Walt Disney World will implement just-announced Apple Pay in time for holidays

Posted Tuesday, September 9, 2014 10:15 PM | Contributed by Jeff

Apple's new Apple Pay -- a system that allows purchases via the new upsized iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus -- will work at Walt Disney World right off the bat when it launches in October. Apple Pay also will work with the upcoming Apple Watch that was introduced Tuesday afternoon.

Read more from The Orlando Sentinel.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:01 PM

TouchID works perfectly? It took people less than two days to beat it. If it was combined with a PIN it would make a lot more sense. Tokenized card numbers only make sense in closed systems. So for example, Target's token for your card can only be used in Target's system. But for a generally tokenized network the only win is that you can't use it on systems not on the network.

I'm pretty sure Jenny Lawrence is not interested in using it. :)

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Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:51 PM

"less than 2 days to beat it." - you might want to go look that one up. If your definition of "beat" includes spending hours to recreate a fingerprint w/ tools of a crime scene technician then ok, it was "beat." It has never been hacked, if it had I highly doubt financial institutions would be trusting it.

The whole point of TouchID is convenience, instead of tapping in a pin millions of users can now just hit the home button and instantly be verified / let into their device. Unless you're the President or an elite spy I doubt you need to worry about your fingerprint being recreated w/ sophisticated techniques just so they can get into your smartphone or make a credit card charge. W/ ios8 it can now be used to let you into any application too... it's really hugely useful to never have to type usernames or passwords for anything.

Last edited by RollrCoastrCrazy, Wednesday, September 10, 2014 3:52 PM
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Wednesday, September 10, 2014 6:34 PM

Yeah it was hardly beat in any meaningful way.

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Saturday, September 13, 2014 6:43 PM

The liability of fraud changes in October 2015. If you're not using an EMV enable system as a vendor (cards with the chips in them) then you are more liable for fraud use.

NFC use qualifies as well as EMV chips. It's the norm in most of the world but not here in the US. With Apple jumping onto this the way they did, you have a LOT of vendors who were already planning on updating their systems in the next 12 months.

Now they have another advantage if they upgrade to a system that is NFC and ApplePay compatible.

And never underestimate Apple's constant pointing out that they have half a billion credit cards online which can instantly be linked to this system. As a vendor, you'd have to take that into consideration as to what system you're going to go with.

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Saturday, September 13, 2014 7:02 PM

To be clear, "Apple Pay" is mostly based on a system devised by Visa in the first place, with MC and AmEx coming along from the ride. The only thing you can really credit Apple with is the desire to bring it mainstream. And looking at the iSheep waking up at 3 am to order something they can probably buy in a week at their convenience implies that they have a shot.

The EMV standard... it's pretty weird that it's not already in play here in the US, but we're difficult like that. As much as it will be a pain in the ass for everyone needing to upgrade their POS hardware, it's long overdue.

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Saturday, September 13, 2014 11:19 PM

Just an FYI but "iSheep" is just as annoying as "Micro$oft".

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 12:32 AM

That's OK, you don't have to use it.

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:09 PM

Ha Tekwardo... you've been successful in showing Jeff's immaturity on his very own site!

There's nothing like an Android fan throwing a fit on an internet forum.

It's not our fault that Apple created a successful payment platform while Google failed for several years. It's reality. Tough stuff.

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:16 PM

This "oh... but someone else did it first!" line of scoffing has time and time again been proven to be ridiculous.

Apple didn't make the first mp3 player... they made the first commercially successful and modern one with the iPod.

Apple didn't make the first smartphone... they made the first commercially successful and modern one w/ the iPhone. (Palm and Blackberry were the predecessors... lol)

Apple didn't make the first tablet... they made the first successful tablet. Windows tablets were literally a joke and still are.

Apple didn't make the first "smart" watch... but you better damn well believe that they'll be the first major player in the market when you compare sales #'s of the 6 models that Samsung released in the past year vs. the Apple Watch.

Scoff all you want... there is a reason Disney is implementing Apple Pay on a public, wide scale while they never made a press release saying "Google Wallet will be in our parks soon!" That should be obvious to anyone.

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:17 PM

Sorry, what was that? I've been struggling with Apple Maps again...

