Thrust Air 2K Rollback device?

Monday, January 29, 2001 12:49 PM
I haven't heard anything about them and I looked everywhere. If they are going to have 4 trains going, the have to have some sort of device to stop the train from rolling back into the station.
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Monday, January 29, 2001 12:57 PM
Either that or since the launch is so quick they will wait until the car clears the apex to bring another into the station. Or the launch itself will be able to stop the car if it comes back down.

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#1 Steel-Incredible Hulk
#1 Wood--Timber Wolf
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Monday, January 29, 2001 12:59 PM
My theory: one loading block, one unloading block , one ready to launch block, one circuit block, one open brake/transfer block before unload station.

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Scott W. Short
scott@midwestcoastercentral.com
http://www.midwestcoastercentral.com *** This post was edited by ShiveringTim on 1/29/2001. ***
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Monday, January 29, 2001 4:54 PM
Do you think all season radial tires need installed during rainy days? Firestone? Winter treads and/or chains for the Christmas season? Just a thought.
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Monday, January 29, 2001 6:19 PM
Snow tires with studs (yeah I know thery're illegal most places now).
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Monday, January 29, 2001 6:22 PM
Better not use Firestones or Bridgestones BABY!!!!!!!!!
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Monday, January 29, 2001 6:36 PM
Since we're on the topic of Thrust Airs... What happens if the train would get stuck at the top of the hill. If the train balances just so.

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Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it...eventually
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Monday, January 29, 2001 7:00 PM
Well, RandyHutchinson,

Everyone would count to three and rock back & forth in synch. Pretty soon, the coaster would rock and eventually tip to either side of the lift hill and come down!
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Monday, January 29, 2001 7:07 PM
Dawg Byte,

LOL, yeah I spose that'd work. But without anti-rollbacks it could be messy in the station.

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Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it...eventually
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Monday, January 29, 2001 7:14 PM
I think it would work like it does in RCT with the dive machine type coaster. You launch the next train, it bumps into the one stuck, the stuck one dives down the hill and a new train is stuck. Then you repeat the process until you find out something is wrong. Stop operating the coaster and click on the construction icon. I am sorry, I forgot we were not playing a game. OOPS *** This post was edited by lumpy72 on 1/30/2001. ***
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Monday, January 29, 2001 8:47 PM
That would be one hell of a BUMP! If I am counting 1-2-3, I hope we all go forward. What happens if a hubcap blows off? How many injuries?
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Monday, January 29, 2001 8:53 PM
Yeah, You do that you're talking lawsuit city. Escpecially with a launched coaster.

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Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it...eventually
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 5:21 AM
Well, unless Stan Checketts and PKD manangement are complete buffoons, they will be using 'aircraft rated' tires (widely available from Michelin and BF/Goodrich) and as you know, those types of tires are capable of operating in all manners of weather.

Also, I would suppose that they would have some antirollbacks on the up side of the tower. And if somehow people got stuck..out comes the cherry picker.
lata,
jeremy
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 5:37 AM
My guess is that there will be brakes running down the length of the launch, which of course are open during launch. As soon as a train clears the launch the brakes close. If the train fails to crest tower, these brakes will stop the train prevent a collision in the station. The next train can't advance to the launch until the previous one crests the tower. I believe this is how most complete circuit launch rides do it.

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Scott W. Short
scott@midwestcoastercentral.com
http://www.midwestcoastercentral.com
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 7:03 AM
Makes sense. Thanks for clearing some confusion Scott

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Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it...eventually
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 7:31 AM
Where is the launch on TA2K, anyway? Is the launch on the hill, or on the flat track leading up to the hill? If it's on the flat track, then I'd say Scott is probably exactly right...if the car fails to make the hill, it rolls back down the hill and into a series of brakes at the downtrack end of the launch.

Seems to me Volcano does much the same thing...

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
                                 |\  ***  HARD HAT AREA  *** 
|__ | \ .sig under construction
========= ____________|+|!&\ | \==# ##&\
========= OO =OO==O (oooo) (oooo)-(
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 7:36 AM
Man, I'd hate to be someone who gets 'cherry picked' from this ride. Imagine trying to get out of this one if you're flat on you back (with a possible OTSR in your way) to try and get into a 5x5 basket of sorts. {shiver} I was wondering how they'd go about getting people off of a TA2K if Stan gets his wish to build a 100mph/300footer? That would be very interesting to see....
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 8:33 AM
From the video I've seen, it's exactly like the other two launch rides at PKD: long launch runway leading to some sort of element.

Something interesting mentioned during the PKD presentation at No Coaster. As with all other S&S products, the trains will be weighed before each launch. Barring any mechanical failure in either the launch system or train, there should never be a rollback. Hopefully S&S had the foresight to install "rollback" brakes on the launch.

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Scott W. Short
scott@midwestcoastercentral.com
http://www.midwestcoastercentral.com
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 1:08 PM
Weighing the trains does make sense...

With a conventional coaster, the mass doesn't matter because the force provided by gravity to propel the train varies proportionally with mass at a ratio of about 32 pounds per slug. The practical upshot of all this is that regardless of the train's mass, its top speed will be the same.

With a launched ride, you're not using gravity to provide the force, but you still need to have enough energy to overcome gravitational force (which, again, amounts to 32 pounds per slug) if you plan to make it over the first hill. Since the force of gravity varies with mass, the amount of energy you need to climb the tower will be different for every train. Consider a 100' tower...To coast to the top you need an initial velocity of about 80 feet/second. If the train mass is 187.5 slugs (weighs 6,000 pounds) empty, you'll need an initial force of about 480,000 pounds to get it moving fast enough to go over the top. Fill that full of riders, and the train mass goes up to about 468.75 slugs (weighs 15,000 pounds), which means now your launch has to be 1,200,000 pounds.

But if you launch the empty 6,000-pound train at 1.2 million pounds, you'll end up shooting it off at 200 feet/second (136 mph). So you can see there's a certain advantage to knowing the vehicle mass when you fire it off with a launch. And furthermore, you can see why the cars on Superman: The Escape at SFMM don't always go the same distance up the tower!

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
                                 |\  ***  HARD HAT AREA  *** 
|__ | \ .sig under construction
========= ____________|+|!&\ | \==# ##&\
========= OO =OO==O (oooo) (oooo)-(

*** This post was edited by RideMan on 1/30/2001. ***
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Tuesday, January 30, 2001 2:16 PM
I kind of figured that a traditional rollback device wouldn't work (unless you really want to use those cherry pickers) and they would need some sort of breaking system.

If they don't install any kind of rollback, I will NEVER ride this thing. To many things can go wrong for it not to make it over the apex. Lets say the train is in mid launch and the power fails for the launching system. One of those firestone tires explode on the way up (OK, that's exaggerating). On a similar note, a part breaks which slows down the train. Wind resistance will never be constant, and up that high the winds will be strong. Weather conditions in General, such as moisture on the track, humidity, and air temperature will all play a big factor on how fast this thing makes it over the top. Of course I am not an S &S engineer, and these are just theories of mine.

The biggest mistake is for them just to say "aww. it will never roll back, its got enough power". I am sure Intamin, a company supposedly 2 years ahead of the curve said the same thing before Millennium Force rolled back on the 3rd hill.

The "rollback brakes" I think would present a difficult task to engineer, but I don't have enough time right now to type in my ideas about them. Anybody got ideas on how these would work?
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