Park Pop Prices

Tuesday, January 20, 2004 10:04 PM
How much of a difference is there from the price that parks pay for pop ( soda ) and the price we would pay at Wal-Mart or something? Does Coke/Pepsi charge more for their beverages when parks purchase them as opposed to when people buy them in a store? I wondered if this could explain the incredibly overpriced bottled drinks at most amusement parks.
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Tuesday, January 20, 2004 10:45 PM
I am sure that most theme parks pay the same prices for soft drinks as most other companies (McDonalds, Burger King, etc.)

The boost the prices for pure profit (because the people will pay)

The same theory goes for Movie Theaters (it does not cost that much to pop popcorn, yet they still charge $7+ for a bag!) *** Edited 1/21/2004 3:46:27 AM UTC by SFOG Country***

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Tuesday, January 20, 2004 11:18 PM
It is all about demand, while you are in the park you can not go somewhere else to buy a Pepsi, so they can charge more for it. Similar to a 2 liter being the same price as a 20oz, if you want it now your going to want it cold. So you pay the extra cost.
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:11 AM
Its like the price of beer at the grocery store vs prices at clubs and sporting events, there out to make $$$ and they'll charge what the customers will pay for it. *** Edited 1/21/2004 5:13:17 AM UTC by Snap43***
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:14 AM
I was about to say "what the hell is pop" but then I noticed you had "soda" in brackets. Who the heck calls it POP? That's the sound a balloon makes when you burst it - not a carbonated beverage. ;) :p
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:25 AM
I am pretty sure that CP and I assume other parks have a deal with Pepsi/Coke in which soda is free for them in exchange for exclusivity and advertising. If not free, then at a very reduced price.

I could be wrong...does anyone else know for sure?

*** Edited 1/21/2004 5:26:05 AM UTC by dexter***

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 1:10 AM
I know for a fact that disney gets both their soda and popcorn for free (well actually in exchange for coke/orville riddenbacker using their name in ads ie. "the offical soft drink of disney world!")

Soda costs about $.03 for 12 oz to make add in the cup and youve got about $.05-$.10 which is how every resturant stays in business. Seriously ask a manager at any place and they will tell you that the most money they make is off of soda (even with free refils). *** Edited 1/21/2004 6:10:30 AM UTC by Touchdown***

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 1:19 AM
Samething i was wondering.
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 7:02 AM

Swoosh said:
I was about to say "what the hell is pop" but then I noticed you had "soda" in brackets. Who the heck calls it POP? That's the sound a balloon makes when you burst it - not a carbonated beverage. :p

Most places in the south call it "pop" as they do here in WV, although I am used to calling it "soda".

I am not sure who pays what for wholesale prices but I am sure each park is different. Most chain parks charge $3-$4 for a bottle of soda while the smaller parks sell it for little or nothing (like Holiday World).

I assume a park like Disney or Six Flags or Cedar Fair can get away with it because they market nationally and the average family/tourist will pay anything. At the smaller parks (who market locally or regionally) they are less apt to get away with charging $3 for a bottle of soda simply because the locals are used to the lower prices. I dunno.

At any sporting event they can charge anything they want and people will pay. Sporting events/concerts have the most insane markups of all.

$7 for a cup of beer? No freakin way! People will pay for it though.

-Tina

*** Edited 1/21/2004 12:16:41 PM UTC by coasterqueenTRN***

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 8:04 AM
Fortunately they only sell pop in Ohio, so you only have to check three parks.
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 8:47 AM
http://www.popvssoda.com
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 9:28 AM
I'm pretty sure the entire Midwest calls it "pop." When I think of "soda," I think of a tall mug full of ice cream and soda water.

In the South, I've noticed that soft drinks are called "Coke," even if they're talking about Mountain Dew.

I think only in New England and the West do people say "soda." Of course, New Englanders call milkshakes "frappes" so whatever.

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 9:30 AM
The pop v soda debate is old. It is soda pop. Either of those words work to describe it.

What I think is annoying, is that the south calls everything coke. Now THAT is something to get fired up about.

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 11:57 AM
And let's not get into the grinders/hero's/subs discussion. LOL!

Interesting site BTW Walt. :-D

-Tina

*** Edited 1/21/2004 5:07:58 PM UTC by coasterqueenTRN***

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:29 PM

Den said:
I'm pretty sure the entire Midwest calls it "pop." When I think of "soda," I think of a tall mug full of ice cream and soda water.

Well most of Missouri and Illinois refer to it as "soda" whereas Iowa calls it "pop". As for your version of what a "soda" is - that's a "float".

LOL! This is fun :)



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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:34 PM

eightdotthree said:

What I think is annoying, is that the south calls everything coke. Now THAT is something to get fired up about.


And we think it's annoying how everybody in the north calls a coke a pop or soda! It's all about perspective.

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:39 PM
I guess calling soda pop coke is like calling all cotten swabs qtips.
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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 12:46 PM
No soft drink supplier gives away anyhting. Nothing is free. Pepsi and Coke both set 'theme park pricing' for all parks, and that is what parks pay. Period.

Pepsi and Coke set 'marketing dollars' aside for each park, as a perk to move their products in as many outlets as possible. Parks get a nice advance check in the spring, and then get the balance in stuff all year, such as umbrellas, radio ads, etc.

Pepsi / Coke supply all equipment, such as coolers, fountain systems, etc. Granted, companies like Six Flags have incredible deals, as all their parks are Coke, and places like Kennywood have been Pepsi for over 25 years.

By the way, touchdown, soda costs about 1.25 cents per ounce, including the cup. And if you were spilling the beans about Disney's popcorn deal, which is not free, they would hunt you down and you know what.

Smaller parks should change every few years, like you should with car insurance. It means better equipment for your park. As for Wal-Mart, they buy on a separate negotiated deal, and their profit margins are not the same as theme parks. They deal stricky in volumne, and theme parks consider drinks a profit winner. *** Edited 1/21/2004 5:48:20 PM UTC by Agent Johnson***

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 1:40 PM

I guess calling soda pop coke is like calling all cotten swabs qtips.

Or referring to all cars as 'Ford'.

Southern Car Dealer: "What kind of Ford are you looking for today?"

Southern Car Buyer: "Well, I was thinking about one of them Dodge Durangos."

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Wednesday, January 21, 2004 1:45 PM
First of all my information is a couple years old and it came from a pleasent older disney bus driver told us this and many things. Normally I wouldnt believe him but the other interesting things he told us about (quarks of various rides and such) turned out to be true so thats why I said what I said. I have no connection to Disney other then the fact that Im going there again for the first time in a couple of years this summer. So take it or leave it.

Now onto more important things first of all Im a "soda" person. However for those of you who cant figure out why the south calls it coke I ask you do you call a tissue a Kleenex or a bandage a band-aid? As you can see it is not uncommon for people to call a product by its' first brand name which in the case of soda (ill never call it pop, pop is a sound not a drink but I digress) would be coke.

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