Work being done on Timberwolf

Tuesday, August 1, 2006 11:39 AM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar You are the third person I've heard mention something about these sprinkler thingies. I have never seen these. What exactly is the deal with these things?

AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 11:42 AM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar DD, yes I realize that....hence, beefing up the structure (beyond what is required just to preserve the track with the trim on).

AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 1:00 PM
From what I understand, the problem has to do with their method of laying the track more than it has to do with the structure. Its easy to reinforce the structure or supply supplemental structure but fixing the track layering system they employed didn't seem to work. Almost every coaster that Summers/ Dinn designed and that CF now has ownership of, you can see their "fix" to the problem. The fix is bracing the track down to the structure using clamps. You can see it in this pic

http://rcdb.com/ig241.htm?picture=9

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 1:43 PM
The TW sprinklers were on July 1 during my visit. I too wonder what the deal is with those.
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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 2:19 PM
No, those metal clamps are actually steel track-ties used to hold the track *gauge* on the curves.

Kings Island did something similar on The Beast by just using long bolts run across between the rails, but those had to be modified to allow the brake fins to clear.

Of course, one of the reasons that gauging is a problem is that as the train blows through the curve, it isn't 'sticking' to the outside rail. It isn't sticking to the outside rail because it's moving too slowly for the curve. It's moving too slowly for the curve because of the brake on the first drop. The brake on the first drop is probably an attempt to slow it down and reduce the airtime on the first couple of hills...partly to keep from flinging riders out of the train, and partly to reduce the pummelling that the track gets when the train comes in for a landing.

It all comes down to the ride not running at the speeds it was designed to run at.

But then, what do I know? I'm no engineer; this is an educated guess, at best...

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 2:48 PM
how is that different from what i said? im not being a prick im just trying to understand.

The clamps are there to hold the layers of track together. Holding the layers of track together does two things:

  1. it maintains the integrity of the track
  2. It also maintains the track gauge as well
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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 2:56 PM
I Still Love TW it's my 2nd Fav only to OE of all time WOF coasters. I'll marathon TW for a new car anyone? Swoosh can you set that up with Nick maybe HaHa to promote the new tracking maybe HaHa?
I'll be down there August 10th. *** Edited 8/1/2006 7:28:16 PM UTC by TonyBlackjack***
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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 4:18 PM
The clamps have nothing to do with holding the layers together, and they do not attach the track to the ledgers.

The clamps are to hold the position of the rails relative to each other. The clever bit is that Cedar Fair's method (perhaps it's really more accurate to credit Martin & Vleminckx?) adds some adjustability. Because the cars cannot steer around the curve, there has to be a little bit of slop in order to keep the cars from binding on the curve. Of course, if the train were hugging the outside rail, it wouldn't make that much difference...but because the cars are ping-ponging back and forth, they adjust the track gauge so that hopefully there is enough slop for the train to pass, but not so much to allow the train to bounce around too much between the rails.

So that was my point...that the steel ties are there for holding the gauge, not for holding the track together or tying it to the ledgers. I think they are actually bolted to the 2x2 track ties, through the face.

It will be interesting to see if Timber Wolf is getting some of the same structural modifications that Mean Streak got, in particular the extra vertical posts between the bents which run down to the second ledger, and the steel plate that attaches to one face of selected ledger boards.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 7:40 PM
Instead of being concerned about what you can't control, just ride in the front seat at night or when the track is wet. TW still rocks.
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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 7:58 PM
I totally agree that it does rock (especially in the rain). But is important that the ride hold a positive identity.

Prowler. Opens May,2 2009.

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 8:23 PM

RideMan said:
The clamps have nothing to do with holding the layers together, and they do not attach the track to the ledgers.

The clamps are to hold the position of the rails relative to each other. The clever bit is that Cedar Fair's method (perhaps it's really more accurate to credit Martin & Vleminckx?) adds some adjustability. Because the cars cannot steer around the curve, there has to be a little bit of slop in order to keep the cars from binding on the curve. Of course, if the train were hugging the outside rail, it wouldn't make that much difference...but because the cars are ping-ponging back and forth, they adjust the track gauge so that hopefully there is enough slop for the train to pass, but not so much to allow the train to bounce around too much between the rails.

So that was my point...that the steel ties are there for holding the gauge, not for holding the track together or tying it to the ledgers. I think they are actually bolted to the 2x2 track ties, through the face.