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:20 PM

This thread is about Apple Pay and it's entrance into the very large Disney economy... an economy that competitors never had a shot in. .15% of every transaction from this new system on Disney properties now goes to Apple.

Apple Maps, a failure their CEO has admitted publicly numerous times, has nothing to do w/ that. Keep it on topic.

Last edited by RollrCoastrCrazy, Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:21 PM
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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:24 PM

Jeff said:

To be clear, "Apple Pay" is mostly based on a system devised by Visa in the first place, with MC and AmEx coming along from the ride.

Sources?

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:34 PM

RollrCoastrCrazy said:

There's nothing like an Android fan throwing a fit on an internet forum.

Oh, sweet irony.

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:41 PM

RollrCoastrCrazy said:

Scoff all you want... there is a reason Disney is implementing Apple Pay on a public, wide scale while they never made a press release saying "Google Wallet will be in our parks soon!" That should be obvious to anyone.

Google Wallet is compatible with MasterCard's PayPass. Therefore, there is no reason to promote GW if you already had PayPass-compatible readers. Technically, Wallet presumably uses PayPass no less since it uses virtual MasterCards for your transaction. If putting in new readers, then sure, it might be neat to mention Wallet. I use my Nexus 5 at PayPass readers all the time...

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Sunday, September 14, 2014 11:56 PM

RollrCoastrCrazy said:

Keep it on topic.

Well. I've been schooled. Never mind. If you'll excuse me, I have several failed Apple products to deal with....*

*Somewhat joking. I much prefer Macs and iPads to Windows and Surface. Just saying, Apple has a great track record....but not a perfect track record.

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Monday, September 15, 2014 12:47 AM

I love Apple but I don't see a lot of people being interested in Apple Watch. You already need an iPhone to use the Apple Watch, and your iPhone already does almost everything the Apple Watch does, and more. I just don't think it will be as appealing as Apple thinks it will be.

I'm probably wrong. I just wanted a new updated iPod. :(

As for Apple Pay, fantastic idea. My only concern is hacking. Wasn't iCloud hacked recently in the celebrity photo leak?

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Monday, September 15, 2014 12:55 AM

What LK said.

It seems that hardly a day goes by without a company announcing they've been breached.

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Monday, September 15, 2014 8:28 AM

RollrCoastrCrazy said:

Ha Tekwardo... you've been successful in showing Jeff's immaturity on his very own site!

There's nothing like an Android fan throwing a fit on an internet forum.

Calling me immature is a really great way to end your membership here. I have never owned an Android device, ever, outside of work (unless you count a Kindle Fire, which is technically a fork). Furthermore, understanding payment systems is a part of what I do for a living, recently a theme park company, no less. So if you'd kindly put your junk back in your pants, no one is interested in seeing it. If you want to exchange resumes, I'm pretty sure I'll have more experience with this stuff than you.

Travis: In a lot of ways, there's less to worry about with "hacking" in this case than in traditional card transactions. When you buy something on Amazon, for example, your card number is stored in an isolated system, where it is given a "token," which is just some other series of characters that represents your card. The rest of Amazon, the less secure parts, stores this token. When you see your cards on file, they don't show you the number, of course, but that's also because that database doesn't have the number, it only has the token (which often has the last four digits in it). You can see why that's an advantage... the token is mostly useless. If there was a breach of that "outer" system with your account data, it wouldn't matter because the token is useless outside of Amazon's system. When it comes time to charge you for something, the system tells that isolated system, "Hey, can you charge the card with this token associated with it?"

The mobile standards work on the same principle, but only on a network wide basis. You add a card to your virtual "wallet," and when you do so, your card number is sent to a central repository, and you get a token back. When you tap your phone on an NFC reader, you transmit the token to it, and then the merchant's network calls the central repository and says, "Hey, I need you to charge the card associated with this token." That system is a little more complicated because the calling system has to let it know where to send the money. Apple Pay, Google Wallet on Android and whatever they call it on Windows Phone all work this way.

The last part of the security involves a hash that you need to unlock the transmission of the token. On the iPhone it's the fingerprint, and on Android and WP, it's a PIN. Neither one is stronger than the other. If I recall, getting that hash involves the SIM card in the phone. The bottom line is that the token is useless outside of the payment network, and it's a lot harder to get than the 16 digits on your plastic card.

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