PTC announcement coming

Sunday, June 24, 2007 1:00 AM
People have died, but many of the deaths can be attributed to rider stupidity or mental instability.
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Sunday, June 24, 2007 1:02 AM
Son't get me wrong, If they work, Quit tearing up tracks and become pretty common. I'll be extatic that CCI has a better choice. Another thing I know is that there are things they would like to do but can't due to train limitations.

I still haven't seen this rendering. I hope like hell they've made some changes to the BOX such as open fronts and curved sideboards padded over the top.

Chuck

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 10:28 AM
Jeff's avatar

Rob Ascough said:
Actually Jeff, I'm just paraphrasing something you said about B&M's website a few years back... you having said something along the same lines. But wait, that was back in 2004 or 2005. This is 2007. Things have changed completely in the past two or three years, right? Dude?
You're good at taking things out of context. Enthusiasts were crying that the B&M site didn't have the latest photos of whatever rides on it. I pointed out that it didn't matter, and still believe that. B&M still has functional links to the handful of pages they have. PTC does not.

It's not about being flashy, it's about representing yourself professionally. That's what I posted. Would it be cool if they showed up at IAAPA with parts of their booth missing?


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 12:01 PM

Jeff said:

It's not about being flashy, it's about representing yourself professionally. That's what I posted. Would it be cool if they showed up at IAAPA with parts of their booth missing?


You really want to try, and tie in the benefits of a website with absoluetly everything in the world of business, don't you. Now it's more likely for a company to not have there proper setups at a convention, all because they don't have a fully functional website.

I guess little kid's lemonade stands all across the country don't stand a chance anymore without a proper website to help promote them.

Your problem is that you run a website, and you think that it's the absolute to everything now. I gotta think that, that is how owners of newspaper used to feel.

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 2:39 PM
Jeff's avatar No, you need a good product first and foremost (and that's one thing I think they mostly have, despite all the crying about lap bars on this site). You don't know what I think. I never said it was the be-all, end-all to marketing. You're putting words in my mouth.

And I don't get your point about newspapers. They used to think that having a Web site was the key to everything? I don't know if that's true, but I'm sure they feel shrinking revenue from print advertising and classifieds while that money goes to the Internet, that's for sure.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 2:55 PM
Its says that the site is under construction does anyone know how long it has been that way. I agree with Jeff. A good website is key.
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Sunday, June 24, 2007 7:19 PM
rollergator's avatar I'm happy to see PTC is making the necessary adjustments to remain competitive in the marketplace bu building trains that are more capable of handling the increased demands by the high-intensity layouts being built these days. I'm willing to believe that the stress placed on the trains by Voyage, and in turn the stress placed on Voyage by the trains, added up to PTC coming up with a potentially highly-successful solution.

If it reduces the wear-and-tear on coasters that simply don't get the level of care they demand, then that works for the parks, and the patrons.... :)

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 7:43 PM
eightdotthree's avatar

Rob Ascough said:
Going out on a limb, I don't think that many amusement park operators have complained about the lack of attention they get from PTC.

You love to pick a fight. :) I am talking about the perception that a bad website can give off. I know PTC's history and I think they are awesome. But their website can potentially give off the perception that they don't pay attention to their customers.


Rob Ascough said:
If anyone believes that a good website is going to be the key to the company's future success, I'll steer clear of their marketing advice.

Do you honestly beleive this? Your not some old fart in disguise are you?


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Sunday, June 24, 2007 9:22 PM
Jeff, you're comparing apples to oranges. Of course it would be a big deal if PTC arrived at the IAAPA show with parts of their display booth missing, since a big presence at the IAAPA show seems to be very important to the company's continues success. The company's website, on the other hand, is superfluous. I doubt that PTC can attribute any orders to its website, so I really doubt it matters if the links don't work or if it happens to link to GCII's website.

^ You got me... you uncovered my dirty little secret. Outside, I'm a somewhat-normal-looking young guy that's in touch with the world around him, but inside I'm a crotchity old man that adjusts the rabbit ears on the top of his black and white TV to make sure I don't miss any Honeymooners reruns.

Do I honestly believe that a good website isn't the key to PTC's survival in the future? Hell yeah! PTC has relationships with many amusement park operators- in many cases, PTC has been supplying parks long before the current CEO's parents were even born. It's not like a hundred new amusement parks are going to appear on the horizon tomorrow and they're all going to hit Google to find out what companies they should be contacting for major equipment- future business is likely to come in two ways:

1. Current customers are going to go back to PTC just as they've been doing for decades, and chances are they're not going to need to go to the company's website to be reminded of what they do.

2. New customers are going to either come in contact with PTC at the IAAPA show or find out from other industry professionals that PTC is the company they should be contacting. Again, a website isn't going to help very much there.

I'm not some closet old man that's out of touch reality, I just don't guy into the mentality that every company needs a website that offers downloadable podcasts and blogs by every employee. There are certain companies in certain industries that do not have- and will likely never have- a use for a website. Why is that so hard to understand?

