Bored teen in Kentucky builds his own rollercoaster

Tuesday, December 5, 2017 9:46 PM

Cute quick news story about a Teen in Kentucky that builds a roller coaster in his back yard.

http://www.bbc.com/news/av/world-us-canada-42230665/bored-teen-in-k...lercoaster


+1Loading
Friday, December 8, 2017 1:41 AM
LostKause's avatar

What a cool kid! I'd love to see more of this coaster.

I tried to build on when I was about ten years old with the help of my cousin. We gave up after about six hours, because we had no idea what we were doing.


+0
Friday, December 8, 2017 3:09 PM

Very cool indeed.

You see lots of backyard coaster in the USA, can such things be built wthout any permits? I know of a bpy in Germany that wanted to built one but he had to take it down because he had no permit and it was deemed to be way too dangerous etc.

Not so long ago I found a channel of a man bulding a rollercoaster, just a few days ago he put up the video of him riding it.

just look on his channel


+0
Saturday, December 9, 2017 1:15 AM
99er's avatar

Kentucky, eh? This kid should meet up with this guy. They could go places.


-Chris
Remember, if you're arguing on the internet, you've already lost.
YouTube | Twitter | Website

+0
Saturday, December 9, 2017 5:38 PM

Where you live in the US and whether or not your neighbors are jerks will determine whether or not you need a permit ;). I'm sure most places don't have rules specifically covering miniature roller coasters so it depends on what the building department decides to label the coaster as. Playground equipment? If you live in a rural area you can get away with things like this easier.

Last edited by Paisley, Saturday, December 9, 2017 5:41 PM
+0
Monday, December 11, 2017 3:27 PM

It largely depends on the municipal/county zoning laws, and even then it can be pretty loosey-goosey depending on the state. I know, for example, that as my property is zoned purely residential without any historic restrictions, I don't need a permit for a free-standing deck as long as it's at least 3 feet off any property line not connected to the house in any way shape or manner (though incidentally, if I was building it in connection with an above-ground pool installation, it would also be subject to zoning permitting and inspection). And that's in regulation-heavy NJ. In other states that favor a ... less restrictive form of land use regulation, they might not even be that strict regarding the building envelope. The bigger issue is whether or not a homeowner's policy will cover the inevitable injuries to any non-residents riding it.

Last edited by Lemur, Monday, December 11, 2017 3:28 PM
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2017, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...