What is cheaper to build? Intamin or Morgan?

Wednesday, August 14, 2002 10:31 AM
I have talking about taking an example of a hyper having the same profile and demensions. Who could build it cheaper? I think Intamin has some great element such as a Stengel Dive but Morgan's trains are more roomy.

-----------------

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 10:46 AM
It takes a lot of flexibility to get into the Intamin Hyper seats, but once you're in, they are very comfortable. The most comfortable and roomy trains are the Giovanola trains cause they were designed originally for 3 across, but later changed. Cheapest, probably morgan. MF cost 25 million, and smaller Intamin designs such as Xcelerator are very expensive per foot of track.

Morgan's will be much more reliable from the start.

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 10:51 AM
I think Intamin would be cheaper. I think SD2K coasted $50 million. The Intamin track adds extra support so there can be less supports which I Would think would be cheaper. But it's just a guess.

-----------------
Six Flags, the only chain of parks that can manage to have stacking with a one train operation.

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 10:55 AM
its not good comparing SD2k to xcelerator though! both coaster were very expensive for several reasons and so doesnt really show the average cost of either companys product
+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:01 AM

Actually, Intamin track has less supports, due to the track design. If you look at Millennium Force's lift and then SD2K's lift, you will notice how MF has very little supports compared to SD2K.

It depends what type of design you have. I believe Intamin would be cheaper.

-----------------
The ice age killed the dinosaurs, we killed ourselves.

*** This post was edited by CobraRoller on 8/14/2002. ***

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:05 AM

Intamin has got to cost less in the hypercoaster category. The first picture I saw of SD2K my first thought was good lord thats a lot of support structure - and support structure is the biggest chunk of change in the tracks themselves. The running rails are relatively inexpensive, but the more supports you have, the more steel is required and the more footers (and soil/rock foundations) are required. Intamin's lack of supports also creates less of a design hassle as far as checking for cracks, wind loads, etc ...

I say Intamin hands down.

-----------------
Steel - #1 Kumba, #2 Millie, #3 Mantis ||| Wood - #1 Thunderbolt, #2 Villain, #3 Gwazi
"The key to a happy life is moderation" -- Jon Stewart

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:06 AM
Steel Dragon 2000 cost $50 million beacause Morgan added more supports than usual because of earthquake building laws in Japan. Look at pictures of the turnaround on SD2K and you can notice extra supports.

-----------------
#1 Steel-Nitro
#1 Wood-Shivering Timbers

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:09 AM
Wasnt SD2K "earthquake proofed"? Wouldn't that explain away the extra supports?

I dont think there are any Intamin and Morgan coasters alike enough to gauge the cost of one to another. *Maybe* you could try Steel Force and S:ROS @ SFDL, but I have no idea of the price for either.

BTW: I'm sure Xcelerator's launch system put a hefty mark up on the price.

EDIT: Beat by the rocker!
-------------
"To get inside this head of mine, would take a monkey-wrench, and a lot of wine" Res How I Do

*** This post was edited by 2Hostyl on 8/14/2002. ***

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 11:18 AM
The Morgan hypers (Wild Thing, Steel Force, Mamba) cost $10 million. S:ROS at SFDL cost $12 million. Draw your own conclusions.

-Nate

*** This post was edited by coasterdude318 on 8/14/2002. ***

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 12:31 PM
I was thinking that Morgan is the cheaper one but it has hard to tell.

-----------------

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 2:27 PM
Where did the $12 million on S:ROS come from? I bet it was more. If not, then that was a bargain! :)

-----------------
-Matt
2001 Magnum Crew

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 3:32 PM

If you're asking which is cheaper for the company to Manufacture, then I'd say Intamin, without a doubt. Their unique box or triangle truss track, as others have said, eliminates probably around 50% of the supports required.

However, what the two companies charge is totally dependant on the profit margins they want to have.

