Orient Express curiosity

Friday, October 31, 2003 5:25 AM
Because of all of the "news" surrounding WOF's Orient Express, I decided to head over to RCDB and take a look at pictures of the ride. It was then that I noticed something peculiar about the design of the interlocked loops.

The picture here illustrates OE's two interlocked loops. If you take a close at them, you'll see that the upper loop features Arrow's old latice-type loop structure. Also, the track ties have quite irregular spacing- some seem to be mere feet from each other, while others are at least 8 or 10 feet apart. The lower loop, on the other hand, features Arrow's newer loop supports (which are basically long tubes) and has many more track ties, which seem perfectly spaced.

Was one of OE's loops rebuilt after the ride opened (after Arrow seemed to make some modifications to the basic design), or was the ride always this way?

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 5:37 AM
Af far as I know the Oreint Express had the new loop style since it opened in 1980. You would also notice this on the Kamakaze Curve too, as it had regular supports on it too. My Guess is that Arrow had to change the style of supports if they were gonna make complex loops.

BTW, I wonder if Arrow had put anymore latice-type loop structures on Coasters newer than the Orient Express (not counting the Great America Shockwaves or the reloactions).

------------------
Chris Knight
And I'll never, ever, ever, ever, ever make a song about the Sibbie.

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 5:41 AM
I'm guessing that there is not room for the lattice support structure on the bottom loop and the addition of that lattice structure allows for fewer track ties in the upper loop. Probably the way it was originally designed. Just a guess and hardly an educated one. ;)
+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 5:45 AM
Rob,

I know that Loch Ness, another Arrow design featuring inter-locking loops, utilises the latice structure on both loops.


http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery110.htm?Picture=1

This was built in 1978, two years before Orient Express.

My guess would be that they used the same configuration as Loch Ness originally, then modified it at some point after the coaster opened. The comments I'm hearing from those that rode the OE suggest that it aged very poorly and was subject to a number of modifications.

All the best.

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 5:46 AM
Quite on the contrary Bigboy:

http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery110.htm?Picture=5

Nessie has both lattice supports, which I actually believe are called "Truss supports"
------------------
The squirrel is only screaming because it hates the new restraints.

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 6:10 AM
Anybody know where an onride video of the Lochness may be?

------------------
For the sake of yourself, don't take anything I say seriously.

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 6:20 AM
There is a POV on one of the "America's Greatest Rollercoaster Thrills" videos.

------------------
SWOOSH
MidwestInfoGuide.COM
Beware theSPINNING DRAGON only at WOF in 2004

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 6:23 AM
Geez rob, you notice everything.

------------------
I'm highjacking every post. :):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):):);)

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 6:44 AM
Always gotta keep your eyes open...

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 8:46 AM
There seem to be several old Arrow loopers with irregular tie spacing. Corkscrew at Cedar Point is a good example.

------------------
Ripple Rock Amusement Park
"I'm a follower of American politics." - George W. Bush

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 8:53 AM
Perhaps the height of the upper loop necessitated the lattice support, where as the lower one, being closer to the ground, allowed for the other support type?

mOOSH

------------------
The only 2004 Coaster Calendar still available, plus holiday & all-occasion cards. All at S&D Greetings.

+0
Friday, October 31, 2003 9:39 AM
Mmmmmmmmperhapsssss..... ;)

------------------
"I go out at 3 o' clock for a quart of milk and come home to my son treating his body like an amusement park!" - Estelle Costanza

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 7:11 AM
mOOSH: Good point, although the larger Arrow multi-element coasters feature loops that are placed way high in the air and use the newer-style supports. I would think that the straight tubes would have been cheaper to use than those truss supports, just because it appears that less welding and less material is needed.

I've seen some Arrow shuttled with irregular spacing too. Actually, most Arrow shuttles seem to have the track ties spaced very far apart.

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 8:09 AM
Here is a good example of that:

http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery314.htm?Picture=2
------------------
Vist Ripple Rock Amusement Park
Flying Scooter now open!
*** This post was edited by millrace 11/4/2003 1:11:16 PM ***

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 8:35 AM
Man that thing looks to be in a terrible state of disrepair!
+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 8:45 AM
It should... its been SBNO for a few years now. I don't think that the park has any intention of putting it back into operation. Heck, they don't seem to have the money to remove it!

Yes, millrace, that's what I was talking about. I know its just an illusion, but it makes the track appear so flimsy!

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 8:47 AM
While on the topic of shuttles, I've noticed most of the loops have the lattice supports with the exception of SFEG. Are or were there others with the newer loop supports?

------------------
I gained six pounds on a clear liquid diet :)

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 8:50 AM
I think that Elitch's coaster is the only Arrow shuttle with the newer supports.

Arrow must have changed things in the early eighties, because if you look at "newer" off-the-shelf Arrow rides, they have the newer supports. MiA's Corkscrew is a fine example... unlike most Arrow corkscrews, it features the tube supports on the corkscrews instead of the usual truss supports. Same ride, different structure.

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 9:08 AM
Interesting thing about that Camden Park ride (and presumably all Arrow shuttles) is that the track has no back spine except for in the loop. Seems like they built those things on a budget anbd only added extra support, extra track ties where the forces were the greatest.

Camden may not want to spend the money to tear the thing down but perhaps they are hoping it will fall down. There are some significant chunks if the ride missing - including some of the support structures.

The train, however, is more or less intact. . .
------------------
Vist Ripple Rock Amusement Park
Flying Scooter now open!

+0
Tuesday, November 4, 2003 9:50 AM
You know, I always found that odd too (lack of spine except in the loop). Maybe it had something to do with the fact that the track was straight, and therefore didn't need the added strength of a spine? Then again, many Arrow mine trains were built without a spine. I'm no structural engineer, though, and that's only a guess.

Do you have any pics of Thunderbolt Express in its current state of partial assembly? The pics I have seen mainly show rust and very little else.

------------------
-Rob
A.C.E. member since 1990
Posting @ Coasterbuzz since 2000
E.C.C. member since 2002

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...