Shanghai Disneyland will close in effort to contain coronavirus

Posted Friday, January 24, 2020 11:49 AM | Contributed by Tekwardo

Shanghai Disneyland will close its gates on Saturday in an effort to stop the spread of a new SARS-like virus that has killed 26 people and sickened at least 881, primarily in China. It’s not known when the theme park may reopen.

Read more from Gizmodo.

Related parks

Friday, March 26, 2021 12:51 PM

wahoo skipper said:

Bottom line, the trip reminded me about how much I enjoyed the parks before Fastpass. Even the longest lines kept moving which "feels" better, in my opinion. We didn't have the stress about selecting rides (and leaving others out). Fastpass was starting to convert me...but this was a nice reminder of how things once were.

This has been my experience each time I have been to a Disney park since they reopened. Even when the lines are long, they don't crawl to a standstill to allow for all the FP+ guests to go through. In the paper Fastpass days, enough attractions didn't have them and it was easier to play the FP game where it just wasn't as much of an issue for the E-tickets. I'd rather wait 20-30, even 40 minutes for everything rather than get my three rides reserved (and at Epcot, for example, I can't even get Test Track and Soarin' toegther) and then have painfully slow 90 minute standby queues for anything else I want to do. WDW attractions operating at reduced capacity for distancing still have better throughput than most parks can do filling trains, and it's so noticeable right now when those lines never stop moving.

Kissimmee was a nightmare (we stayed in an AirBNB around the corner from GKTW). Traffic was insane, use of masks was sporadic at best, "Dad...it looks like you brought us to a MAGA rally", but it was Spring Break after all. Kissimmee would be well served to do some traffic light timing studies because it is atrocious.

In short, the On-Property experience was positive, off-property borderline sketchy, but a nice trip all in all.

To be fair, you could have easily said all of this (minus the masks) about the 192 Kissimmee tourist experience in 2019. I'm fully convinced the traffic lights in Central Florida are intentionally not synchronized just to f**k with us.

+1Loading
Friday, March 26, 2021 6:45 PM
Jeff's avatar

You know, as the outlook gets better, it's clear that the CDC needs to prioritize the science around relaxing mask rules. Specifically, the question about the ability of the vaccinated to transmit the disease. That has profound impact on movie theaters, dramatic theaters, theme parks and cruise ships.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+0
Friday, March 26, 2021 7:14 PM
ApolloAndy's avatar

Are we at the point where that's the salient issue? (That might sound leading, but it's an honest question). I know we've said forever that mask rules would be the last thing to go because they don't have a huge impact on the economy and do a lot of good for protecting people. But are we at the point where "enough people are enough protected" and "enough people are staying home because they're annoyed by masks" that the tradeoff is becoming non-obvious.


Hobbes: "What's the point of attaching a number to everything you do?"
Calvin: "If your numbers go up, it means you're having more fun."

+0
Saturday, March 27, 2021 10:11 AM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

Lord Gonchar said:

It flat out describes the deal in the article:

If anything, the 95 percent number understates the effectiveness, because it counts anyone who came down with a mild case of Covid-19 as a failure. But turning Covid into a typical flu — as the vaccines evidently did for most of the remaining 5 percent — is actually a success. Of the 32,000 people who received the Moderna or Pfizer vaccine in a research trial, do you want to guess how many contracted a severe Covid case? One.

Based on the trial of 32,000 people:

It was 95% effective at preventing infection and reduced the risk to that of the typical flu for an additonal 4.997%.

It was 99.997% effective at preventing severe cases of COVID.

Apollo Andy said:

So I've been thinking about and parroting this a lot, and unless I'm missing something, 99.997% is not right.

The effectiveness at preventing severe cases of COVID is a relative measure and should compare the number of severe cases of COVID in the placebo group to the severe cases in the vaccine group. That proportion is the effectiveness at preventing severe cases of COVID. The fact that 1 vaccinated person out of 30,000 had severe symptoms does not mean that the vaccination was 99.997% effective at preventing severe cases of COVID, because if 2 unvaccinated out of 30,000 had severe symptoms then it's only 50% effective. Right?

So the YouTube machine fed me a video that reminded me of our conversation.

Yes, it's a Vox video. And yes, it's over-simplified. But at one point near the end of the video after all the explanation, Deborah Fuller of the Department of Microbiology at the University of Washington sums it up by saying verbatim, "...that all three vaccines have essentially 100% effectiveness in protecting from death."

(Although she specifies death in her comment, they're talking about hospitalization - or severe cases - as well in the video)

So yeah. Regardless of the 'correct' way to express it, the point is (and was) that the vaccines effectively completely prevent severe illness or worse.

Like I said, simple little Vox video, but if any of us have anyone in our lives that still needs nudged on the vaccine, it might help spell it out in grade-school terms.


+3Loading
Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:36 AM
ApolloAndy's avatar

Good stuff. Nice to have it in a short and accessible format. Is it bad that all I can think about while watching the video is how poorly most people understand stuff like this? (see also: how does an mRNA vaccine work). Just call me Debbie Downer, I guess.

Last edited by ApolloAndy, Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:36 AM

Hobbes: "What's the point of attaching a number to everything you do?"
Calvin: "If your numbers go up, it means you're having more fun."

+0
Saturday, March 27, 2021 12:05 PM

I think Vox has consistently had the best and clearest explanation of various issues throughout the last year, of the various (too many) news sites I visit. Quite honestly I had no idea what the efficacy number represents (and honestly, I don't think there's any reason I should have to know that; that's what we have experts for). This was quite helpful in clarifying that. Thanks for posting it.

