Saturday, April 14, 2001 6:30 PM
What is train stacking? On a roller coaster.
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Saturday, April 14, 2001 6:42 PM
Train stacking is when a train is being loaded (or emptied) in a station, and another train comes and stops on the end-of-ride brake run, just sitting there. This is a problem with slower crews (or shorter coasters) and people just sit waiting for the first to go out again.

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Loopscrew.com
It's coming...
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Saturday, April 14, 2001 8:31 PM
Loco,

Its like what happens on the Ripsaw everyday at Camp Snoopy

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Randy Hutchinson
You build it, I'll ride it...eventually
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Saturday, April 14, 2001 8:35 PM
For a perfect example, visit BGT and ride Gwazi, Kumba, or Montu when they are running at full capacity. They stack every time. (Especially Gwazi with the 5 minute loading process.)
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Saturday, April 14, 2001 11:17 PM
Actualy for the best lesson in train stacking, go to six flags ohio.
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Monday, April 16, 2001 9:11 PM
Some parks simply don't monitor thier crews enough or in the case of Gwazi need to formulate a more sensible plan for loading and unloading. Coasters are not designed to stack in operation. Stacking should only happen when you have no choice (i.e. disabled person, etc.). Rides are designed with plenty of time to unload, load, and dispatch a train/vehicle. For example Disneyland is very good at sending trains out at a good constant rate. SFMM on the other hand isn't. After working at two theme parks, I can say the goal to prevent this is to give people a little "push" or a feeeling of urgency for them to sit down and pull down on thier restraint so we can get this thing outta here so we can keep the line moving and prevent andy breakdowns. When you have ops who don't care because they are lazy or simply not "pushed" by management stacking will continue to happen
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Monday, April 16, 2001 9:14 PM
To continue where I left off it makes me so mad to see slow crews for no particular reason. I know at the park i work at now, we get chewed out and even written up for stacking, because it makes no sense (this is from the standpoint that its the crews not the guest casue sometimes guests can be soooooooooooo slow!)
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Monday, April 16, 2001 10:01 PM

hothitz said:
"Actualy for the best lesson in train stacking, go to six flags ohio."


Yes, that is very true. Still, I think they solved that problem by moving to the one train operations, which angers me more.

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Tuesday, April 17, 2001 5:37 AM
I wouldn't say that all coasters are designed not to stack...

Magnum XL-200 will always stack one of three trains in normal operation because B (gravity) is longer than C (transfer table). Top Gun at PKI will always stack because there are only three blocks on the ride and two trains, so the second train has to be on the block brake before the first can dispatch, and the first has to be a trainlength or two up the lift before the second can enter the station.

Some rides, on the other hand, should never stack. Gemini for instance is designed to never stack even with six trains running. It's all in the block timing.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
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Tuesday, April 17, 2001 6:57 AM
...then there's Mantis :)

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Scott W. Short
scott@midwestcoastercentral.com
http://www.midwestcoastercentral.com
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Tuesday, April 17, 2001 8:02 AM
Well I never thought about those rides. Also, Canyon Blaster has 3 blocks with two trains. The second train can be sent if the first has cleared the second vertical loop. This way the train will enter the station by the time the other is going over the top of the lift. If the ready brakes still have a train on them or for some reason the train hasn't reached them yet, then the lift will stop causing a block violation or setup.
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