unofficial "hands up" policy

Saturday, September 20, 2003 4:31 PM
I just wanted to pass along to everyone a little something we can do to be safer and speed the loading process. Whenever I board a train and the ride-op comes by I always put my hands up so that he/she can check my restraints with a clear view. It may seem silly to some but I believe that in some small way it helps.

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We don't need no stinking badgers!

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Saturday, September 20, 2003 4:37 PM
I do that as well, and as a previous ride operator, I can tell you it helps quite a bit. I remember working Magnum on Coaster Mania....Easiest time ever loading and unloading those trains......Alot of times, Ride operators do battle withs somones arms or hands, it does cost them time.
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Saturday, September 20, 2003 6:32 PM
I've been doing that for a while now, but seem to be the only person on a train who does. Not only does it make the op's job easier, but if you're like me and you don't like people even accidentally nudging your hands because you have spacial problems, it helps more. I know, I'm crazy.
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Saturday, September 20, 2003 7:02 PM
While I don't go as far as to put my hands up to look like a goof-ball, I do pull my arms up against my chest to make it easier for the ops.

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I lied.

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Saturday, September 20, 2003 8:21 PM
I always put my arms up, I'll do what ever it takes to keep the line moving and help the loaders out.

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http://coastertrackrecord.tripod.com/

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Saturday, September 20, 2003 9:43 PM
It may save the op time but not make the line move faster on most coasters due to that fact they cant relese them until the other trains pass a certain point, on single train coasters like CLP's BS maybe but like MF for example, its usually the fat people who don't fit that slow the process down.
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Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:21 AM
That's not exactly where I thought this conversation would go. Considering current events, i'm saying that if ride-ops do what they gotta' do with a clear view it would cut down on safety issues.

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We don't need no stinking badgers!

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Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:40 AM
I went to Martins Fantasy Island last year and rode my first and only CCI, Silver Comet. I rode it 27 times. I was always by myself, and always in the last row. I had the lapbar next to me lowered and the seatbelt around it. The ride op sort of got the picture I knew what I was doing so after the 8th ride or so he just passed by my row.

But yea it DOES help. I think it also helps if there are handles, like an Intamin hyper/giga/rocket, would be easy to check.

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http://sfdlmania.thrillnetwork.net

Six Flags Darien Lake Mania! Your #1 source for DL and other parks!

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Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:07 PM
I also pull the tail-end of the seatbelt out from between my legs or out from under the lapbar, whatever and make sure it is within reach of the ops. Better then have them digging around in the seat to make sure it's secure.
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Ripple Rock Amusement Park
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Sunday, September 21, 2003 6:28 PM
I also put my hands up and do like Ride of Steel when I'm a single rider. I will also undo the belt and raise the lap bar in the empty seat after the ride is complete. Those few seconds saved when we all help out a little add up throughout the day.

I don't see how it will improve the safety Mark, the ride op is either going to do his job correctly or, he is not. Even doing a good job checking the belts and bars still does not prevent some idiot from acting unsafe and doing stupid things on rides.

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2003 Parks: Cedar Point, SFWOA, Kennywood, PKI, MIA, SFGAM, SFKK and HW.
Still deciding where to go in 2004.
*** This post was edited by CP ismyhome 9/21/2003 10:36:15 PM ***

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Sunday, September 21, 2003 8:08 PM
When I first read the title for this post, i thought it was going to be a topic about how it takes so long to launch the Top Thrill Dragster because people won't put their hands down. And then the message keeps saying "Hands down" Well I think that is hilarous and, being too lazy to make a whole new thread about it, am talking about it on this thread. Hope nobody minds.

Oh and with the hand thing, you don't have to stick em up like you're getting arrested. All you have to do is lift your hands off the bar like 6 inches so the op can get all bar and no skin. Most of the ops just touch the bar and move on anyway. All in all it's no biggie, they can get around you just fine.

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Riding on top of the world with Cedar Point

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Monday, September 22, 2003 5:14 AM
I usually retract my arms in such a way as to give a clear view of the lap bar and the seat belt or what ever other restraints might be there. Usually this is simply pulling my forearms up to my chest.

A lot of the time I am a "single rider". on PTC coasters with belts, I watch how the ops secure the belt in the empty seat (simply buckled on the seat or "buckled over the bar"). On a re-ride, after securing myself, I usually reach over and buckle the belt on the empty seat in the manner that the ops do. Most will check it out, see that it is okay, say "Thank you", and move on.

