Steel Eel..Hypercoaster?

Thursday, December 7, 2000 4:51 PM
Since I did not want to debate in a great topic thread. I decided to start a new thread to ask peoples opinion. What do you think are the qualifications for a hyper coaster and do you think that The Steel Eel qualifies?

I personally think >200ft on a continuous circuit roller coaster qualifies it as a Hyper. And even if it has a 200ft drop I will consider it to be a hyper. Steel Eel to me does not qualify, however I will admit that it is designed like a hyper in many ways. I am not sure why they did not make it taller but I would have to guess either height restriction or lack of money.

-------------
#1 Steel-Incredible Hulk
#1 Wood--Timber Wolf
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 5:31 PM
Heh, I was going to start the same thread! :)

As you can guess, I am of the opinion that Steel Eel is a hypercoaster. I say this because it mimicks the hills of a classic wooden coaster. I don't think there is any definite height requirement for a steel non-looping coaster to be termed a hypercoaster. To me, it *looks* like a hypercoaster, therefore I consider it one. Just like Superman The Escape *looks* like a coaster to me. Granted, I wouldn't count something reletively short (ie 100' - 125') like Gemini a hyper. In the end, I guess it's a ride by ride basis in which I would label a coaster a hypercoaster or not.

-------------
SFGAm '01: Better than Wildfire
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 5:42 PM

I'd support the ride by ride theory, simply we because were about to be invaded by coasters that are over 200ft, but don't follow the hypercoaster format. The Arrow 4d is rumored to be at least 200ft tall, and you know there are floorless coasters on the way that hit or exceed 200ft. Are we prepared to call those hypers?
-------------
Take a picture, it will last longer...
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 5:45 PM
When I hear "hypercoaster," I basically think of a non-looping steel coaster. But, other people just think 200+ feet qualifies it.

However, there's debate over whether or not Steel Phantom was a hypercoaster. It had a drop of over 200 feet, yes, but it had (famous) inversions. What is it?

What about Son of Beast? It's got a 200+ foot drop, but it's wooden (not to mention it contains an inversion). What is it?

This is the first time I've heard of a coaster with a 150' drop being called a "hypercoaster". Sure, if it's only 150' tall with a drop of over 200', I'd call it a hypercoaster. (Steel Phantom's 167', for your information.)

But wait! There's still more!

Cedar Point's Magnum, typically called the "world's first hypercoaster", only has a drop of (get this)... 194'8"! Is it a hypercoaster? Well, as I mentioned, the general consensus is yes... but this does pose an interesting question, doesn't it?

Hypercoasters: Based on height? Based on drop? Both?

Reply carefully...

-------------
How dare you vanquish the Steel Phantom without his consent? Fear the Phantom's Revenge.
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 6:04 PM
But Lynch! Its Sinking! It was higher then 200' but it Sunk! ;)

-------------
Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 6:22 PM
How about calling the Steel Eel a pseudo-hyper?


-------------

Coasters...the best natural buzz available.
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 7:21 PM
200ft+ coasters with inversions should be called Mega Coasters. I do not consider Manhattan Express to be a Hypercoaster even though it rises to 203ft.

-------------
Coasters - Man's finest creation or is it God's?
Brought to you by Australia's No. 1 Coaster Fan.
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 7:29 PM
That's true, Randy. So, what is it? An ex-hypercoaster? The controversy rages on! ;)

CoasterGod: I think B&M calls their non-looping steel coasters over 200' "mega coasters," such as Raging Bull. I don't know if Apollo's Chariot (170' tall, 210' drop) is considered a mega coaster or not. I think it is. Still, that term could cause confusion.

-------------
How dare you vanquish the Steel Phantom without his consent? Fear the Phantom's Revenge.
*** This post was edited by Lynch on 12/8/2000. ***
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 7:40 PM
B&M calls Raging Bull and Apollos Chariot speed coasters. I dont think they like the term hyper coaster and I dont blame them. Hyper was just a gimmick used by Arrow when it debuted Magnum. Speed makes much more sense because that is what it is based on.

