worlds longest log flume ride.

Saturday, April 30, 2005 12:39 PM
What is the longest log flume in operation? I thought it was white water landing at cedarpoint, but it is listed as " one of the worlds longest water flume rides" at 2,370 feet long.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 12:55 PM
I don't know the numbers, but I'm almost positive it's Splash Mountain at the Disney parks. It is definitely the world's best flume ride!
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 1:12 PM
That might be. (Splash is one of my all time favorite rides.) Or it might be the one at Knotts. Dudley Do Right might be #2 or #3. *** Edited 4/30/2005 6:24:07 PM UTC by Peabody***
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 1:33 PM
Knott's has a great original flume. How do you think Disney came up with Splash Mountain? They had to out-do Knott's flume. Ironically, I also find the one at Magic Mountain to be really good too. Better than most of the coasters anyways. ;)

Wood Coaster Fan Club - "Sharing a Passion for the Classics" *** Edited 4/30/2005 5:33:24 PM UTC by Thrillerman***

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 3:11 PM
http://www.altontowerspark.info/attractions/mengland/logflume.html

I beleive the longest is the one in Alton Towers. When it opened it was the longest. It says it is 886 meters. Not sure what that is in feet. Sorry.

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 3:41 PM
^Multiply it times 3. So 2658 feet. :) I didn't go on AT's flume last week. Maybe next time...
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 3:49 PM
Multiplying by 3 is a good estimate. (2658 feet)

3.28 is more accurate. (2906 feet)

Or you can just go to Google and enter "886 meters to feet"

It says: 886 meters = 2906.82415 feet

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 3:49 PM
^^ But you have to remember, 3 feet is not exactly 1 meter. It's a little different. :)

Ooo.. 10 seconds off. ;) *** Edited 4/30/2005 7:50:26 PM UTC by Corkscrewy***

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 4:15 PM
A meter is about 39 inches.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 5:31 PM
ok?

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 6:54 PM
Dudley at IOA sure seems long.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 9:08 PM
While the topic is Log Flumes...
Has there ever been a situtation where a couple of boats drifted to close to each other on CP's White Water Landing? And is that the primary purpose of the double shoot design?

http://www.pointbuzz.com/gallery.aspx?a=75 *** Edited 5/1/2005 1:11:11 AM UTC by jkpark***

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 9:30 PM
The primary purpose of the double shoot design has been discused before. The conclusion we came up with then was that it there were two shoots to properly handle all of the water at the top of the flume. You'll notice that all flumes with two shoots go directly from the trough straight down the hill where as those with a single shoot drop go up a lift hill (even if it is small) before the drop. To make a long story short, there are two shoots to properly handle the amount of water in the trough before the drop.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 10:27 PM
I've never been on WWL at CP. Do they have a thing to divert the boat down both sides of the shoot?

I know at Universal Studios, they use both sides of the shoot so that they can safely increase capacity of the ride. I would imagine that that was the original reason for making the shoot have two sides, perhaps they just never use it?

Knoebel's has a turnaround at the top before its drop, and it only has one shoot. (They do however have a small, "safety" lift (high enough to lift the boat out of the water current) to stop the boat if the one previous has yet to clear the end of the shoot.)

DorneyPark's TCM has no lift hill before its single shoot. (However it does have an overflow area for the water.)

Again, I'm unfamilar with WWL's design, I tried searching for the past topic on here too, but I think I'm just too stupid to find it.

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 11:01 PM
There was a collision on white water landing before......I think it was 3 or 4 years ago. The gate on the split before the drop did not close, thus two boats collided at the base of the drop.

There was a news story on here about it, but I cant seem to find it.

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Saturday, April 30, 2005 11:33 PM
I can't imagine that they'd build a separate splashdown just to manage the flow of water, especially considering that many log flumes manage just fine with 1 drop after a water-filled turnaround. If water overflow was a problem, they'd go the less expensive route and install a pipe or something, not another fiberglass section and deceleration trough. I was always under the impression that the dual trough design was implemented for traffic control reasons; instead of waiting for a boat to clear the bottom, the control system can simply send it down the alternate chute, thus doubling the capacity of the ride while keeping the boats safely separated where it counts.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 11:39 PM
The 2 flume idea was to alow more boats to flow down the chute. Since the incedent, they have reduced the number of boats and only use one side of the drop.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 11:39 PM
I've never seen both chutes being used at the same time. Even on hot August days where lines reach 1+ hours I've never seen both chutes used.
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Saturday, April 30, 2005 11:43 PM
They were used.......I used to work the ride when I worked at the point.
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Sunday, May 1, 2005 12:18 AM
When White Water Landing was introduced, it was billed as the world's longest Hydro Flume ride. The Hydro Flume was a particular model of water ride built by Arrow, a step up in capacity and design from their traditional log flume. The boats were larger, there was the double chute, and the loading was handled by a continuous-moving turntable. All these features were designed to increase capacity- something which CP is always looking for. (It was the perfect replacement for the outdated Shoot the Rapids) Other examples of such rides were installed at Magic Mountain, King's Island, Hershey, and I'm sure others. While WWL may not be the world's longest log ride, it may still stand as the world's longest Hydro Flume.
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