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 9:34 PM
matt.'s avatar If I were PTC I would want my website, no matter how superfluous, to reflect on my company in the best light possible. Otherwise I wouldn't have one.

Having non-working links, when you could easily just take them down, would take all of about 3 seconds, and is just a bit silly and careless.

I don't think anyone is hearkening the impending doom of PTC based on their website. Let's not blow things out of proportion by likening having a working, functioning website to having podcasts and multiple employee blogs and whatever other bells and whistles.

I don't know very little about web design but I think I could get their site functioning and working reasonably well in....what? Like a day? It's not like it would be a complicated project. *** Edited 6/25/2007 1:35:47 AM UTC by matt.***

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 9:59 PM

Rob Ascough said:^ You got me... you uncovered my dirty little secret. Outside, I'm a somewhat-normal-looking young guy that's in touch with the world around him, but inside I'm a crotchity old man that adjusts the rabbit ears on the top of his black and white TV to make sure I don't miss any Honeymooners reruns.

Hey, I resemble that remark!

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Sunday, June 24, 2007 10:24 PM
eightdotthree's avatar

Rob Ascough said:
Do I honestly believe that a good website isn't the key to PTC's survival in the future? Hell yeah!

You know what, I mis-quoted you. I was speaking about companies in general, not just PTC. Your probably right, a company like PTC probably doesn't need a website to maintain their future, but can you say that a company like GCI, who has a great website, has not received any return on investment from it?


Rob Ascough said:
I just don't guy into the mentality that every company needs a website that offers downloadable podcasts and blogs by every employee.

Who said anything about podcasts, blogs etc? All anyone is saying is the website should either work, or not be there. Now tell me, why is that so hard to understand?


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Sunday, June 24, 2007 10:38 PM
http://thegravitygroup.com/news.html
Not updated since april 2006
Seem to be doing ok :)
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Sunday, June 24, 2007 11:35 PM
Okay - as a working professional marketing expert (do you want to see the degrees and paychecks?), I can tell you that a bad website (bad/broken links, poor graphics, obvious FrontPage, etc.) is a bad idea - no matter what your company or organization does.

If its doesn't work - dump it. No website is better than a non-functioning one.

A web presence is not necessary for a company like PTC. But if they choose to have one, it should work properly.


". . . don't you know baby that life is a scream!" - Gordon Gano

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Monday, June 25, 2007 1:21 AM
The S&S site isn't exactly functional either, fwiw.
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Monday, June 25, 2007 8:43 AM
Has anyone here ridden Wildcat at Hershey since they put the Millennium Flyer trains on it?

I, personally would LOVE to see MFlyer trains put on Voyage. Even though it's an out and back, IMO it still has a twister feel to it while riding it. I think it would be MUCH less of a headache inducer with MFlyer trains.

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Monday, June 25, 2007 9:17 AM
Believe it or not, I'm actually in agreement with a lot of you here. I would rather see a company get rid of their website if it's going to be a neglected mess, but the point of my argument has been that a company like PTC relies very little on anything internet-related to maintain and possibly grow their business. The same goes for GCII, GG, B&M, Intamin and whatever other major amusement ride manufacturer/designer/broker you can think of.

Buying a roller coaster is not like buying a microwave or a home theater system because the customer is a lot different. It's not like Six Flags does a search for "wood coaster train manufacturer" and suddenly comes across PTC's website- they know of PTC, they know what PTC does, they know how PTC takes care of their customers and they know how to contact PTC to get what they want. And someone new entering the amusement industry is going to hear of PTC by word-of-mouth- if you're at the point where you're ready to buy trains for your new wood coaster, chances are you've already talked to plenty of people that have helped steer you in the right direction.

PTC should either update their site or take it down, but the point is that it really doesn't matter one bit.

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Monday, June 25, 2007 10:09 AM
rollergator's avatar ^While I agree that it makes NO difference to PTC's ultimate success or failure, it DOES show a bit of "sloppiness" - that, IMO, is where the other viewpoint has merit. Thankfully, I *know* that PTC takes great care in building one of the better coaster trains on the market....even if the website doesn't live up to those same standards... ;)
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Monday, June 25, 2007 10:15 AM
Exactly. I'm big on aesthetics so if that were my company, that website would get to me because I'd wonder what people thought when they saw it. But I'm betting that 95% of PTC's customers have never even seen the website and that it doesn't matter one bit.
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Monday, June 25, 2007 1:06 PM
eightdotthree's avatar

Rob Ascough said:
Buying a roller coaster is not like buying a microwave or a home theater system because the customer is a lot different.

Do you think we are all that stupid to not know this?


Rob Ascough said:
PTC should either update their site or take it down, but the point is that it really doesn't matter one bit.

So you think GCI and The Gravity Group are wasting their money on their websites? That they serve no purpose? I really don't know, but I can't help but think that someone is using them besides the dorky enthusiasts like us.


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