YouTube attention whore arrested at Magic Kingdom

Tuesday, March 27, 2018 8:53 AM

This isn't really news, but it's amusing just because someone wrote "YouTube star" in a non-ironic way.

http://www.wesh.com/article/youtube-star-arrested-outside-magic-kingdom/19600239

Last edited by Jeff, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 1:17 PM
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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:29 AM

If by "Magic Kingdom" you mean "Stuttgart airport" and by "YouTube star" you mean "drunken pilot" and by "arrested" you mean "left 100 passengers stranded," this article is spot on.

;)

Here's the correct article: http://www.wesh.com/article/youtube-star-arrested-outside-magic-kingdom/19600239

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:34 AM

I just scrolled down one click to find it...

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:40 AM

It's random. I clicked the original link a second time and the attention whore article didn't appear anywhere in the sidebar.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 10:59 AM

I don't know anything about the guy, so I can't make too many assumptions - but from the brief bit I watched, he seems like kind of a douche.

That said, some stories are saying that his camera bag walked off while he was going through the detectors, and this all started with him freaking out about his equipment, SD cards full of video and photos, and $2000 cash being stolen. Why you'd carry that much cash, and in your camera bag, is beyond me..

Obviously not enough to go on, but if his stuff was truly stolen, that sucks.

Or, he's just a douche.

Or Maverick.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 11:03 AM

I got lucky then.
And all for an article that further confirms that park security is an unnecessary scam!!1!
;)

We stayed at a hotel in Amsterdam where Wavy Davy, also a YouTube “Star”, was staying the weekend for a journalist’s conference. He was a jackass. And... is that journalism?

But in YouTube star’s defense, I understand it can be quite lucrative. Especially with product placement. If you have a large following and Pepsi notices you keep a can in sight, or if Subaru notices you drive one, they pay enormous sums.

Those ‘abandoned places’ channels are popular. I haven’t heard of this guy, but Adam the Woo has a large following.
And I follow several YouTubers. There are park related channels, natch, but I also have ASMR and there’s no end of ASMR-inducing vids. Some intentional and some unintentional. If I ever run into Gentle Whispering Maria I think I’ll probably faint.
I follow a number of slot machine players, too. You can watch these guys and gals hit the jackpot over and over. Who knew?

I think YouTube counts as one of the world’s greatest inventions ever. Well, since the Internet.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:08 PM

Jeff said:

...someone wrote "YouTube star" in a non-ironic way.

"Get off my lawn!" moment.

I'm gonna take the other side on this...just because.

This is absolutely a thing. There are YouTube personalities that make a fortune and are well known by the entire generation of kids logging on to watch them. These kids barely watch television - YouTube is their television and the people making the videos are their 'stars' for better or worse. There are more people watching some of these personalities on YouTube on a regular basis than watching 'successful' shows on TV each week.

This is a "(Fill in television/movie star name) arrested at Disney!" headline for the post-millenials. We're just old.

I think the biggest difference is that traditionally (hollywood, the music industry, etc) you had to run a gauntlet of sorts that vetted you and prepared you in a way to be a 'star' - the barrier is much lower (non-existent?) on YouTube and these people tend to be more likely to suck at the "reasonably handle the notoriety" part of things.

Last edited by Lord Gonchar, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 12:30 PM
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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 1:19 PM

Dude, you don't have to be your usual Mr. Contrarian self, I get it. "Star" doesn't mean anything anymore. People have been famous for being famous for awhile now, so the bar is pretty low. Dudes like this are not artists or moguls or whatever, they're just attention whores.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 1:54 PM

Yeah, I know. I just don't think you can dismiss it as easily as you want. To me, it feels a lot like the old generational thing where we don't understand what or why those behind us value what they do.

In the traditional sense of the youth and popular culture and what matters, this dude is a "star" as much as anyone we were a fan of when we were kids...and our parents would have likely acted the same way if the news covered one of them flipping out at the airport.

From the other side, seeking fame is hardly a new thing. Like we're saying, the bar has simply been lowered (isn't that kind of the whole "internet levels the playing field" equality thing?). Anyone that sought fame in the ways of their time meets the definition of attention whore as suggested here.

I guess I'm just not nearly as put off by calling popular YouTube personalities, stars.

That's all.

