On snorting pixie dust

Wednesday, December 14, 2016 9:32 AM

I find reddit confusing because it's tiresome to go through everything on a thread like that, but did read this AMA pretty deep and it was really interesting. Regarding the dragging incident he indicates that Donald throwing a tantrum and him dragging him to another area was not unusual and part of the shtick. What happened was they knocked over a little girl in the process. He says she got right back up, was fine, parents didn't complain and moved on, but that's what was used to fire him. But claims the real reason was rooted in a whistle blowing incident which he doesn't go into.

Other supposed cast members posted that dragging or moving each other around isn't as weird as it sounds and a common thing when it comes to Donald. But of course, it's one side of the story and he sounds like someone that clashed with management on a regularly.

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Wednesday, December 14, 2016 11:29 AM
Tekwardo's avatar

Yeah I read it and still think it's BS. You don't drag another costumed character across the floor, playing or not, because someone can get hurt, and the (likely very expensive) costume can get damaged.

So what was he blowing the whistle on? He's not Snowden


cebeavers.tumblr.com

Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

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Thursday, December 15, 2016 1:47 PM

The biggest risk to dragging someone across the floor is an injury. If it was semi-planned shtick, then its OK. Donald would have been expecting it to happen, and Goofy would have been careful enough that nothing bad would happen. If it wasn't something that was planned out, then yes, I agree its not OK. I'm guessing that Goofy was treating it as some of the shtick that they use to entertain the guests.

As far as the costume goes, it depends on where they were. If it was an indoor location, and Goofy was dragging Donald on a tile or low pile carpet, a short distance, there wouldn't be much damage to the costume. If it was a long ways, on outdoor concrete, then there could be a little wear on the costume. I suspect Donald and Goofy were stationed near each other if Donald was able to tell that Goofy had signed his name on Donald's hat.

Generally, the bulk of the cost in one of those costumes is the head. The feet can be a bit pricey too. The body, is generally comparatively inexpensive compared to the head and feet. I don't see dragging someone a short distance as being too big of a risk for the costume, especially since the most expensive parts really won't have any wear.

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Tuesday, December 27, 2016 10:27 AM
Pete's avatar

Paisley said:
I suppose if you're one of those people destined to have a low paying job it may as well be a job playing Goofy..... Unlike McDonald's, where people automatically know what you make and that you have "gone nowhere" in life if you've been there for years and aren't in management.

I don't know about that, I pretty much would know that wearing a cartoon character suit is a bottom of the barrel low paying job. At least at McDonalds you are working in air conditioning and not subject to a bunch of tourists.


I'd rather be in my boat with a drink on the rocks, than in the drink with a boat on the rocks.

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Sunday, January 1, 2017 11:21 AM

I’m going to have to disagree with you. Character work at Disney is not a “bottom of the barrel low paying job.” There may be some places where they’ll take any schmuck they can find and throw him out in front of the crowd, but that is not the case at Disney.


The characters do have benefits that go beyond what can be quantified in dollars and cents. First, they bring lots and lots of smiles to lots of people. They will bring a smile to the face of just about everyone they greet during the day. This first point is true at most places where characters show up at, more so than the next two I am going to mention.

For most of the characters at the park there is always going to be someone that shows up, usually a young child, for which meeting the character is the highlight of the trip. Meeting the characters is something they have looked forward to for months, and now they finally get to meet their favorite Disney character. For them, and many many of the other people you greet during the day, that character is creating a memories that will last a lifetime.

On a slightly less cheerful note, there are many children with life threatening illnesses that visit the Disney parks, and meet the characters. For them, meeting the characters can be a rare bright spot amongst all the tests and hospital visits that the child may have to make.

Its reasons like I have listed above, that make worth while for the character workers to put up with the meager pay and hellishly hot working conditions.

