Wind speed at top of TTD

Tuesday, February 4, 2003 2:24 PM
I remember hearing that the winds could reach 40mph at the top of MF and since today the winds near my house hit 40 I thought about the speed on top of TTD. Anyone know of any formula that could be used for something like this? I say they could get up to 60mph or more...
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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 5:00 PM
There is no relationship between wind speeds and height above the ground. It varies. It would even be blustery on the ground and calmer at the top.

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 5:41 PM
hmm...i always thought that the winds are worse as you get higher (to a certain point) in elevation...guess im wrong then

Wouldnt the winds get 'knocked' down by the trees/buildings etc? So that it is calmer then at the top...

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Webmaster Digital-Ignorance.com

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 6:39 PM
It depends on currents, temperatures, what day of the week it is, whatever. It can be gusting at 10 mph at the bottom and only 5 mph at the top. Or 5mph at the bottom and 30 mph at the top. It's random.

Generally it's windier at the top, but there is not a relationship between the two.

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Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 6:49 PM
I always thought it was windier the higher you go. If any of you have been the top of any buildings, sports stadiums, or monuments like the Statue of Liberty, Eiffel Tower, or any other monument you'll be quick to realise how much windier it is at the top then it is at ground level. Plus there are all kinds of currents when you get way up in the air, especially in an environment like CP's. There will definitely be some serious gusts at the top of TTD. That was definitely one of the factors that went into designing that support structure. Which as you can see is completely different than Xcel's as there is relatively no wind in Buena Park.
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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 7:12 PM
Winds are, as a general rule, stronger high up. There is a reason for this: Above houses, trees, walls, ect., there is nothing to block them. Therefore, the conditions might be right for a big gust from zero feet to two thousand feet, but you won't feel it (as much) down on the ground. If you climb higher, to where the wind isn't blocked, you will get a taste of what it "should" be on the ground.

Differences in windspeed at different heights, due to things such as air pressure, are a whole different ball game. They are, as GP has stated, subject to the more stable curents, what day it is, the strength of the sun, the position of the moon (I think), the humidity of the air, and any one of a million different factors. These kinds of things change on not only a day-by-day basis, but on a second-by-second. There could very well be circumstances where the wind was blowing harder (or at least trying to ) on the ground than in the air.

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I hear America screaming...
*** This post was edited by (SF)Great American 2/5/2003 12:12:27 AM ***

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 8:03 PM
It's random. I've walked downtown and been struggling against the gusts only to find that the roof of a moderately tall building was calm.

Generally, yes, butd don't assume so much!

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Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 8:10 PM
GP - Downtown is a whole different ballgame. I live in Chicago and it is basically the exact opposite as to what (SF)Great American and everybody else said. The reason for this is instead of blocking the wind, the tall buildings funnel the wind down the streets.

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 8:15 PM
I know... but it is possible to have wind gusts at a low level and virtually nothing going on even as low as a few hundred feet above it, in downtowns or in the country.

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Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

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Tuesday, February 4, 2003 9:17 PM
General Public said:

It's random. I've walked downtown and been struggling against the gusts only to find that the roof of a moderately tall building was calm.

Generally, yes, butd don't assume so much!


Actually, that's the point I was trying to make. that there was a general rule, but don't assume anything scientific or permanent about it.

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I hear America screaming...

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Wednesday, February 5, 2003 2:38 AM
If anybody really wants to know, you can always check out aviation weather sites to get winds aloft numbers. Granted, the lowest they have is usually in the 3000 foot range, but I'm sure that somebody could make an educated guess for 420 feet.
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Wednesday, February 5, 2003 6:32 AM
I don't know, but the windspeed just before the up ramp will be 120 mph! ;)

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"Know thyself!"

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Wednesday, February 5, 2003 8:36 AM

janfrederick said:
I don't know, but the windspeed just before the up ramp will be 120 mph! ;)

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"Know thyself!"


LOL...i was just going to ask that!

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Webmaster Digital-Ignorance.com
*** This post was edited by Digital-Ignorance 2/5/2003 1:36:58 PM ***

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