(These hacks and their talkies! It really chuffs my knickers. All the real talent is in Vaudeville, I tell you!) - works best read aloud in an old-timey voice.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:16 PM

I can dismiss the poor tastes of others. I don't think it's generational. We had Paris Hilton, and she was no better.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:39 PM

Yeah, exactly. Every generation has people that find fame and fortune in spite of themselves.

It's the YouTube thing that's generational. Now it's possible to become a 'star' by being on YouTube. Just because I might not like it or don't get it doesn't invalidate it, quite the opposite - it likely shows my age in regards to how, where and what youth-driven pop culture stuff is happening.

I'm cool with that. As a guy in his mid-40's whose oldest kid turns 21 this year, I don't exactly expect to have my finger firmly on the pulse of anything that matters.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:43 PM

I generally agree with Gonch, but the barrier is much lower, the 15 minutes of fame have shrunk to 30 seconds, and the audience is much more distributed. In the same way that the current music industry doesn't have long standing, singularly ubiquitous stars like Michael Jackson or Madonna because everyone has access to whatever they want, whenever they want it. I guess maybe Taylor Swift is getting there?

But "back in my day" stardom was a lot rarer, lasted a lot longer, and reached a lot more people. It seems there a way more YouTube stars and fewer people know about any particular one than traditional media stars.

Last edited by ApolloAndy, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 2:45 PM
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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 5:46 PM

I don’t see it so much as an old thing-new thing we adults should worry about. I constantly see it as more of a “why the hell didn’t I think of that?” thing.
Especially when I see someone like Michelle Phan who took simple makeup tutorials and turned it into a multi million dollar business. Like 50 million. On YouTube.
And to think for every single hobby, every single interest, and every single question that one might ask, there’s at least one YouTube star that’s risen to fame and fortune. That’s mind blowing.
Side note- The other day I learned how to make a tres leches cake to serve for one of my Famous Candlelight Suppers. (By the way, I won’t be doing that again, I’ll just go to Chuy’s.) Point being, if you need it you can find it there or it doesn’t exist.
Not too long ago one of the daytime talk shows had “Millionaires who are under 21” as a subject. They introduced and interviewed these kids and three out of the four had made their money on YouTube.
So maybe due to the sheer volume YouTube stardom seems like so many flashes in the pan. And we all know from the various coaster channels that some are better than others. And we have a hard time equating that viewership to that of the network tv we grew up watching. But I know that Michelle Phan did the right thing. Despite the fact that she’s gorgeous, she would be behind a makeup counter somewhere if it weren’t for that generation’s tv.

Best. Invention. Ever.

Last edited by RCMAC, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 5:59 PM
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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 5:53 PM

Our house tends to be Jeffree Star fans when it comes to the make-up based channels on YouTube.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 5:58 PM

Oh, I forgot about her. James Charles is another one, the first male Cover Girl ever. From YouTube.
I love makeovers, and it’s easy to fall down the rabbit hole watching them.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 6:22 PM

YouTube live streamers is the new "star". Ice Poseidon corners that market. YouTube video's are old school. Live streamers is what the kids want these days.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018 7:29 PM

I blame my generation (I'm 44) on all these stupid ass reality stars. If we would have never watched The Real World on MTV we would never have gotten the Kardashians or youtube stars. I guess we could blame MTV for not sticking with bad ass hair bands with hot women and fire exploding everywhere.

Last edited by Dale K, Tuesday, March 27, 2018 7:30 PM
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Wednesday, March 28, 2018 6:37 AM

The Ann Arbor News did a story on one of the Youtube stars a while back because people were asking who was the rich kid driving a Lamborghini around UM campus. He started a channel about used cars and bought the Lambo used with Youtube revenue.

And, god, yes, would we have thrown our TVs out if we had known The Real World would have led to Paris, the Kardashians, Real Housewives, and The Bachelor(ette). The strange twist is I use YouTube as my curated music stream to watch the music videos that MTV doesn't play that much anymore.

Now get off my lawn.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2018 12:09 PM

Wait, you guys are complaining about the vapid reality stars and TV shows now because you watched The Real World? I feel like I have more of a right to complain because I absolutely refused to watch that drivel. The concept to me, even back then, was dumb.

And yeah, I'm aware that "dumb" is subjective, considering the amount of money most of these people make.

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Wednesday, March 28, 2018 12:45 PM

I saw some merit in the original Real World at first, but by the third season, it was obvious that the entire thing was contrived because they had a list of personality types that wouldn't get along, and they checked the boxes every season (the country kid, the racist, the gay person, the musician, etc.).

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