TTD is nothing

Thursday, May 8, 2003 5:52 PM
Just kidding. ;)

Aircraft Carriers launch fighter jets from 0 to approx 200mph in less than 2 seconds over just 300ft!

That's pretty close to real top fuel dragsters, record is 0 - 330mph in 4.5 seconds over a quarter-mile.

What would it be like to ride in those! Then again TTD is the closest we'll probably ever get. :)

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 5:56 PM
Yeah, but Jet Flyers are hooked up the Oxygen so they don't black out and fuel drags are very dangerous. I agree that those are the ultimate thrills, but TTD is the best we can do now, pluss they are open air and very limited in side protection.

------------------
Love,
The Mole

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 6:12 PM
Bah, that's nothing....the worst is an ejection from a plane! There's a reason why you are grounded after 2 ejections (no matter if it was your fault or not) That acceleration is damaging to the body....you are literally an inch shorter for the rest of your life! :)

------------------
- "I used to be in the audio/visual club, but I was kicked out because of my views on Vietnam........and I was stealing projectors" - Homer Simpson

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 6:17 PM
To put things in another perspective Jerry Nadeua just survived a Nascar crash with serious injuries that was reportedly a 100 G hit.

Amazing what the body can take.

------------------
Ah what the hell.....Magnum What?

S:ROS blew me away

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 6:17 PM
yeah ejection is something like 12-14 g's. insane.

------------------
"It's like something out of that twilighty show about that zone"

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 6:53 PM
I recall a Discovery program about Gs. They told about the pioneer in G force study back in the 40s/50s. Since he didn't have computers, he did the experiments to himself. Most of his peers thought 20 Gs for more than a second would kill you. He thought he would do 40, and did. Both his retnas detached, both his lungs collapsed, etc, but he was patched up and survived! :)

------------------
- "I used to be in the audio/visual club, but I was kicked out because of my views on Vietnam........and I was stealing projectors" - Homer Simpson

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:01 PM
An accident in Schaumburg (Chicago suburb) reportedly put a girl through 300 Gs! But she died. It was a car crash. It was talked about in a Shaumburgian High School physics class.

------------------
120+420=TTD

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:08 PM
300 gs? how could you even measure that?

------------------
I AM CANADIAN
why aren't you?

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:21 PM
If it was a crash, it wouldn't have been measured, it would have been calculated. One G is a measure of acceleration equal to close to 32 ft/sec/sec. If you slam into a wall at 60 MPH, and come to a stop within 0.009 seconds, you would experience 88 ft/sec / 0.009 sec = 9,777 ft/sec/sec = 305 G.

In investigating a wreck, the time is also calculated, based on the deformation of the vehicle.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:24 PM
Top Fuel Dragsters are *very* dangerous?? Quite different. Try crashing your car at 300+mph and see if you survive. Guys in Top Fuel do it quite often. In fact, there was just recently a very firery crash, the car rolled several times, cockpit engulfed in flames, front of the car (cockpit forward) broke off from the rear of the car (engine back), and the guy pretty much walked away. NHRA racing is VERY safe...... So is Nascar really for that matter.


Eric
------------------
"I'm hoping to see if any dead people will be my friends." - SS

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:28 PM
Considering the speeds and severity of accidents Racing is safe. The number of deaths per miles drove is far far less then that in normal driving.

As for calculating G's in NASCAR they do have black boxes that measure g spikes and such.

------------------
Ah what the hell.....Magnum What?

S:ROS blew me away

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:31 PM
I read in an IAAPA publication (trade organization for the amusement industry) that duration of the G force is also an important factor when measuring their effects on the body.

Get this: a high school student speculated that rope jumping displayed greater G forces than did almost all coasters. For a school science project, he was able to get a scientist to help him measure G forces while rope jumping. He ended up being right. But because the G forces are very short lived, they don't feel anything like those experienced on a good, fast coaster.