When exiting, I will usually undo the belt next to me and pull up the restraint as I pass.

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Half of the people surveyed agree, half disagree and another half are unsure.

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Monday, September 22, 2003 7:55 AM
At enthusiast events, you will often see almost the entire train doing this. It does noticably speed thing up when everyone does it.
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Monday, September 22, 2003 11:49 AM
SLFAKE, when in doubt on an empty seat with a seat belt, you usually can't go wrong wrapping it around the disused lap bar, no matter what the operators do.

Me, I'll do whatever I can to make things easier. I'll generally drape the seat belt over the back of the seat or otherwise put it where the next rider can find it; I'll close bars and belts on empty seats; heck, I'll even do things like extricate people from Intamin seat belts and give double-bars that all-important "push forward" from time to time. At Cedar Point a couple of weeks ago, Coasterville Dave was asking me when I was going to put in my application... :)

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
Who has never worked at any park...

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Monday, September 22, 2003 12:01 PM
I always make sure my hands and arms are clear of the restraint. I have never thought of capacity or making the op's life easier, I just consider it common courtesy/sense really as they obviously need to get to the bar to check it.

If it's simple, I always flick the seatbelt off an overhead restraint if one is vacant meaning it pops up when they're released. If the ride operator misses this when sweeping the train, it can cause hold ups/confusion when the restraints are re-locked.

And if someone on my row doesn't know how to release the seatbelt (happens a lot), it doesn't take long to quickly flick the buckle as I walk past to unfasten their seatbelt.

One thing I never do is push down a restraint on a vacant seat. This I think is mainly due to different policies at different parks - often a single rider could fill that spot, and it would actually hold up operations in this respect.

Speaking of helping operators, I find that the faster the crew, the public seem to inherit this sense of urgency and speed up too. I know when they do capacity races at Thorpe Park and have extra staff working extra fast to get the trains out (Colossus Vs Inferno, Loggers Leap Vs Tidal Wave etc), guests seem to really get into it quickly dumping bags and clearing the train quickly.

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Comprehensive European ride and coaster reviews
http://www.ukrollercoasters.co.uk

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Monday, September 22, 2003 12:43 PM
I always have my hands in the air before the train leaves the station -- but that's just because I'm a dork :)

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--Maddie--
What do I Listen-To?
May the Schwarz be with you.

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Monday, September 22, 2003 12:53 PM
Marcus Sheen said: One thing I never do is push down a restraint on a vacant seat.

I guess I should clearify. I do close the restraint on an empty seat next to me on a 2 seater (but not on a B&M for some unknown reason) only AFTER I see the air gates close, knowing that (normally) no more riders will be loading. If there are no air gates as at some parks, I usually let the ops take care of it for that very reason... never know when another single rider will pop in.

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Half of the people surveyed agree, half disagree and another half are unsure.

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Monday, September 22, 2003 1:09 PM
I have always put my hands up when they come by to check the restraints, and like Marcus Sheen I never thought about it helping capacity. I just do it so its easy for the op to check the restraint.

I also will close and buckle a empty seatbelt next to me if I need too, after the air gates have closed. That I always did to help get us out of the station quicker :).

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Good day....I said Good day!
Dave
http://www.SFGAmWorld.com

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Monday, September 22, 2003 1:17 PM
Personally I think parks should adopt the Europa Park method for checking restraints on rides/Coasters and that is, dont Bother Checking the restraints ;)

Basiclly, when you get in the car, and pull the bar down, the ride op will give you a quick glance to see if its down(That goes for everyone else as well) and when they are happy, they give the thumbs up and you're outta there in seconds. Even if your bar is not down, they will indicate to you to push it down or help you with it, So quick and such a good policy to speed things up.

To show how quick it is on rides, I went on the bobsled and when I got seated and started to push down my lapbar, I was starting to go out the station with my lapbar about half down down, It was mad.

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Monday, September 22, 2003 1:42 PM
I do that too, just so that I can ride out of the station quickly enough. I don't push on the restraint next to me when I know there is no one going to come on, I guess I should do that next time.
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Family Guy: "Oh no, Oh no, Oh no, Oh yeah"
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