No re-entry after 7? Kings Island.

Wednesday, October 17, 2007 12:42 PM
^^Then what violent event happened at KI to spawn all of this "security"?

The policy is crap. I like to go out to my car for occassional breaks because it's not noisy and crowded. Now, I can't do that any more?

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 12:53 PM
I can't answer that, I was just responding to the comparison of urban vs. rural parks. I agree that the policy sucks. I personally don't see a reason for it, and would be annoyed if I couldn't go to my car after 7.
+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 12:57 PM
I see what you're saying. IMO, it doesn't really get cold until after 7pm, so I guess I'll just have to get a locker to store my jacket in. I'd rather spend that money on something else. Not that it's a huge amount or anything.
+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 1:14 PM
How many of you guys have done a Halloween event on a Saturday night recently?

I know even here in Minnesota, the clientele can be at least as scary-looking as the folks in makeup. I wouldn't wanna give them a chance to head out to the car for a couple shots of Jay Dee or a funny cigarette or two.

And as a matter of fact, I was freezing my backside off come dark. So was Da Midget. We took off for home once we got cold.

-CO

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 1:14 PM

millrace said:
Cincinnati may be an urban area but Kings Island is not in Cincinnati or in anything remotely resembling an urban area. It's in the middle of a sea of low-density suburban crap.
You're kidding, right? There's a city bus route to the park. It's a few miles out of town. It's a couple of miles outside of the beltway.

If people come to the park to make trouble, how is letting them in once but not a second time going to make any difference?
Others have been over that. It's about going back to your car and liquoring up, causing trouble after dark, you know, all the things that we've posted countless stories about in various park parking lots around the country for years.

You're arguing whether or not that stuff goes on, and everyone else is arguing about whether or not this policy is the right way to deal with the problem.

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 1:22 PM
I don't know which is sadder-- the fact that certain parks have decided to treat every guest as a potential troublemaker/rulebreaker, or the fact that so many people are blindly following without question if not outright excusing it.

Just one more example of how we're giving up something in exchange for "more security."

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 1:44 PM
^To expand on my previous statement...it's annoying, but not something I'm going to lose sleep over, or let ruin my day (or night in this case).

No 'blind following' here, but also not something all that important that I'm going to pitch a fit about.

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 1:55 PM

Jeff said:


You're arguing whether or not that stuff goes on, and everyone else is arguing about whether or not this policy is the right way to deal with the problem.


Not really. I'm arguing that drunken melees in parking lots aren't restricted to "urban" areas. And that's assuming that there is actually a problem. Has that been proven? And is Halloween a more likely time for problems to occur? And if people do show up to cause a problem, the front gate should stop those people from coming in. It doesn't matter if it is a first-time entry or a re-entry.

Actually, the crime excuse probably isn't a function of urban vs rural but rather an example of corporate-think vs independent/smaller/traditional-park-think.

What's Kennywood's policy for Halloween events?

And a "couple of miles outside the beltway" does not make it an urban area. The beltway is already many miles from "true urbaness". Are "scary inner city trouble makers" really going to take a bus to Kings Island to make trouble? Or will the trouble come from bored teenagers from a wealthy gated "community?" *** Edited 10/17/2007 5:58:08 PM UTC by millrace***

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 2:04 PM

Vater said:
No 'blind following' here, but also not something all that important that I'm going to pitch a fit about.

It's getting to the point where I don't even have to post - everyone seems to be taking the words right out of my mouth. :)

This would describe me as well.

"Blindly Following" insinuates that I don't like it but follow because I think someone knows better.

Not caring because it doesn't affect me is an entirely different issue.

In this case it's most certainly the latter. Hell, make every park no re-entry ever. It won't change my visiting habits one bit.

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 2:09 PM
My experience in my own home park Saturday night has nothing to do with anybody else's hundreds of miles away.

If my opinion seems to coincide with theirs, maybe you're 'blind' to the truth that many people--each an individual from a different background--happen to feel that way. Not just some 'corporate entity.'

-CO

Edit: Added the word 'to'

*** Edited 10/17/2007 6:10:34 PM UTC by CoastaPlaya***

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 2:18 PM

millrace said:
I'm arguing that drunken melees in parking lots aren't restricted to "urban" areas.
And everyone else I'm sure agrees, but there's a much higher tendency for it to happen near urban parks, again, as we've seen in countless stories over the years (SFA, SFOG, SFGAdv, among others). Not to mention Kings Island will attract upward of 30,000 guests for something like this. Yet another factor you have to consider.

That said, the connection between corporate vs. indie parks is again applying universal rules to different scenarios. How many indie parks draw 30,000+ on any given day? Crowds breed problems too.

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 3:58 PM

CoastaPlaya said:
How many of you guys have done a Halloween event on a Saturday night recently?