It will be interesting to see if Timber Wolf is getting some of the same structural modifications that Mean Streak got, in particular the extra vertical posts between the bents which run down to the second ledger, and the steel plate that attaches to one face of selected ledger boards.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.


Thanks for clearing that up ;)

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 9:06 PM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar Back seat all the way! :)

AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 9:45 PM
I visited Worlds Of Fun for the first time last Setember for the first weekend of Halloweekends.

I LOVED Timberwolf and it easily finished in the top half of my woodies, and ahead of my number 1 steel.

I am not bothered by shuffle and in fact I actually enjoy it.

Most of my rides on coasters are in the front seat though and when riding back car I often prefer the front seat of the back car to get a better view. Also I like to hold on to grab bars and/or lap bars to brace myself and keep the bar where I set it in order to not get stapled and lose airtime. So perhaps these factors contribute to why alleged "roughness" doesn't bother me.

What I remember most about Timberwolf was the strong solid airtime, which was surprisingly good in the front. Strong, stand-up airtime where for a split second you feel like you're gonna get ejected. I LOVED it!

LOVED Mamba as well. At the time my number one steel, and probably will be until I ride my first Intamin hyper at Cedar Point this October. I bet Magnum will give it a good run and possibly top it as well.

The other two coasters I rode at WoF on the other hand... ;)

My biggest regret was that I didn't visit the park early enough in it's life to ride Zambezi Zinger, which I'm sure was KILLER at night.

I love the 70's era regional themers and thought the park and it's theming were very charming. LOVED all the trees and atmosphere and yes, the employees were very nice. Didn't care for the "no re-rides during walk-on conditions" policy but accepted it as an apparent part of the Cedar Fair experience. With two trains running and VERY efficient crews on both the woody and hyper, it really didn't end up costing me many rides (I spent a lot of time marathoning on Timberwolf and Mamba that weekend, including LOTS of laps at nightime thanks to the midnight closing time!)

Looking forward to a possible return trip this year as I'll be focusing heavily on Cedar Fair parks on my annual Halloween trips where I hit a different park each weekend from late September - October.

Frontrider *** Edited 8/2/2006 1:50:30 AM UTC by Frontrider*** *** Edited 8/2/2006 1:56:04 AM UTC by Frontrider***

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 10:01 PM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar Zinger was a great ride all day long. Glad you were able to see the good in Timber Wolf.

AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 10:28 PM
Well I rode TW during Halloween last year as well and was shocked at the different ride this year. Maybe the added speed from the heat is causing the difference, but I expected something different based on the work being done.

I agree completely with Dave on his analysis of the 'going to slow for design' theory, which is what I also think is part of Mean Streak's overall problem (although I thought my rides on that last week were the best they have been in years). Hopefully, the continued work will pay dividends at some point.

BTW, I like the sprinklers.


Fever I really enjoy the Simpsons. It's just a shame that I am starting to LOOK like Homer.
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Tuesday, August 1, 2006 10:56 PM

Frontrider said:


Looking forward to a possible return trip this year as I'll be focusing heavily on Cedar Fair parks on my annual Halloween trips where I hit a different park each weekend from late September - October.


Oh you are in for a treat if you are coming during WOF's Halloweekends. The haunted mazes and scare zones at this festival are insane. The Asylum Island is the newest of the bunch and from what I have heard from the park they are pulling out all the stops. It is actually going to be over in OOF and you will have to cross the Monsoon bridge to get to it.

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006 1:33 AM
RIP Zambezi Zinger. You are loved.

Orient Express was like Ninja at SFSL. A mean Arrow bangin' machine!

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006 9:25 AM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar Ninja's not an Arrow though. It's a Vekoma.:)

We can still ride Zinger--just have to get ourselves down to Columbia....no not, Columbia, Missouri. ;)


AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006 10:19 AM
Ninja has more Arrow than Vekoma in it. The ride was designed by Arrow, you can tell by the supports etc. Vekoma may have manufactured it, but it's still a Toomer.

Prowler. Opens May,2 2009.

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Wednesday, August 2, 2006 2:37 PM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar Funny, according to RCDB, it's:
Make / Model: Vekoma / Custom MK-1200
Builder: Arrow

It seems the ride was mostly designed by the Vekoma gods and then built by the Toomer crew. *** Edited 8/2/2006 6:39:27 PM UTC by Acoustic Viscosity***


AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

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