Teen paralyzed after jumping coaster fence sues operator

Posted Saturday, June 20, 2015 9:24 AM | Contributed by Jeff

A teen seriously hurt at the Red River Exhibition in Winnipeg two years ago is suing the Ex and North American Midway Entertainment. Adam Martens, who is now 18, was hit by the undercarriage of a car on the Crazy Mouse roller coaster when he walked through a gap in a fence to get his baseball cap, which blew off during the ride, according to court documents filed Tuesday in Winnipeg.

Read more from The CBC.

Saturday, June 20, 2015 9:28 AM

That's his own damn fault for going in a restricted area. I don't think he really has a good case.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 10:10 AM

Another case I wish could be heard by America's preeminent jurist....

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 1:01 PM

Ren says "You eediot!"

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 1:16 PM

Time to play dodge coaster!!!

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 2:05 PM

The policy that lost items are collected
At the end of the day is there for safety purposes! Jeez.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 2:29 PM

I understand that his life and those of his family have been changed, permanently, by this. But when he chose to jump over that fence, well... all that follows stems from the choice he made to ignore that barrier.

Maybe it's my ASD, but I just can't muster much sympathy.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:02 PM

I feel bad for the kid no matter who's fault is really is. After reading the story, it is inconclusive that there was a gap in the fence or not. If there was an opening, I'm not going to be so dismissive of the park's innocence here.

He said that he should have been warned to remove his cap before the ride. He also says that when he returned, no one wanted to retrieve his hat, so he decided to do it himself.

If he was actually told that he would have to wait until the ride closed, but didn't want to wait, then he is more at fault. If he wasn't told to wait, and he did not understand that ride attendants would retrieve the hat later, I can see why he thought his only option was to get the hat himself, especially if there was an easy way for him to get into the ride area.

Not everyone knows enough to not enter a restricted area when a ride is in operation. The park may be partially at fault here. Did they have signs warning people to not enter the area? Was there an open gate or gap? Did the ride attendants fail to inform him of the loose article policy, both before and after the hat was lost?

Did he fail to heed the warnings from both signs and the ride attendants?

But then there is this...

He said the policy that all items lost during the rides can only be retrieved at the end of the day needs to be changed.

It sounds like he knew the policy.

And then there is this...

I feed him. I get his meds. He has to be [catheterized], washed up," said Meeches. "[Before the crash] Adam was active. He was on his trampoline or on his four-wheeler – hockey. He was a daredevil.

He was a daredevil. A daredevil to me is someone who takes chances and laughs in the face of danger; someone who would climb a gate to retrieve a hat even after he was told not to. He took a chance, and lost. Perhaps it is not the park's fault at all.

Last edited by LostKause, Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:02 PM
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Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:25 PM

LostKause said:

After reading the story, it is inconclusive that there was a gap in the fence or not. If there was an opening, I'm not going to be so dismissive of the park's innocence here.

He said that he should have been warned to remove his cap before the ride. He also says that when he returned, no one wanted to retrieve his hat, so he decided to do it himself.

If he was actually told that he would have to wait until the ride closed, but didn't want to wait, then he is more at fault. If he wasn't told to wait, and he did not understand that ride attendants would retrieve the hat later, I can see why he thought his only option was to get the hat himself, especially if there was an easy way for him to get into the ride area.

Not everyone knows enough to not enter a restricted area when a ride is in operation. The park may be partially at fault here. Did they have signs warning people to not enter the area? Was there an open gate or gap? Did the ride attendants fail to inform him of the loose article policy, both before and after the hat was lost?

The fact that this block of text exists, probably legitimately needs to be considered and was posted not in jest is a perfect example of exactly what's wrong with the world today.

Shouldn't "don't step into the path of high speed heavy machinery" be common sense 101?

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 3:53 PM

I have trouble with the notion that "not everyone knows enough" to not enter a restricted area. It's not rocket science.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 6:07 PM

The fault clearing lies with the kid not the ride operator. Any reasonable person would know not to enter a fenced area where the ride is still in operation. Yes this kid is an idiot.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 7:30 PM

Maybe any reasonable person would know better. I don't know though. Do I only know better to not go into a coaster low zone because I am a coaster enthusiast? I don't know if people understand that rides are dangerous or not. Also, I've read many times that teenagers lack the understanding of personal danger. Gates get locked for good reason, to keep the stupid people from accidentally killing themselves.

I think this kid is an idiot as well, but a lot of teenagers are idiots. He actually said that the policy that lost articles would be retrieved at the end of the day needs to be changed. That's his argument? Yes, he's an idiot.

My question is, did the park do everything that they could to idiot-proof their ride? That is unclear in the article.

Last edited by LostKause, Saturday, June 20, 2015 7:31 PM
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Saturday, June 20, 2015 7:45 PM

That's the wrong argument. I don't think it's anyone's responsibility to teach people not to play in traffic. It's the same thing.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 8:58 PM

All I can say is he's paralyzed now over some hat. That's the damn thing. A hat.

Dear Everyone:

If your hat blows off and goes over a cliff, off a bridge, out on the freeway, in an auger, or under a roller coaster, let it go. Call me and I will get you a new hat.

Your friend,
Mac.

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Saturday, June 20, 2015 11:56 PM

LostKause said:

Do I only know better to not go into a coaster low zone because I am a coaster enthusiast?

I'd like to think you know better than to jump over a fence to get to that low zone, regardless of whether you're a coaster enthusiast ... or a teenager, a Cat Fancy subscriber, a corporate CEO or the FedEx guy.

He may have been "left with the impression" that the refusal of trained ride operators to retrieve the hat he didn't secure while the ride was in operation meant he was at liberty to retrieve the hat at his leisure... but that's his poor decision, and no fault of the expo.

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Sunday, June 21, 2015 12:13 AM

Isn't it pretty much universal common sense that the point of fence or wall around something is to keep people or animals out?

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Sunday, June 21, 2015 12:16 AM

But, but... he lost his hat and the ride ops wouldn't risk their own lives to retrieve it! What else was he supposed to do?

I know I sound horribly unsympathetic... but he made a series of very poor decisions. None of the businesses involved should have to bear the brunt of his bad decisions.

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Sunday, June 21, 2015 12:47 AM

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Sunday, June 21, 2015 12:49 AM

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Sunday, June 21, 2015 1:04 AM

Yeah. I suppose I have coaster enthusiast blinders mucking up my perception of the story.

I do feel bad for the kid. It's like that time my neighbor's dog got killed when he was struck by a railroad car. It was sad, but I thought the dog was pretty stupid for chasing the train.

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