Top Thrill Dragster

Friday, May 16, 2003 3:30 PM
I heard this from someone in front of Top Thrill Dragster is there a sign saying that if there is to much weight on the car it might not make it? if so how much is to much and how would that work?
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Friday, May 16, 2003 3:37 PM
Thats wrong, the more weight, technically the faster it would go, but also, the faster it would slow. I believe that it's an equalateral on TTD and that it wouldn't have a set rollback weight.

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Shaun Rajewski
CoasterLine
http://www.coasterline.com

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Friday, May 16, 2003 3:38 PM
ok thanks
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Friday, May 16, 2003 3:42 PM
That's wrong. If you add more weight to the train, the interia will increase, but not the speed. Particularly if the energy accelerating the train remains constant, which is probably the case.

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Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

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Friday, May 16, 2003 3:53 PM
I dont recall any sign that says anything about weight, it does say there is a chance it wouldnt make it over, but that could be caused by a huge gust of wind or the launcher not launching at full speed.Also, it specifically says the ride will not fit larger riders, so weight should not be a problem.

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AHHHHHHHH!

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Friday, May 16, 2003 4:10 PM
I know this isn't what you guys were talking about, but I judt didn't feel like starting a new post. But I know TTD goes 120 but I finally watched the onride video at cedarpoint.com and it didn't look that fast at all and it didn't look like 420 ft either. I was just wondering from those who have rode the ride, does it actually feel like your doing 120 mph and that you go up 400 feet in the air. And how about the drop? Is it intense or just like any other drop? I'm still going to ride it, I just wanted to know.
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Friday, May 16, 2003 4:15 PM
romeo it is unlike anything youve ever been on- it definitely feels like 120, and if you just watch it in person, it looks like 120 too. the view from the top is magnificent and the spiral at the end is insane, definitely the best ride ive ever been on.

the video does it no justice

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AHHHHHHHH!

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Friday, May 16, 2003 4:33 PM
The train is weighed before launch by sensors or something to change the actual launch speed.

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The Emergency Stop

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Friday, May 16, 2003 5:52 PM

General Public said:
That's wrong. If you add more weight to the train, the interia will increase, but not the speed. Particularly if the energy accelerating the train remains constant, which is probably the case.

No, you're wrong. Kinetic energy is 1/2mv^2. Same energy with higher mass means lower speed.

My understanding is that the train will accelerate to the same speed regardless of weight, and since friction will have a greater affect on a lighter train, a lighter train will have a harder time making over the hill.

For those of you playing at home (or not old enough to have kinematics yet), in a frictionless environment, equal speed -> equal height, regardless of weight.

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Be polite and ignore the idiots. - rollergator
"It's not a Toomer" - Arnold Schwartzenkoph

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Friday, May 16, 2003 5:57 PM
That's what I meant. If you launch an 8 ton train and a 10 ton train with the same force, the 8 ton train is going to travel higher, because the world doesn't operate in a frictionless environment.

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Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

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Friday, May 16, 2003 7:06 PM
If you add more weight to the train, the interia will increase, but not the speed. Particularly if the energy accelerating the train remains constant, which is probably the case. Also kinetic energy is 1/2mv^2. Same energy with higher mass means lower speed.
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Friday, May 16, 2003 7:09 PM
I have a friend who's sister went to CP and rode TTD. Supposedly the ride broke down and as they were testing it to re-open the ride stalled on the way to the top and fell back down 3 or 4 times. No one was on but the train it came up short several times. I know it may sound like an unreliable source, but I know this girl and I believe the story because she saw it with her own eyes. I'm going in early June and I just hope some of the bugs will be worked out.
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Friday, May 16, 2003 8:56 PM
I don't know why everyone is making such a big deal about rollbacks. They are a common occurance, especially in the mornings when everything is cold and the hydro fluid hasn't thinned out or when there are high winds. I saw atleast a dozen rollbacks on my trip to CP last weekend which was basically Saturday night and most of Sunday.

They are more anoying than anything else, because they have to keep resetting the ride everytime there is a rollback during the testing. Except the first ride the public got on Sunday (which was at about 11:45) it rolled back, but it didn't have to reset, they just braught it back to the launch area and launched it again. And yes, there is a sign right before you pick which station you are going to wait for that says a train will occasionally not make it over the hill, and that you shouldn't be alarmed anytime this happens. Although it doesn't say anyting about wind or weight.

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"This time I think ... I think it's ... it's going to work!" - Dr.Bruce Banner

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Friday, May 16, 2003 9:00 PM

steelraptor said:
If you add more weight to the train, the interia will increase, but not the speed. Particularly if the energy accelerating the train remains constant, which is probably the case. Also kinetic energy is 1/2mv^2. Same energy with higher mass means lower speed.

Not only did you rip off me and General Public, but you did it incorrectly. The entire point I was trying to make was that what you ripped off from GP was incorrect. Are you trying to make yourself seem smarter somehow? For crying out loud man, get a life.

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Be polite and ignore the idiots. - rollergator
"It's not a Toomer" - Arnold Schwartzenkoph

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Friday, May 16, 2003 9:03 PM

General Public said:
That's what I meant. If you launch an 8 ton train and a 10 ton train with the same force, the 8 ton train is going to travel higher, because the world doesn't operate in a frictionless environment.

Um...I think we both know what we mean, but your use of physics terminology is incorrect. Since F=ma, if you launch an 8 ton train with the same *force* as a 10 ton train, the 10 ton train will accelerate slower. Thus, it will have a slower max velocity and will travel less high up the tower.

I know you know what you're saying, but if you're going to throw terms around like energy and force, you really ought to know what they mean.

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Be polite and ignore the idiots. - rollergator
"It's not a Toomer" - Arnold Schwartzenkoph
*** This post was edited by ApolloAndy 5/17/2003 2:40:31 AM ***

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