Monday, December 30, 2002 9:59 AM
Now i know im only 13, but i better start early. When i grow up, I plan on designing wooden roller coasters. Does anybody have any comments on where would be the best to work for. I wanted to work for CCI, but thats not happenning now is it, lol. Also, what degrees would i need, and what good engineering schools are there? Any help would be greatly appreciated.
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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:02 AM

Boy, if everyone who planned on designing coaster for a living actually did, there would be hundreds of coaster companies out there.

That said, you are on the right track (ha-ha) with engineering, math, etc. Purdue has an excellent engineering school.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:06 AM

Using the search feature I found these similar topics:

http://www.coasterbuzz.com/forums/thread.asp?ForumID=11&TopicID=12614

http://www.coasterbuzz.com/forums/thread.asp?ForumID=11&TopicID=26735

http://www.coasterbuzz.com/forums/thread.asp?ForumID=11&TopicID=17955

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The Other Siebert

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:23 AM

To tell you the truth I used to want to design coasters too. I am 13 also, but I think that it would be sorta boring.

I would rather take a job as a park manager where you deal more with the customers, choosing what rides should be added, that type of thing, sorta like Koch from holiday world.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:31 AM

Dang, I am 16 and I am not even thinking about careers yet. Oh well, to answer your initial question, I am sure you would need a math degree of some sort, as well as a construction one also. Beyond that, I can not think of anything else you would need. Probably wouldn't need more than 4 years of college.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:36 AM
On the contrary, ASCE, American Society of Civil Engineers (or something like that) is tossing around the idea of requiring a masters degree to apply for your PE in CivE. Most of the members of ASCE are against this policy, as it doesn't even need to be in CivE, it can be an MBA and it still counts, and there are other reasons its a dumb rule, but still, its out there, and has a good chance of passing as the members aren't rumored to have a vote in the final decision. So the point of this rambling is this, getting your 4-year degree is fine (most engineering degrees are 5 year though, to be realistic), but if you really want to own your own company, design firm, or manage a park, an MBA or other masters degree will be helpful (but try and get your first job to pay for it that's my goal!)

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Just don't be stupid. It's really not that hard.
Kumba #1
-- Brett

*** This post was edited by PittDesigner on 12/30/2002. ***

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:39 AM
I think the main coaster design degree is Civil Engineering (correct me if I'm wrong), and if you wanted to design chain lifts or sothing like that I think would be more leanient to Mechanical. It was mentioned earlier Purdue is a good engineering school (I would know since I live 10 minutes away and it'll probably be my school of choice).

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You can hear the laughter, you can hear the mighty roar. From the brickyard down in Indy to the white Chicago shore. It's a rollin', twistin', turnin' and might we both suggest. You get you fanny ridin' on the Cornball Express!

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Monday, December 30, 2002 10:41 AM
Pretty much any Big 10 school (the football conference) is a good engineering school. But big names and world renowned quality aren't the end-all either. Check out the Gravity Group's homepage, their one engineer has his degree from the University of Cincinnatti. Not that UC is a bad school, but its not recognized for its engineering program as far as I know. Same as Pitt (I would know that one ;) )

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Just don't be stupid. It's really not that hard.
Kumba's #1
-- Brett

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Monday, December 30, 2002 11:19 AM
Ya know somethin funny? I too am 13 and wanted to be a coaster designer but now I would rather be a park manager like Ride of Steel said. It seems being a park manager would be more fun and interesting(not to mention easier) than being a coaster designer. I know someone who had taken engineering and they said it was VERY VERY hard and that you need to be very good in math and science. He also said that almost half of the class dropped out of engineering the first year because it was so challenging. But he said it is fun.

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Restraining orders are just another way of saying I love you.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 11:25 AM
If you absolutely love math and are a prodigy at it you might have a chance. Why not try an alternate route. Such as themeing for rides, etc. Sort of like an imagineer. With that you may have a better chance.

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http://www.mallmonkeys.com

*** This post was edited by Colonel Sanders on 12/30/2002. ***

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Monday, December 30, 2002 12:51 PM

PittDesigner said:
Pretty much any Big 10 school (the football conference) is a good engineering school.

So, how are those MIT Beavers doing this season? I heard they're going to clean up and take the big trophy home. . .

Name isn't everything, but most schools have earned their reputations. First, decide on what type of engineering you're interested in (there are *a lot* of flavors of engineering), then look into what you can afford, and then consider the school's prestige. Engineering isn't for everyone, it's a whole ton of work, it's very pessimistic, moderately boring, but it pays well.

Designing coasters is a whole lot of number crunching. It's not all that glamorous.

~ Maddie, feigning interest in both football and engineering. :)

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~~~ Maddy ~~~
"Stalkee: The woman everybody wants"

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Monday, December 30, 2002 1:21 PM

I second Wahoo Skipper's comment. I doubt there are many people on this site that had the same dream as you. I, however, have changed my plans from being designer, to manager, to public relations. I want Raven Maven's job, but not at HW.

I want a REAL challenge. I want to work for Little A-merrick-a with advertising and getting the poeple to roll in so we could expand. Other parks I would like to work at in the same position is Lake Compounce, Lakemont, or other smaller parks. I only know of one person going into that field for sure, is STchick around?

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The below statement is true.
The above statement is false.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 1:33 PM

SFSL_Guy07 said:
I plan on designing wooden roller coasters. Does anybody have any comments on where would be the best to work for? I wanted to work for CCI, but thats not happenning now is it, lol.


Work for S&S! It's American-based, and now makes woodies! (I don't know how hard it is to get in to S&S, it's simply a suggestion. It COULD be a bad idea, so don't put all your trust in me.)

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Two friends, extremely in love with the same girl. She hates them both, but likes a third friend. (You think I'm advertising a reality show? That's my life!)

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Monday, December 30, 2002 1:36 PM
lol, American based. You're joking right.

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'out the 100Base-T, through the router, down the OC3, over the leased line, off the bridge, past the firewall......nothin' but Net.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 3:10 PM
I don't know if I'm missing something, but what's so funny about American-based?

A lot of the major coaster companies that kids want to work for are located in Europe (such as B&M and Intamin), and I think that swimmerkev was just pointing out that S&S is located on American soil.

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Monday, December 30, 2002 4:43 PM
Ya, ever since riding the boss at sfsl, my home park, i knew i wanted to grow up and design these wild rides. Would being and imagineer be more for flat rides and shows though, because disney doesnt have a big roller coaster lineup, although it would be a great job.
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Monday, December 30, 2002 4:44 PM
How much do those guys get paid?
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Monday, December 30, 2002 4:59 PM

The designing team has many parts to it. You don't just join now. The degree you pick will lead you into a different part of the team. Sounds like you want to be in the Research & Development department so you best get a degree in structual engineering. Now a days, you can end up at the head of the team without a degree at all. My pastor is a profound engineer in Boston with only a high school diploma.

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Lake Compounce-So Fresh and So Clean Clean

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Monday, December 30, 2002 5:07 PM
Come to think of it, i think working for disney, or universal, and creating a ride experience would be more fun. What degrees would you need doing that?
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