what is B&M's official website?

Wednesday, April 18, 2001 4:17 PM
I know this is a stupid question but what is B&M's official website?
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Wednesday, April 18, 2001 4:24 PM
As far as I know, they don't have one. There are some very good unofficial ones like www.bolliger-mabillard.com.

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E.J.
Webmaster: Theme Park New England
http://tpne.8m.com
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Wednesday, April 18, 2001 4:25 PM
I am not aware of a B&M official website.

-Jeff

http://americacoasters.com
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Wednesday, April 18, 2001 5:50 PM
There is none. B&M have enough of a reputation that their customers know where to contact them. Thus, they do not need a website.
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Wednesday, April 18, 2001 10:23 PM
V2 Fiend says:

There is none. B&M have enough of a reputation that their customers know where to contact them. Thus, they do not need a website.

While I do agree with your statement, B&M should have a website. All major companies have a website so being known shouldnt keep them from creating one.

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"SAVING THE WORLD BEFORE BEDTIME" Powerpuff girls
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Wednesday, April 18, 2001 11:21 PM
I disagree with the thought that they "should" have one. Why do they need one? They design rollercoasters...that is a pretty narrow product line. And look who buys their product... amusement parks, not Joe Smith down the street. A website is just an added expense that many companies in similar situations are finally realizing they don't need.

But it would be cool if they had one.
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 2:39 AM
Why do they need one? It lets Joe Shmoe learn more about the company. It's exposure, any way you cut it, and exposure is good, even if your customers already know you. The fact is, maintaining a company website for a company like B&M is not expensive in the least. It's $35 for the year to register the domain name, about $30 a month for site hosting, and might cost them $10,000 for the creation of the site, plus about $500 a month for maintenance. For a company like B&M, that's nothing. They wouldn't need to update it very often...could probably nix that $500 monthly cost then.

Jman
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 4:33 AM
They have an e-mail adress, which is kept sort of secret, cause they dont want every enthusiast mailing them continuously. That adress is known to industry people only.
Some of the fan sites include all coasters B&M have ever built.
I think it adds to their "myths", not having a "ordinary" website ;) *** This post was edited by tricktrack on 4/19/2001. ***
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 5:33 AM
I don't agree they need a site. Not exactly, anyway. A site could be a good use for exchanging documents and such via password protected areas (kind of a customer relationship management tool), but they don't need a site to "sell" anything. The industry is too closed-circuit to bother, especially those who can afford a B&M.

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Jeff
Webmaster/Admin - CoasterBuzz.com
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 5:59 AM
The rollercoaster designers with websites generally are the ones looking for business, not having the business come to them (as is B&M's case). Many of those companies also sell smaller, more modest items like flat rides which are within the budget of a wider audience. B&M seem to only sell $10+ million dollar rollercoasters. They apparently get all the business they can handle through word of mouth and conventions like IAAPA.
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 6:00 AM

V² Fiend said:
"There is none. B&M have enough of a reputation that their customers know where to contact them. Thus, they do not need a website."


So does Arrow but they have a site. Its good for information about the company

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You are the Weakest Link, Goodbye.
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 6:11 AM
An argument can be made that "newer" companies like RCCA, setpoint, S&S, GCI and CCI could use websites as their names aren't *quite* as known in the industry (though especially in the case of CCI their products MORE than speak for themselves). However, it's awfully odd that Arrow, Morgan and Intamin have sites and B&M doesn't. These companies have been around as long as B&M if not longer so they also are "known" in the industry. It leads me to believe that the sites are not just for those "in the industry".

That being said, I agree that there is no *need* for an official B&M site. Just about everything you could want to know about them is already on the web anyway. The only thing that is really missing is that whole incestuous Intamin/B&M/Giovanola relationship...
lata,
jeremy
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 7:35 AM
Having a website makes coaster riders aware of the projects a company has completed. Feedback from riders can lead to a parks decision. Also, listing of what coasters they have created can send riders to certain parks, benefitting the park that purchased the ride and leading to another purchase.....so it is beneficial to have a site for the general public.
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 1:08 PM
Companies like Arrow, Morgan, and Intamin sell a wide variety of attractions like carousels and antique cars. They have a wide enough product lineup that a website listing their catalog could be beneficial to customers. B&M only makes huge megamillion steel coasters and when they come out with a new design, like their flying coaster, all the parks will quickly hear about it.
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 2:26 PM
B&M does have a beautiful print brochure, though. :)

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Jeff
Webmaster/Admin - CoasterBuzz.com
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Thursday, April 19, 2001 9:45 PM

Jeff said:
"B&M does have a beautiful print brochure, though. :)"


Cool! Is there a site where I can view it, print it out & laminate it to hang on my bedroom wall? :)

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Australia's No.1 Coaster Nut
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