Is there any past and present theme park workers ?

Monday, January 6, 2003 3:47 PM

I have read many post concerning ride ops. And I was wonderign if everyone on these forums just do ops or if there are people on here that do the real work. Jobs such as Food service, grounds, retail, life guarding, etc...

I have for the past three years worked Food service sorta (never worked for the park jsut worked there) at SFSTL. Its a great job and beats ops any day. How could anyone do the samething over and over hundreds a tiems a day.

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"Would you like a sports bottle with that? Its only an extra 2.35$ and your soul. For the extra cost you will receive the privilege to fill your cup with soda for only an additional $3.00. And if you act right now we'll throw in a straw (may be broken) an

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Monday, January 6, 2003 3:53 PM
Glad to hear someone call it real work. I've worked at Kings Island for the last five years in food service. I started my days at the employee cafeteria and worked my way up to supervisor then moved on to many different locations. I know rides people deal with stupid people but I think they get even more stupid once they get in line for food and we have to work longer hours. Though I would say from my other jobs outside the park in the off season I've never had as much fun as I do at the park.

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Wood Rules!

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Monday, January 6, 2003 3:56 PM
Ride Operation is definetly real work. We have to get to work before the park opens, and stay afterwards. We have to clean the ride and ride area all the time. Often times, I would still be cleaning a ride until 11 or 12 at night, when the park closed at 10. So it is definetly real work. I also worked as a food vendor when I was 15, it wasn't as hard in my opinion.

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Rob


"Some people spend an entire LIFETIME wondering if they made a DIFFERENCE. The MARINES don't have that problem." -President Reagan 1985

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:10 PM
At 15 you are allowed to do anything. Try working there now and see if it is easier.

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Wood Rules!

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:11 PM

No, I have done just about every theme park type of job and ride ops is the most mundane of them all. They appear to be the glorious jobs but let's be honest: Anyone can lift a bar, raise a thumb and push a button.

The unsung heroes of amusment parks are the custodians, food service workers, graveyard crews, etc.

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:20 PM

I have worked at GL 9 years ago as a sweep for a season. I'm also thinking of appling for a ride maintenece(full time is possible) job at either SFWoA or CP for this up coming season.

Edit: Working as a sweep was one of the best jobs I ever had. And the girls, oh wait, this is a family site, I won't go there then, ;)

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Is it May yet??

http://www.zerognetwork.com

*** This post was edited by shaggszgn on 1/6/2003. ***

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:20 PM
To an extent yes. But can just any person constantly watch every safety aspect of the ride down to every last detail if/ when a breakdown occurs? I think not, and thats the type of ride op that I pride myself on being. A safety system can only take you so far, but the human element built into each and every ride is so much that it takes a smart and quick thinking person to move in and out trains safely at my ride, GASM at SFoG and my secondary ride SUF at SFoG. I'm sure most of us enthuasiasts can do operating easily b/c we pride ourselves in the job we do, however its by far not just "raising a thumb and pressing a button". Calling the job i do day in and out that makes me sick.

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Acrophobia-"So who up there is scared(everybody screams)? I want everyone who is scared to hold their hands out..."DROP

*** This post was edited by Chris the Coaster Freak on 1/6/2003. ***

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:24 PM
Ride Operation is definetly real work. We have to get to work before the park opens, and stay afterwards. We have to clean the ride and ride area all the time. Often times, I would still be cleaning a ride until 11 or 12 at night, when the park closed at 10. So it is definetly real work. I also worked as a food vendor when I was 15, it wasn't as hard in my opinion.

Trust me Food service workers have to get there before you (not everybody) and leave after 11 12 or even 1 like you do. Try getting up at 5am so you can be at work by 6 to spin hundreds of bag of cotten candy and then work through the day at a stand and not be allowed to go home till 11 at night.

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"Would you like a sports bottle with that? Its only an extra 2.35$ and your soul. For the extra cost you will receive the privilege to fill your cup with soda for only an additional $3.00. And if you act right now we'll throw in a straw (may be broken) an

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:26 PM

Ok, you take things a little too seriously. I will admit that there are some ride op jobs that are "challenging". Working a spiel ride, a manual ferris wheel, a go-kart ride, etc I would say present some physical challenges.

Most other rides/coasters keep you busy with guests and with dispatch but the work itself isn't all that difficult.

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:27 PM

Let's not forget that without these people who can lift a bar, raise a thumb, and push a button, there would be no rides, hence no amusement park, hence no work for those "unsung heroes". I know many park's have different training procedures, but I know a good majority of them require these ride ops to be trained and take tests, some of them being quite difficult/long (Partcularly ride operators of major coasters). To me, it'd be much harder fully understanding how to operate a first generation freefall, then say, sweeping up garbage or making burgers. And I'm in no way bashing the non-rides people of the amusement industry, in fact, I can't say if their job is harder because I've never had that position before... but it shouldn't be a competition anyway, a good amusement park will have good employees in all areas.

Speaking from my experience, I loved every minute of being a ride op, and while sometimes the basic mechanics of it was repetitive, there was always plenty of twists and turns when it came to guests and shutdown/breakdown situations. You wanna talk about repetitive, try being a telemarketer lol. And in my case, working hard and having fun, led me to be a supervisor, where I now have no more repetitive days and enjoy my job very much.

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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:36 PM
I worked at BGW the year of Alpengeist(97). I was an "area-host" of San Marco, Italy. I had to sweep and stuff like that. Operating the little balloons and little gliders were part of my job duties also! After working there I realized how dangerous things can be with the operation of themepark rides...even the kiddie ones!
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Monday, January 6, 2003 4:59 PM

ALF is cool:

Only midnight when the park closed at 10? Thats nothing. Last year at PKI during the Bring a Friend Nighmare (thats what I am calling it) we closed the park at 11. I minor violated at 1:30, and I waited for my crew, and they werent done until almost 3 in the morning. Most of us had to work the early shift the next morning too.

