Will Koch quoted on USA Today front page

Thursday, October 3, 2002 9:42 AM
All,

I submitted this as news but haven't seen it yet, so here's the post....

Will Koch, the CEO of Holiday World, was recently quoted in an article that ran on the front page of USA Today. The article discusses the impact of Atlas Shrugged, a novel by author/philsopher Ayn Rand. Atlas Shrugged is about of the philosophy of Objectivism, which was invented by Miss Rand. The book is presented as a fictional tale of what would happen if the world's intellectual and business leaders went on strike.

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2002-09-23-rand-1acover_x.htm

Opinion:
I would highly suggest to anyone that this book is required reading. I can honestly say that it affected me profoundly, reinforcing the way I felt about most things and changing the way I felt about other things. I now have an even greater amount of respect for Mr. Koch for his belief in it's concepts.

Later,
EV
-----
"I swear -- by my life and my love of it -- that I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine"
Ayn Rand, Atlas Shrugged, 1957

*** This post was edited by EchoVictor on 10/3/2002. ***

+0
Friday, October 4, 2002 9:22 AM

Will was thrilled to be interviewed for that article. When I emailed the reporter to compliment him on the cover story (and to thank him), he said he'd received a ton of feedback--and that CNN might do a story on it, too.

I'll post something if Will is included in any additional stories on this topic. We think the Markey issue fits right in!

Thanks, Paula

-----------------
Paula Werne
Holiday World PR
JPWerne@holidayworld.com

+0
Friday, October 4, 2002 1:44 PM

I remember breezing past Atlas Shrugged in college, only to regret it later when I merely skimmed it. Last year I made it a point to sit down and actually read the book.

It's definitely a refreshing twist given that most fictional works that make a political statement often do so with a liberal bent.

So you have to go in and realize that the good people in this novel aren't the community do-gooders but the Dagny Taggarts and Reardons -- the business people.

I'm guessing that objectivism might not be in style right now given the executive debacles going on right now in Corporate America but the notion that the rich visionaries rarely get the credit they deserve rather than lampooned (ala Gordon Gecko in Wall Street) makes it an amazing read, no matter which side of the political fence you fall on.

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...