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Sunday, January 1, 2017 12:09 PM

To some extent I would compare being a character to acting. I'm sure it doesn't take the most talented since you are never seen outside of costume but for the creative type I'm sure they get a bit of a morale boost being able to say they portray a particular character at Disney compared to emptying the fry baskets and taking drive thru orders.

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Sunday, January 1, 2017 12:16 PM
Tekwardo's avatar

Smiles don't pay bills.


cebeavers.tumblr.com

Don't cry because it's over, smile because it happened.

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Sunday, January 1, 2017 7:14 PM
LostKause's avatar

They do if you're Peewee Herman.


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Sunday, January 1, 2017 7:36 PM
slithernoggin's avatar

Og makes excellent points. I know several people who did that job. At least at that time, if a child was having a major issue or meltdown they could go the nearest gift shop and simply give the child something from the store at no cost. Meeting the Disney characters can be a very moving experience for kids (and some adults).

One of my friends was Cruella, among other characters, and while doing Cruella, was fond of going to the pet care facility and offering to take care of people's dogs.

Still, I raise an eyebrow at someone staying in that position for decades.


Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -- Groucho Marx

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Monday, January 2, 2017 10:51 PM

Oh, it absolutely is acting, in every way. I've known people with the job and others who hoped and prayed they'd get the job.

I saw a post on the Facebooks where a girl revealed what it was like to play a princess character at Disney, and her experiences match those of my friends'. For instance, to be a "face character" (one who speaks) you must go through a period of "fur character" training, as it's considered a tough gig but keeps the performer incognito. Characters are made to watch movies and mimic the voices and characteristics of the animated. The audition is tough, and those that land the job are usually in for an awakening,... blah blah blah.

Anyway, as a part-time actor and a Disney fan, I can totally see where there are some guys and gals out there that might strive to make this their life's work. I don't find it all that strange.

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Monday, January 2, 2017 11:14 PM
Pete's avatar

I understand the joy the characters bring to kids and the satisfaction some get from being a character. But, in answering the original point, I don't look at someone in a character costume and think "there is a highly paid professional". I always assumed the pay scale is similar to McDonald's or worse. Like Tekwardo said, "Smiles don't pay bills".


I'd rather be in my boat with a drink on the rocks, than in the drink with a boat on the rocks.

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017 6:06 AM

Has anyone ever looked at an actor (or any Disney employee, for that matter) and thought "there is a highly paid professional"?
I thought the original point was about longevity in the same job, not money.

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017 7:10 AM
slithernoggin's avatar

^^What RCMAC said very early in the morning.


Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -- Groucho Marx

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017 8:00 PM
LostKause's avatar

I compare someone enthusiastically working as a Disney costume character to being like a haunt actor. A lot of haunt actors want make a living at it, even though the pay is low. They will actually move to an area to find a haunt actor job. They take it very seriously. It's in their blood.

I know a few people who like to do it, but know that it won't pay the bills, so they just do it as a hobby. They still get really into it. Halloween is all year for them.


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Tuesday, January 3, 2017 8:54 PM
slithernoggin's avatar

Yes, but....

Haunt actors are by definition working in a a job that has a limited time frame. Working for decades with no advancement just strikes me as, well, odd.

Tangent: sitting in a rocking chair at Beech Bend Park I struck up a conversation with a sweet older lady in the next rocker. She and her husband, both retired, drove around in an RV. They worked at Beech Bend in the summers and a park in Florida during the winters.


Outside of a dog, a book is man's best friend. Inside of a dog, it's too dark to read. -- Groucho Marx

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Tuesday, January 3, 2017 9:35 PM
LostKause's avatar

I guess I should have been more clear. I was talking about dedicated haunt actors who move to tourist areas that have year-round haunted attractions, such as Orlando, Myrtle Beach, and Pigeon Forge.


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Wednesday, January 4, 2017 10:22 AM
kpjb's avatar

I saw two of these articles today, one about a guy working in a Disneyland restaurant for something like 40 years, and this one about a guy that's been driving 5mph for most of his adult life.


Hi

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