+0
Saturday, March 27, 2021 12:14 PM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

Dare I point out that at the 5:00 mark in that video, they use a slider to illustrate the outcome expectations?

We were so ahead of our time.

High five!


+9Loading
Saturday, March 27, 2021 1:19 PM
ApolloAndy's avatar

hambone said:

and honestly, I don't think there's any reason I should have to know that; that's what we have experts for

If only everyone would take that attitude. But too many people will take one tiny fact (95% efficacy) out of context with no expertise or understanding, then watch a YouTube video from some random blogger and then proclaim to know more than the experts (5% illness rate!!! Vaccines make you sicker!).

Remember when Fox News (or at least some talking head on Fox News) was saying this was the 19th corona virus so it wasn’t unusual?

Last edited by ApolloAndy, Saturday, March 27, 2021 1:20 PM

Hobbes: "What's the point of attaching a number to everything you do?"
Calvin: "If your numbers go up, it means you're having more fun."

+2Loading
Saturday, March 27, 2021 2:15 PM
Jeff's avatar

Worse, it was Kellyann Conway.

Scientists scienced the **** out of this virus in record time, and they deserve credit for that. But I think smart phones are still amazing, so I'm likely not representative of the population.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+0
Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:52 PM

It was Kellyanne who said "This is Covid-19, not Covid-1, folks" on FoxNews (about 50 seconds in).

Makes me think of this:

Last edited by GoBucks89, Saturday, March 27, 2021 11:53 PM
+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 9:26 AM
Jeff's avatar

Nationally, cases are up 15% over the last two weeks, which sucks. I wish there was a more detailed breakdown of who is getting infected right now, because the 65+ crowd is over 50% vaccinated in most places, and overall populations are around 15%. Even if you've got one shot, you're around 89-90% effective after two weeks. Are people behaving that poorly in spite of the vaccinations?


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 10:05 AM

Yes. Have you seen South Florida beaches? North Florida was a mess too when we were there and I hear the west coast of the state has gotten worse.

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 10:18 AM

Jeff said:

Are people behaving that poorly in spite of the vaccinations?

As someone who is now halfway vaccinated *and* has continued to dine in restaurants throughout this entire thing, I've walked out of two restaurants in the last week, including one last night that just a month or so ago was still doing a great job.

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 10:30 AM

Yes, they are. We just picked up takeout from a local restaurant. The number of people eating inside far exceeded any capacity that we have seen in the past three years.

Drove past Cleveland Metroparks Zoo on Saturday. They are supposedly running at 75% capacity. There was not a parking spot to be had. We drove on by.

People are just ready to get out. Unfortunately, many are no longer being careful.

+1Loading
Monday, March 29, 2021 11:04 AM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

Gonna "me too" here.

After arguing for months and months that people around here were wearing masks and following protocol, this past weekend was a bit surprising in my area. Not "a lot" of maskless people, but enough that it was surprising. Places far busier than I've seen in quite a while. Guards are definitely down in general.

I suppose it depends on who is getting sick and if where death counts land in the coming weeks because if it's vaccinated folks and dry humpers and people generally not at great risk, then *shrug* - no harm, no foul.

There are people that just aren't going to get the vaccination. At some point it's no longer my priority to protect them. Still a bit too soon, but also seeing vaccinations being readily available very soon and "whatever, it's on you" territory on the horizon.


+3Loading
Monday, March 29, 2021 11:39 AM

I have gotten a lot of carry out meals with my dad since patios closed in the fall. Curbside pickup locations were typically crowded until a couple weeks ago. Now there are fewer cars in curbside pickup lines and more cars in restaurant parking lots. For restaurants without curbside pickup, there has been a noticeable increase in the last couple of weeks of people eating inside the restaurants.

And driving through the neighborhood and around time, you see more cars parked in driveways than you did a month or so ago.

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 11:56 AM
Jeff's avatar

I missed this article from last Friday, but it mentioned that the B.1.1.7 variant, which is 50% more transmissible, is gaining traction as the most common. I suppose if you combine that with even a little bit of lax behavior, you're going to get a rise in infection rates. That we bottomed out at the October rate is not great. Let's hope the vaccinations are moving fast enough to head this off and prevent another surge.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 11:57 AM
Jeff's avatar

Lord Gonchar said:

There are people that just aren't going to get the vaccination. At some point it's no longer my priority to protect them. Still a bit too soon, but also seeing vaccinations being readily available very soon and "whatever, it's on you" territory on the horizon.

I agree, and seriously, **** those people, but for the 20 and 30-somethings that have a few more weeks before they can get pricked, that's a raw deal.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+0
Monday, March 29, 2021 12:17 PM
Jeff's avatar

So much news to process... really good news reported today in a new CDC report. The TL;DR is that even one shot is 80% effective at two weeks, and transmission by vaccinated people is "extremely unlikely," which is probably the last variable we desperately needed to get data on.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

+2Loading
Monday, March 29, 2021 12:23 PM

Right now the US is at around 30% of the population having at least one shot. We are vaccinating around 1% of the eligible population each day. If we can continue that pace, and there are enough willing arms, then it stands to reason we should be at around 70% of the population with at least one dose in around 6 weeks. Hopefully that will translate into around Memorial Day seeing infection rates dropping significantly.

Ohio reported that of the 400,000 cases of Covid since vaccinations started in mid December, only 34 cases were from people that had been vaccinated. That translates to .0085%.

Last edited by Bozman, Monday, March 29, 2021 12:26 PM
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2021, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...