Woman falls from roller coaster at Las Vegas Adventuredome

Posted Thursday, March 28, 2019 9:26 PM | Contributed by Vater

A woman has been injured after she fell from a roller coaster at the Adventuredome inside Circus Circus, a Las Vegas casino. The woman was taken to a nearby hospital following the fall. The extent of her injuries are not known at this time.

Read more from Newsweek.

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Friday, April 5, 2019 10:31 AM

Update to story

It sounds like the woman was a double amputee, but was still allowed to ride the ride. After the accident some years ago at Six Flags with the double amputee, I'm surprised any park is willing to allow a double amputee to board an aggressive thrill ride. It's unfortunate, but obviously a serious safety concern.

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Friday, April 5, 2019 11:58 AM

I’m going to go out on a limb (oh god I went there) and say that it has nothing to do with park policy and everything to do with careless or poorly trained employees.

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Friday, April 5, 2019 12:41 PM

Maybe. But I don't think it's known if the rider was missing arms or legs (or a combination of both).

What if the rider was missing both legs but wearing pants? An employee would likely have no way of knowing that, because I don't think it's SOP for any park to randomly ask people if they're amputees. Had the rider not disclosed that kind of information, I find it difficult to assign blame to the park or its ride ops.

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Friday, April 5, 2019 1:16 PM

D_vo said:

Update to story

It sounds like the woman was a double amputee, but was still allowed to ride the ride. After the accident some years ago at Six Flags with the double amputee, I'm surprised any park is willing to allow a double amputee to board an aggressive thrill ride. It's unfortunate, but obviously a serious safety concern.

So was I surprised when Universal allowed a triple amputee to ride Incredible Hulk, which is nothing if not an aggressive thrill ride. He had two prosthetic legs and one prosthetic arm; his only natural limb was his right arm. This was duly noted by me b/c I was sitting next to him and obvious to the ride operators b/c he was wearing shorts and a T-shirt. I very much doubt that he would have been permitted to get on any aggressive thrill ride at a Six Flags park.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 11:15 PM

At some point, there has to be some responsibility by the rider, right? I mean, I guess in most "normal" circumstance, you would trust the operator and park policy to tell you things like whether the restraint is securely locked or whether your body proportions prevent safe riding, but does a double amputee just assume that if they can get on the ride and not get noticed, it must be okay? Like, wouldn't you want to err on the side of caution and on the side of checking everything multiple times with someone beyond a minimum wage summer employee. I have no idea how much this person checked with the operators, but in the article the vet who was refused a ride by SFoG seemed upset by his refusal even knowing about these other ejections.

Last edited by ApolloAndy, Saturday, April 6, 2019 11:22 PM
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