testing time, how long from "completion" to RIDING

Sunday, February 17, 2002 8:12 AM
I know all coasters require testing with computers, dummies, etc., before riders are permitted.  Good for safety!  However, I'm noticing how fast these coasters are being assembled this year, and I'm wondering if we can expect B:DK, S:UF, WT, and the rest to be up and running by opening day for their respective parks.  I know we have some knowledgeable folks around who can enlighten the rest of us as to what is really involved in all the "testing" when it comes to a new coaster...
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Florida needs an Intamin and/or CCI soon...PLEASE!
Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
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Sunday, February 17, 2002 8:31 AM
Rideman can give you a better answer than I can on how long testing typically takes.  A lot depends on how complex a coaster is and how many unexpected problems come up.  My guess would be 2-4 weeks for a smooth simple startup.  Then there are coasters that still aren't operating to design that opened last spring.

In terms of opening on time, the real issue isn't how long it takes to test.  It's how long it takes to test compared to the time allowed in the schedule for testing.  If it takes 8 weeks to test a coaster and you allowed 8 weeks in the schedule, you will open on time.  If it takes 6 weeks to test a coaster and you allowed 2 weeks you will open 4 weeks late.  Of course there is always to issue of if testing started on schedule.

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Sunday, February 17, 2002 8:33 AM
Imagine this: Every single proxie, motor, chain, switch, computer system must be checked, double checked and triple checked before a car can even go around the course by its's self. Basically anything that has power flowing through it, or operates using another motor or device, must be checked and tested.
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Jes
Jes's Roller Coasters DJ Jes MCS
"Thank You Jeff Putz"
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Sunday, February 17, 2002 10:33 AM
i think it varies.

for example, a new type of ride or restriant, like a new flying roller coaster will take longer to test than a new sit down coaster as they have to make sure it is all safe.

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Sunday, February 17, 2002 11:23 AM
FYI, Rideman is going to be away from the Internet this week, so don't be offended if you don't see him jump in there on questions like this. ;)

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Jeff - Webmaster/Admin - CoasterBuzz.com, Sillynonsense.com
"As far as I can tell it doesn't matter who you are. If you can believe, there's something worth fighting for..." - Garbage, "Parade"

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Sunday, February 17, 2002 11:32 AM
It varies a lot of the time. Look at Phantom's Revenge, the construction seemed like it took forever, but not too far into it's first testing day, people were already riding it. Some are faster than others. It all depends on how fast the construction crew works.
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Sunday, February 17, 2002 11:48 AM
In the case of S:UF, the track may be done, but there is still A LOT of work to be done on the station, queue, and the surrounding theming.  If the track itself is ready for riding on opening day, you'll probably be flying over construction-like mud puddles, etc.

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"A gun is not a weapon...it's a tool...like a butcher knife, a harpoon, or an alligator"

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Sunday, February 17, 2002 11:54 AM
Sure, but PR was hardly a new coaster from a testing standpoint, was it? I mean they didn't need to check the station, brakes, trains or restraints much more than a normal day of operation, did they?
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Sunday, February 17, 2002 1:43 PM
...Jeff you (kinda) answered my question better than anyone...but I appreciate the responses.  Thanks, LOL!
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Florida needs an Intamin and/or CCI soon...PLEASE!
Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
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Sunday, February 17, 2002 2:12 PM
I think here in the UK there's a minimum of 500 test runs included in the Health & Safety Examinors' standards.
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