woodie model

Thursday, January 17, 2002 12:34 PM
im thinking of making a woodie model, not any particular design but i have one in mind! ill try to load a drawing of what im thinking of . Ive tried and failed at my new"water hose spine" idea. now what im asking is what do about a base to secure it all, and supplies that i could use, and or that you have used!
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Formaly Inverted of Danimation
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Thursday, January 17, 2002 1:51 PM
A good friend of mine builds working coaster models, he always begins with a 4 x 8 piece of plywood and reinforces the bottom with 2 x 4s along the perimeter and down the center.  He then sketches the basic layout of the ride on the base, landscapes all of the areas that will be landscaped beneath the ride, and then builds.

I'm afraid that's about as technical I can get about it, he knows what he is doing and I just stand there in awe!

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Thursday, January 17, 2002 3:46 PM
Fire away! I'd be glad to help ya! See my site for tips on building materials. Good luck, and I'd like to see your design.

Brad Sherman
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Don't.....look.....back! The Headless Horseman awaits you in 2002!
Model coasters and rides

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Friday, January 18, 2002 7:46 AM
ok if im using plywood how thick should i have it and how do i plant the balsa supports and or bents? im gonna load a pic soon
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Formaly Inverted of Danimation
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Friday, January 18, 2002 9:47 AM
The base really depends on the size of the model. It isn't critical for a small coaster. I'm building a small operating woodie that sits on a piece of 1/4 plywood (a scrap I had sitting around). It's plenty stable for the size of the project (18"X9"). Even something like foam core board would work.

For something larger I'd probably go with 1/2" or 3/4" plywood depending on what is hanging around in the scrap piles. Bracing is a good idea for something like a 4X8 sheet.

I glue most of the bents directly to the base but I do insert some of them into holes drilled into the base for extra stability.

Consider using basswood instead of balsa. It is much stiffer and isn't as fragile. The cost isn't too much higher. It is slightly more difficult to cut but I find it easier to work with overall.

You could consult some books on model railroad benchwork if you really want to get fancy. Especially if you want to include landscape features such as ponds, ravines, etc.

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everything's better with a banjo

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Friday, January 18, 2002 11:28 AM

thanks for all the help!:)! i think ill use the plywood! and the bass wood! ive been hopeing to start soon but the money is something i need help on! have to get that job ya know?!lol just keep the info comeing i cant ever have enough! thatnks alot
-ryan
p.s. since i cant get the pic up i will tell you. basiclly the train heads strait to the lift hill. and then at the top it falls and then heads up into a turnaround to the right after the turnaround it drops and hits a smaller hill and then a flat area (where the brakes would be) and turns right in to station!
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Formaly Inverted of Danimation
i cant get the pick up!sorry!
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Friday, January 18, 2002 5:47 PM
Sounds like a simple layout. Millrace mentioned several good tips. Also, what gauge will this be (distance between the rails)? Size will determine whether or not you can have a fairly accurate wheel system. Try to have an upstop wheel or bar that will catch the underside of the rail to keep your train on course. If it is really small, you can modify model RR wheels (like Millrace and Chris Brewer did) and have the flanges act as guide wheels. Then it's just a matter of banking the track properly so the train doesn't fly off. Rails can be anything from plastic rods to wire, and industrial staples are good for crossties. As millrace said, basswood is best for wooden coasters, and if you want a steel look you can use wooden dowel rods or ABS plastic tubing. Most of these materials glue very easily with CA (a thick super glue) or solder (as in the case of metal to metal). Millrace actually uses solder as the rail!
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Don't.....look.....back! The Headless Horseman awaits you in 2002!
Model coasters and rides
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Sunday, January 20, 2002 2:27 PM
Yup, I'm really happy with the solder.  It doesn't take much force to bend and I can easily make fine adjustments in the track without risk of ripping the structure apart.  N scale model railroad wheels fit nicely on .062" diameter solder.

Of course it isn't nearly as realistic as Arrow Guy's method but mine is so small it isn't that noticeable.  Besides, I wanted to keep my sanity. :)
Check this out for some inspiration:
http://www.inrev.com/rollercoaster

And here's an ambitious project.  Notice that the builder isn't using a base at all!
http://members.fortunecity.com/coasterrob/rtmodel.html

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everything's better with a banjo

*** This post was edited by millrace on 1/20/2002. ***

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Sunday, January 20, 2002 2:53 PM
ok what kind of models are you guys used to making? and also what is the budget around? and then i need to know is the guage (distance between the wheels) the N or HO scales? and how exactly would i put the rails under the crossties for the under wheels? i wish i had supplies to test around!also how can i load a pic? thanks or anything at all

               -ryan

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Formaly Inverted of Danimation

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