-------------
"DONT FIGHT IT, RIDE IT",,,,RAGING BULL
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 7:50 PM
Steel Eel is a "diet hypercoaster"
Not as many calories as your normal hypercoaster

Actually I think it's referred to as a Junior Hypercoaster.


------------------WILDFIRE--------------------
What they're renaming Ragin' Bull to Milk Cow?
----------------------------------------------
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 8:09 PM
I thought Raging Bull was billed as a 'hyper-twister' by SFGAm when it opened.


+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 8:09 PM
What's the point of the debate? 'Hyper Coaster' was just a phrase coined by, I belive, Cedar Point to sell Magnum as something different. We enthusiasts just adopted it to cover any coaster that has a lift or a drop greater than 200', and now less than 300'. Not getting deep into the 'Giga' thing either. For an explanation, see above.

-------------
Everybody calm down, the coasters do not open for another fifteen minutes.
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 8:11 PM
Couple of things. B&M refer to their "large, non-looping" coasters as Megacoasters, not hypercoasters or speedcoasters. Speedcoaster was a term invented by SFGAm with the debut of Raging Bull. On the boxes for Raging Bull it never said speedcoaster, it always said "B&M Megacoaster." Just to clear up any confusion...

Secondly, "hypercoaster" was coined by Allen Ambrosini, an editor (?) for At The Park magazine. It wasn't, to my knowledge, created by Arrow.

Yes, you're correct Matt, Apollo is considered a Megacoaster to B&M, just like Nitro is.

Hope this clears up any confusion!

Joe, who thinks a hypercoaster is any large, steel, non-looping coaster created to mimick the hills of a classic wooden coaster (read: airtime).

-------------
SFGAm '01: Better than Wildfire
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 8:34 PM
Legendary, are you sure about that? I am not doubting you. I was told that they termed RB and AC as speedcoasters. I remember you saying that you were a ride op on RB so I guess you would know the term but I thought megacoaster was one that related to say Shockwave but in essence I guess it isnt much different besides the inversions.

-------------
"DONT FIGHT IT, RIDE IT",,,,RAGING BULL
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 8:37 PM
I agree Legendary. That's my definition.

-------------
Take a picture, it will last longer...
+0
Thursday, December 7, 2000 9:16 PM
Yep, I'm sure it's a mega. I thought the same as you until someone told me to check out the press release again. SFGAm always said speedcoaster, but BGW never did. Then I looked at my pictures of B&M crates containg bolts, nuts, etc and it said "B&M Megacoaster." Then, to top it all off, the picture of Nitro's same type of crates said "B&M Megacoaster." So add all that together and I think the park was the one who said "Speedcoaster" and the manufacturer calls it "Megacoaster." Also, Intamin and I *believe* Giovanola use the same terminology for their hypers, which is Mega.

-------------
SFGAm: Twice the fun in 2001 (hint, hint)!
+0
Friday, December 8, 2000 6:29 AM
Hypercoaster, Megacoaster, Speed, Mega Twister...

It's all good ;)



--------------WILDFIRE---------------
A "Legendary" Experience in the woods
--------------------------------------
+0
Friday, December 8, 2000 9:51 AM
I say a hyper coaster is a coaster with a drop or structure height at or exceeding 200', however, the drop must be of reasonable size relative to the structure, i.e. Manhattan Express isn't a hyper. Also, this would apply to wooden coasters, looping coasters, but not shuttle coasters. For the hyper coaster that feature inversions, the sub-category "hyper-looper" is used, but it can still be referred to as a hyper coaster.
+0
Friday, December 8, 2000 1:45 PM
Well I think the best name for Steel Eel is a "junior-hyper" and that is what the industry refers to it as also.
+0
Friday, December 8, 2000 2:02 PM
God How many times are we going to go through this.

Arrow, who built Magnum, made the term Hyper Coaster. IT IS A COASTER OVER 200 FT. You cannot say that the coaster has to have a DROP of 200ft because the original Hypercoaster, Magnum, doesn't have one. The Term "Hyper" is made up by Arrow, whether other companies want to use the term is up to them.

-------------
Number 1 And Only Cedar Point
+0

Closed topic.

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...