Every job in the amusement park is equally important. Each job, no matter how big or small, leans on another. For example, without ride ops you dont have running rides. Without food/drinks, people will not go to the park. Without Ecology, people would complain about the junk and not come to a trashy park.

Although running rides looks like its mudane, where else do you have to think about safety aspects of at least 80 people? I know in foods, its a lot of hard work because you do see more guests than rides do, but all those guests have to do is order from a menu and pay. But, where else in the park do you have to do quick math (although easy IMO) on the fly? Where else do you have to make a pizza exactly to specifications? It is a lot of hard work, but you cant say its harder than other areas. Just certain areas are harder in certain aspects than others.

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SOB crew in twenty 02
111 SOB laps, and wishing the park was still open

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Monday, January 6, 2003 5:04 PM
Nicey said SOB_tom.... no need for anyone to judge what other people do in the same park. Although, I'll still maintain that it wouldn't be an amusement park without rides.... otherwise these "real" workers would just be running a mall - merchandise, food, security, sweepers, games. =)
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Monday, January 6, 2003 5:04 PM
Well, Dick Kinsel started out in foods.....

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- "I used to be in the audio/visual club, but I was kicked out because of my views on Vietnam........and I was stealing projectors" - Homer Simpson

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Monday, January 6, 2003 5:08 PM

True anyone can "lift a bar, raise a thumb, or push a button" but it takes a very very special kind of person to serve guests on a continual basis with a high level of enthusiasm, excitement and service. I worked at Cedar Point for a full summer and then a month of the next summer, and let me tell you the pride I felt just of being a part of that park, and being on certain rides was amazing. When I was doing spiels on the Magnum it was innately felt that you had a certain level of respect and honor you needed to uphold. Even more so, you just know the guests are expecting something better out of you. Finally, when you deliver the experience they know that is expected, and even go beyond that with the small things it just truly is a rewarding experience. There is nothing I loved more then making guests days specials just with good quick, yet cordial service and being enthusiastic on spiels.

wahoo skipper said:

No, I have done just about every theme park type of job and ride ops is the most mundane of them all. They appear to be the glorious jobs but let's be honest: Anyone can lift a bar, raise a thumb and push a button.

The unsung heroes of amusment parks are the custodians, food service workers, graveyard crews, etc.


*** This post was edited by JasonPSU20 on 1/6/2003. ***

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Monday, January 6, 2003 5:15 PM
I have to agree with chiller1472.... being a ride op is a very difficult job.... We have to take a safety test just to get into the department, and then for each individual ride that we work we have to take a different test, and that's just to be an attendant.... To become an actual op we must take a test with usually about 9 essays. To start up the ride every morning we must climb 230 ft up the lift in any type of weather (climbing that thing on a cold day with the wind blowing is the worst) and then having to sit up there for at least 45 mins, maybe more if there are errors, untill you are told to hit the buttons up there. And then running around the station trying to make the line move as fast as possible in 100 degree weather, sweat dripping down your face.... not pleasent

Flippin burgers and making fries aren't repetitive??!! Or what about standing at metal decectors at the front gate with a stick checkin peoples bags??? With ride ops we have to deal with break downs where we have to deal with paniced and angry guests. Now that's hard work

BTW chiller1472 is the best supervisor i've ever seen. He He

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Monday, January 6, 2003 6:11 PM

"Real" work is standing there in the hot sun 65 hours a week, dealing with people that have no concernfor their actions, for their lives, the lives of others on the rides, or the ops lives for that matter. Dealing with pissy people because they dont want to wait in line just like everyone else in the park, cause stress among others waiting in line and hold up operation because they cant fathom why you cant fit 8 people in a boat that has only six seats. The "Real" work is being called a racist because you dont allow an infant on a ride because you would rather not have to jump in the water to get them out, or wtch them be run over by a rollercoaster train because they were too small for the restraints to hold them in properly. "Real" work is having the presence of mind and care to stop operating a ride when you sense a potentially dangerous situation, then having to deal with the 2 hours worth of people in line because you inconvenienced them by shutting down a ride instead of waiting for one of the arms to fall off, or a cable to snap. I'm sorry if you get up a little earlier or stay a little later to squeegee the floors and wash the grills out, but I would consider a bunch of people complaining about the price of a funnel cake for 65 hours a week a vacation compared to some of the things I have seen, prevented, or been called over the past 5 years. "real" work...ha.

-Tink, who hates her winter job, and really wanted to rant for a few minutes. :)

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Monday, January 6, 2003 6:16 PM
Off note, I think there are plenty more jobs outside the amusement industry that would make what we say "real" jobs are look like nothing.

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"If two coaster trains almost hit each other, why is it called a near miss and not a near hit?"

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Monday, January 6, 2003 6:20 PM

Its teamwork guys. All of you working for an amusement park have one common goal, and that is to make the guests experience as satisfying as possible.

Whether that be a ride-op, food worker, games worker, sweep, janitorial, security, guest relations, show performer, landscaper, wardrobe, etc, etc.

No-one is more superior to anyone else. This applies to amusement parks or any other kind of business. The part that you play makes a difference and impacts the bottomline of any business that you choose to work for.

Remember this and realize it whether you choose to make the amusement park industry your choice for a career or any other career you choose in the future.

'Chitown'== Who was a food worker at SFGAm back in 1987

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2 superheroes in Gurnee next season? Oh the humanity.

*** This post was edited by Chitown on 1/6/2003. ***

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Monday, January 6, 2003 6:24 PM
For crying out loud this isn't I'm better than you because I do more work or I work harder. It's about if you have worked. Who cares how hard you toil and sweat.
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