First water coaster(revealed)

Friday, December 14, 2001 1:13 PM
The world's firsts water coaster was not actualy Atlantis,it was infact the world's first steel coaster,The Matterhorn at DisneyLand. I've looked at several pics and the ending has a splashdown at the bottom.

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What in the world is in that bag?Watch u got in that bag!?!?!?!?!?!?!

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Friday, December 14, 2001 1:20 PM
A "water coaster" is a hybrid between a log flume and a rollercoaster. There is a log flume section (no track) and then a rollercoaster section (or the other way around).  Just because there is a splash down dosen't make it a "water coaster" (in the general context)
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Friday, December 14, 2001 1:44 PM
There are splashdowns on wooden coasters also, I believe there is one in the US.  As far as I know there are only three true water coasters: Journey to Atlantis, Buzzsaw Falls, and the new one in Europe.
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Friday, December 14, 2001 9:06 PM
Blazing Fury at Dollywood has a splashdown.
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Saturday, December 15, 2001 8:01 AM
There is also Poseidon at Europa Park, and I believe I saw this one in Japan whose name escapes me.

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Welcome to Six Flags Great America, home of the fastlane and delay-ja vu! We have now officially been deemed the world-wide wait!

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Saturday, December 15, 2001 10:08 AM
I have a question about true water coasters, ok, if they have like a flume part...how do they get back on track properly?
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Rob

"The doctor said I wouldn't have as many nose bleeds if I could just keep my finger out of there!" -Ralph

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Saturday, December 15, 2001 10:19 AM
Rob,

During that coasterthon they had on TLC, they showed how it worked.  Pretty simple, though I don't remember it too well.  Just think of the ends of the tracks like cones and the car is lined up with it and on it goes.  Similar to how rapids gets the boats onto the lift, it "lines it up" so it'll fit right.  That's what it basically does.

Now, how to they take care of splashdowns on woodies?  Must be hard.

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"If two coaster trains almost hit each other, why is it called a near miss and not a near hit?"

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Saturday, December 15, 2001 12:17 PM
You would think that splashdowns would be tremendously detrimental on coaster trains.  What do they do?  Wipe them down every pass???

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This is totally cool, if you ask me.

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Saturday, December 15, 2001 6:49 PM
I heard that mantenience on Matterhorn was pretty tough.  You can imagine what immersion in water every few minutes will do to metal coaster parts!

I don't really consider it a water coaster, however.  It is just regular track which is a little below the water's surface.

Some people call Perilous Plunge a water coaster.  I'm not one of them, but I can see why they say that.  The only part of the ride whice is actually in water is after the drop, the only time its not on a track is on the turnaround into the station.

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Knotts 2002...ready when you are!

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Saturday, December 15, 2001 7:13 PM
Would Adventureland's new coaster Saw Mill Splash be considered a water coaster or a coaster at all?
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Just wait till next year!
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Sunday, December 16, 2001 8:26 AM
It works like this.  The boats have wheels, the wheels are the three normal coaster wheels, except they are on the side of the boat instead of under it.  it uses the underwheels and guide wheels when floating through the water, but when it gets onto the track, it's like a tapered track at the beginning so it can get into position where the wheels are, then it gets to normal size so the wheels fit around it.  then it moves like a coaster.  It's very cool.  If I go to Sea World over winter break, I'll take some pics of JTA and put them on a website.  It makes a lot of sense if you really think about it, it's very hard to explain.
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Is a tomato a fruit or a vegetable?
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Sunday, December 16, 2001 9:45 AM
Here is a pic of Wildcat at Frontier City, It used to have a splash down at the end but they drained it.
http://www.rcdb.com/installationgallery155.htm?Picture=3

*** This post was edited by CONNER on 12/16/2001. ***

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 9:53 AM
Valleyfair Fan, Saw Mill Slpash is not a coaster, it's a rapids ride.  Sorry.

Hey Conner, I thought that "splashdown" was a simulation.  Just like the splash that Anaconda makes when it goes underwater.  Can anyone confirm that it did indeed go underwater.  I have a hard time believing that wood track being submerged would work.

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- Peabody

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 11:43 AM
Some are simulated splashdowns.  Like Big Thunder Mountain at Disneyland.  When the coaster goes over the track, it put pressure into jets of water which squirt out.

Matterhorn really does go through water!

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 12:20 PM
Matterhorn really does go through the water.  As far as I know, it's the only one that REALLY does.  Can anyone offer solid evidence of another genuine splashdown that currently exists?  (Premier and Mack watercoasters excluded)
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- Peabody
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Sunday, December 16, 2001 12:21 PM
The splashdown on Matterhorn is definently real.  After the splashdown leading into the station all the track is rusted and looks pretty bad.  I'm suprised Disney hasn't fixed that yet.

*** This post was edited by mamba on 12/16/2001. ***

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 1:39 PM
it definetly is real, I went in November, and I rode front row of Matterhorn, and I got wet, I was soo pissed, because I didnt think I would get wet.
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Rob

"The doctor said I wouldn't have as many nose bleeds if I could just keep my finger out of there!" -Ralph

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 5:19 PM
The splash down on Disneyland's Matterhorn is actually designed as a braking system to bleed away excess energy from the cars as they finish up the ride. 

So, in that respect, it's a good thing; and isn't detrimental at all.

As far as water coasters are concerned - I was under the impression that they still ran on a track at the bottoms of their larger drops.   I'm not really familiar with them, so does this mean to suggest that there are other, log flume-like parts of the ride?

~ Michael ~

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Sunday, December 16, 2001 5:29 PM
PointMan, I got to ride Blazing Fury in '80 (World's Fair trip), thought it was a great fun dark ride/coaster...I'd love to ride it again.
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PoTP acolyte - remove fear to reply
Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
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Monday, December 17, 2001 12:30 AM
Hey

Even without the matterhorn JTA wasent yhe first Water Coaster. There are 2 in Jpana that have been there for years and years (early 80's)

http://www.coaster-network.com/bm/japan/water1.jpg

http://www.coaster-network.com/bm/japan/water2.jpg

http://www.coaster-network.com/bm/japan/water3.jpg

Although the corses are quite short with only 2 or 3 drops and then a flume section, They still can be considered as Water Coasters.

And there was even one much further back in the time of the classic coasters but i forget the name. anyone know it?

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