake the devil's hand and say you're only kidding.

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