Kozmo's Kurves

Monday, August 3, 2009 5:16 PM
Mamoosh's avatar

Video of KoKu in action.

+0
Monday, August 3, 2009 5:34 PM
Jeff's avatar

Now that I've seen it in action, in high definition no less, I'm even more stunned that there's a three-page thread on it.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Music: The Modern Gen-X - Video

+0
Monday, August 3, 2009 8:33 PM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

I just didn't want to be the first to say it.

I suppose that speaks volumes about Knoebels though, when a kiddie coaster gets this much interest.


+0
Monday, August 3, 2009 8:54 PM
phoenixphan :-)'s avatar

<Flame worthy rant removed for censorship issues> ;-)

I will agree with Gonch that is does say something that Knoebels can pull in so much attention over a kiddie coaster. Its been all over the regional media, as well and buzz outside of the coaster enthusiast sites. Makes me feel happier with my home park :-D


Real men ride wood... coasters that is!
+0
Monday, August 3, 2009 9:00 PM
Mamoosh's avatar

It speaks more about the ride it replaced, the special way the park operated it (especially during events) and the big shoes...err, footprint any replacement would have to fill.

+0
Monday, August 3, 2009 11:00 PM
DantheCoasterman's avatar

Will someone please explain to me why HSTC was so amazing?

My local fair has had the same model for the past few years, and I don't think it's anything special at all...


-Daniel

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 12:33 AM
Mamoosh's avatar

The ride itself wasn't special, it was how the park operated it (especially during events) The lift chain was kept running fast, meaning that each lap got faster and faster.

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 2:41 AM

phoenixphan :-) said:
Only complaint was that the cars are a little tight of a fit for larger riders, more so that HSTC was.

I was just there tonight and I have no idea how that complaint came about. I'm tall and I had no problem, my girlfriend is full-figured and she had no problem. The only thing I can say is that we didn't try getting in the same car, but since I'm skinny I suspect that we might have been able to if we had to (although, as with HSTC, they do not assign seats.) There might've been some uncomfortable laterals in that case, but nothing worse than on any other ride with laterals.

Unlike HSTC, I didn't smash my knees because the cars are more open, and I didn't smash my back because the hills aren't violent. I thought that the individual lap bar, being a T-bar, would be hazardous to my crotch, but both bar and crotch stayed where they were supposed to.

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 9:36 AM
Jason Hammond's avatar

DantheCoasterman said:
My local fair has had the same model for the past few years

Sorry, but HSTC was the only coaster ever built by The Overland Company. There was not one at your local fair. The coaster in the video was buitl by Miler. Though this is a custom design, it looks like like your typical kiddie. My first impression says this doesn't appear to be as good as HSTC.


854 Coasters, 34 States, 7 Countries
http://www.rollercoasterfreak.com My YouTube

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 9:44 AM
DantheCoasterman's avatar

I didn't say it was built by the same company...but I swear to you that a kiddie coaster at my county fair had the exact same layout, was the same size, and ran with Miler trains. I rode it last week, and didn't find anything about it to be very exciting at all.


-Daniel

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 12:29 PM
Mamoosh's avatar

If only someone had said that it was the way Knoebels operated the ride, especially during events.

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 12:43 PM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

Mamoosh said:
The ride itself wasn't special, it was how the park operated it (especially during events) The lift chain was kept running fast, meaning that each lap got faster and faster.

I'm not sure I understand how that would work. The train at the top of the lift could only be going as fast as the chain, so how did each lap get faster and faster?


+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 12:47 PM
Jason Hammond's avatar

^Cartoon Physics of course. :)


854 Coasters, 34 States, 7 Countries
http://www.rollercoasterfreak.com My YouTube

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 1:09 PM
phoenixphan :-)'s avatar

Mamoosh said:
If only someone had said that it was the way Knoebels operated the ride, especially during events.

Its not the layout... its the way Knoebels operated the ride, especially during events. There - now someone said it! LOL

Now as far as how they made the coaster "faster". Two things to keep in mind - first the train was full of, well, "fully grown adults". More mass = greater speed. As well if you were to notice, the lift speed was operated by a manual throttle. During PPP I noticed many times the ride-op pulling the throttle position out of its "track" and pushing it beyond its normal (and probly recommended) range.


Real men ride wood... coasters that is!
+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 2:20 PM
Mamoosh's avatar

Lord Gonchar said: I'm not sure I understand how that would work. The train at the top of the lift could only be going as fast as the chain, so how did each lap get faster and faster?

The speed of the chain lift isn't a constant, it's manually-operated. During an event the ride op would slowly increase the lift speed with each circuit. And then on the very last circuit the operator would bring the train to a l---o---n---g.....s---l---o---w....c---r---a---w---l over the lift. So slow that it felt as if the train was almost balanced.

Good times ;)

+0
Tuesday, August 4, 2009 2:51 PM

Schiff, Molina, and Miler all built coasters with a similar oval layout. The HSTC had a different car design and according to RCDB had a lift height of eighteen feet which would be higher than the standard coaster built by the other companies. Several years ago Miler changed the track design and also introduced the helix element into their coasters.

+0
Wednesday, August 5, 2009 12:39 AM
phoenixphan :-)'s avatar

The speed of the chain lift isn't a constant, it's manually-operated. During an event the ride op would slowly increase the lift speed with each circuit. And then on the very last circuit the operator would bring the train to a l---o---n---g.....s---l---o---w....c---r---a---w---l over the lift. So slow that it felt as if the train was almost balanced.

Good times ;)

Antici..... pation!


Real men ride wood... coasters that is!
+0
Wednesday, August 5, 2009 12:58 PM
Acoustic Viscosity's avatar

But even on a regular day, the little hops on HSTC seemed to have more kick to them than on any other kiddie coaster. Per haps it was the train design, but I would always get jolted out of my seat on those little hills, much like nearly every hill on Big Dipper at Geauga Lake.


AV Matt
Long live the Big Bad Wolf

+0
Thursday, August 6, 2009 10:15 PM

Phoenixphan... Great imitation of Tim Curry...

+0
Friday, August 7, 2009 12:51 AM
phoenixphan :-)'s avatar

We just got back from a quick evening trip to Knoebels. After a 30 minute wait for KoKu we got in seats one and two. There is sufficent room for two adults, but it seems that the park policy is one per car.

I have to say I still miss the manual operation of HSTC, but KoKu is definitely a worth replacement. There was a bit of stong laterals, and some nice pops of air after the helix. Is definitely a "family" coaster, and not just a kiddie ride.

Otherwise I was nice to see the park filled with guests even during an evening mid-week. Phoenix and Twister were both running great, and had two train operations until park closing. It was a nice four hours, and I am looking even more forward to PPP.


Real men ride wood... coasters that is!
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2020, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...