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:34 PM
Actually the severity of g forces while driving a car down a fairly rough road are far higher then those experienced on a coaster.

------------------
Ah what the hell.....Magnum What?

S:ROS blew me away

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 7:39 PM
...someone should tell Markey...

[edit]

I just thought of something... I would give anything to get an onride of Markey from TTD with his face all stretched out & the cheek flap going. How cool would that be?
*** This post was edited by BBSpeed26 5/8/2003 11:41:54 PM ***

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 8:28 PM
Actually Taipan, I have a very high chance of experiencing a launch off of an aircraft carrier. I am enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps (I leave a month from today), and well the Marines are onboard Navy ships. But, I might get to do that. I hope I get to.

Edit- With my job, Security Force (Anti-Terrorism) I can get stationed onboard carriers.

------------------
Rob


"Some people spend an entire LIFETIME wondering if they made a DIFFERENCE. The MARINES don't have that problem." -President Reagan 1985
*** This post was edited by ALF is cool 5/9/2003 12:29:34 AM ***

+0
Thursday, May 8, 2003 8:49 PM

RideMan said:
If it was a crash, it wouldn't have been measured, it would have been calculated. One G is a measure of acceleration equal to close to 32 ft/sec/sec. If you slam into a wall at 60 MPH, and come to a stop within 0.009 seconds, you would experience 88 ft/sec / 0.009 sec = 9,777 ft/sec/sec = 305 G.

In investigating a wreck, the time is also calculated, based on the deformation of the vehicle.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

----------------------------------------------

I guess I am not going to experience the Gs from my head-on collision with a large tree at 50 m.p.h. any time soon on a coaster then. Quite the U-shape in the front of the Accord. I did experience "on ride theming", if air bag dust and engine smoke count.



*** This post was edited by carpediem01 5/9/2003 12:50:37 AM ***
+0
Friday, May 9, 2003 6:16 AM
FYI, from my past life in airbag sensor testing, the sensors for a vehicle's airbag are set to trigger with a deceleration impulse of about 6 to 7 g's, lasting over 40 milliseconds or so. (Those were the calibration numbers on the 1994 S10 pickup)

Later,
EV
-----
Remember that if you're one in a million, that means that there are 5000 other people on Earth, just like you.

+0
Friday, May 9, 2003 6:50 AM
Very interesting. Btw, Dragsters decelerate at 5G's at the end of the race!

The Guiness Book lists a race car driver surviving a deceleration from 108mph to zero in 26in in a crash - 179.8G. He suffered 29 fractures, 3 dislocations and six heart stoppages.

Highest voluntarily endured is 82.6G for 0.04sec on a water-braked rocket sled. The rider was hospitalized for 3 days. His retinas detached, probably the guy you were talking about Peabody.

Jeff has often said simply plopping on a couch can produce more G's than any coaster. This is proof alone why we are able to ride 'em.

Btw, the book lists click beetles experiencing 400G when jumping up a foot. Also peak brain deceleration at 2300G!

Rob, I envy you. :)


*** This post was edited by Taipan 5/9/2003 10:51:27 AM ***

+0
Friday, May 9, 2003 8:47 AM
ALF,

Chances are very low that you will ever get to ride a fighter jet. Remember, helicopters land on aircraft carriers too. Plan on many trips on helicopters. Tell your recruiter to stop lying, LOL!

Good luck. BWAAAAAAAAAAHHHAAAHAAAA HAAA!

Joe

USMC INFANTRY 1986-90
*** This post was edited by the thrill 2 5/9/2003 1:14:53 PM ***

+0
Friday, May 9, 2003 9:12 AM
Am I the only one who thinks that the CIC made a big mistake when he trapped on an aircraft carrier for that speech last week? No, I don't mean it was a mistake for him to take a jet onto a carrier to make a speech...I think his mistake was in staying on board until the boat made port. I'd think a carrier take-off would be a lot more fun than a carrier landing!

--Dave Althoff, Jr., Civilian.

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...