Just with a quick RCDB search, SFDL's S:RoS was $12,000,000 for 5400' of track, that's $2222.22 per foot of track. Meanwhile, Steel Force & Mamba, at $10,000,000 each, both with 5600' of track, that's $1785.15 per foot of track. Valleyfair's Wild Thing, being a bit shorter, but the same cost, was $1831.50 per foot of track.

Millennium Force was $3790.75/foot. Steel Dragon 2000 was a whopping $6270.75/foot. That's nearly double the cost for the Japanese ride, but there were many Earthquake Proofings done, and Japanese laws to follow (you'll notice that every inch of track is accompanied by a walkway, as is the case with most Japanese coasters).

-----------------
So what if the best coaster in Australia is a second hand Arrow?

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 3:35 PM

Remember the price of a coaster is in direct corealation with its height, most of the time.

A 300 foot coaster with 5000 feet of track will cost more then a 200 foot coaster with 6000 feet of track.

-----------------
All I need is 4.5 million bucks and a half a mile long sliver of land and maybe someone could build me my very own Shivering Timbers.

*** This post was edited by MagnumForce on 8/14/2002. ***

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 6:39 PM

Ready for the plot to get thicker?

VF didn't pay $10 million for WT.

If you read carefully, VF's $10 million cap expansion budget featured WT, but also included a RipCord and employee dorms among other things.

Also keep in mind that the costs of building a coaster or major attraction also include land clearing and other costs. If you have to demolish or relocate other structures, the costs go up. If you're digging tunnels or adding scenery (lagoons?), the costs go up. If you're building on swamp (Jazzland) the costs go way, way up.

-'Playa

-----------------
The CPlaya 100--6 days, 9 parks, 47 coasters, 2037 miles and a winner.....LoCoSuMo.

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 7:25 PM

Are those numbers for the earlier Morgans like Wild Thing adjusted for inflation? If not, the Morgans could in fact be more expensive.

The Steel Phantom - Phantom's Revenge revamp was said to cost $7 million, between demolition and construction. Using auscoasterman's price-per-foot metric, that's about $2200/track-foot, right in line with S:ROS. Now, that's not exactly a fair comparison, since PR reused some pieces (station, lift, first drop), but required some extensive demolition work. According to Kennywood, an all-new ride would have cost them more, but that "cost more" could very well have included the costs to fully demolish PR.

So what does that prove? That there are MANY factors that go into the total reported price of a coaster. If we could get our hands on JUST the manufacturer's cut, that'd be a fairer comparison.

-----------------
--Greg
"Now all I want is to find a way home, to warn Earth -- look upward, and share the wonders I see..."
My page

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 8:36 PM

RllrCstrDude187 said:
I think Intamin would be cheaper. I think SD2K coasted $50 million. The Intamin track adds extra support so there can be less supports which I Would think would be cheaper. But it's just a guess.

-----------------
Six Flags, the only chain of parks that can manage to have stacking with a one train operation.



Most of the cost of SD2K is in the earthquake proof structure. I don't know what would have Intamin would have charged for SD2K but I would be thinking it would have cost more to build from them. I am imagining a MF (Which cost $25 mil to build) coaster with 4 times as much supports would cost over $50 million.

-----------------
Chris Knight
Whoa I'm the 88984594th Vistor to Coasterbuzz. I wonder what I have won.

+0
Wednesday, August 14, 2002 8:43 PM

I dont think Millie would require that many more supports though.

-----------------
All I need is 4.5 million bucks and a half a mile long sliver of land and maybe someone could build me my very own Shivering Timbers. ;)

+0
Thursday, August 15, 2002 1:47 AM

Intamin is more expensive!!! Yeah, less support, but do you think that box track is cookie cutter? It's all unique, from foot to foot (minus straight sections). I read along time ago (like in the 80's) in some coaster publication (probably ACE or WNYCC) where one of the designers or builders of the 1978 Mindbender and Shockwave coasters had "very expensive track design." Less supports, but track is harder to build than supports. Whoever it was that said that track is expensive, also said it has more "flexibility" than normal steel track.

Plus they gotta ship 'em over here (if the coaster is to be built in the US..)

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...