I know even here in Minnesota, the clientele can be at least as scary-looking as the folks in makeup. I wouldn't wanna give them a chance to head out to the car for a couple shots of Jay Dee or a funny cigarette or two.

And as a matter of fact, I was freezing my backside off come dark. So was Da Midget. We took off for home once we got cold.

-CO


I went last year to Fearfest. I saw nothing scary in the parking lot after dark. And, the dark time is what I came for anyway. All of the haunts take place mainly after dark.

+0
Wednesday, October 17, 2007 4:04 PM
Uhh...you mighta been one of the scary people! :)

KIDDING. Sorry, I couldn't let that one pass!

-CO

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 9:54 AM
^That was rather funny. :)

Here's my next question. If they are so paranoid about a lot of drinking & fighting in the parking lot, then why gear it towards those people?

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 12:56 PM
Disposable income my friend! Teens have a lot of money and no bills to pay, no mouths to feed other then their own, and they like to have fun. What better way to do it then at a park where you can show off to all your friends that you aren't scared to ride the latest and greatest roller coasters? Then you can go to a game booth and win an overpriced stuffed animal to give to your girl if you're lucky, all while spending more money in the mean time.

Parents are much more economical wanting to take picnic lunches, etc. What they fail to see though is that parents stay overnight while teens drive back home...

This is yet another reason I have only visited the smaller family operated parks the past two years. I hate being treated like a "thug" when I go into a park, walking through metal detectors and being told when I can or can't do everyday things. If I wanted to be treated like that I would go back to high school.

If I was going to do drugs or drink I would just sneak it into the park with me, it's not hard at all... going back to my car makes no difference. They could have one security guard patrol the lot as well and it wouldn't cost much if they are that worried about it. If someone is up to no good they will find a way to do it regardless of any rules.

They are handling the situation the wrong way, but then again they are big business and they tend to lose sight of what it's like to be a normal visitor to the park.

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 1:02 PM

BeccaRaptor said:
Disposable income my friend! Teens have a lot of money and no bills to pay, no mouths to feed other then their own, and they like to have fun. What better way to do it then at a park where you can show off to all your friends that you aren't scared to ride the latest and greatest roller coasters? Then you can go to a game booth and win an overpriced stuffed animal to give to your girl if you're lucky, all while spending more money in the mean time.

Parents are much more economical wanting to take picnic lunches, etc. What they fail to see though is that parents stay overnight while teens drive back home...


That's an interesting take. I believe the conventional wisdom around here is just the opposite - the teens bring nothing to the table and roping in mom & dad is where it's at.

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 1:27 PM
Well, let's look it up!

According to mediapost:


...teens ages 16 to 17 possessing nearly $4,500 in discretionary income, often used to buy their own clothing, entertainment, and music.

Sounds great, right? Unfortunately, according to a Harris Interactive study in 2003, they are hesitant to part with that money on their own:


During the teen years, the amount of money young people feel they can spend without parental permission is low--especially considering the amount of discretionary income they have....In the college-age range, boys tell us they can spend $469 on average without parental permission...

What's more, that $4500 sum is pretty paltry compared to a family, according to a conference board study from 2005:


Households in New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania top the country in per capita discretionary income ($9,699). Ranking next are households in New England (including Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island and Vermont), where per capita discretionary income is $9,522. Per capita discretionary income is lowest in the West North Central region (including Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas) at $7,040.

What's important about those numbers are that they are per-person, not per family. So, a "family" has more spare cash to spend per person than does a "teen".

So, I don't buy the claim that teens are where the action is.

*** Edited 10/18/2007 5:28:18 PM UTC by Brian Noble***

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 2:25 PM
Hmm, then to rephrase Coasterbuzzers question-- why are parks spending so much money on events that attract a large number of people in a demographic that doesn't spend a lot of money and tends to engage in undesirable behaviors? (undesirable by the park that is.)

And in the process shunning the people who supposedly have the real bucks to spend. A lot of people have called Hersheypark in the Dark a lame event because it's family oriented. But maybe they have the right idea.

If the temps stay in the 70s this weekend like they're forecasting, the park is likely to be packed. And if you want to leave the park and come back in? Sure go right ahead, we know you'll be stopping off at Chocolate World anyway.

+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 2:51 PM
As a NASCAR fan I can honestly say that proof is available about people doing things in the parking lot of Kings Island. Do a quick search on the name Aaron Fike and Kings Island and see what you find. It might be an isolated incident but hey it's proof of what they may be trying to stop.
+0
Thursday, October 18, 2007 2:54 PM
Because this is trailer trash at Halloweekends.
*points at egg spending money on stuff*

This is trailer trash at Halloweekends on meth!
*points at egg punching other eggs in the face*

Any questions?

Actually--if my local park is any indication--most Halloweekends activities by day ARE family-oriented. Then things change...

-CO

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2019, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...