Spinning Rides

Friday, March 25, 2005 7:41 AM
I've been noticing that all my life I've been able to ride and enjoy spinning rides like tea cups or rides like penguin blizzard river at sfa but this summer they made me feel dizzy and nautious. I can't really figure out why. does anyone know why this happens or has had this experience?
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Friday, March 25, 2005 8:54 AM
I loved spinny rides like the tea cups and stuff when I was younger, I could go on them repeatedly and nothing bad would happen. Now I go on one, and I get dizzy and my system shuts down, I feel like I can't get on another ride for a little while until I recuperate. I love coasters, and am fine with them, but have issues with other spinny rides. The only one in recent memory that I was ok on was The Claw at Hershey....had no problems with that.
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Friday, March 25, 2005 8:59 AM
I don't have that problem. Dizziness comes from some liquid in youhr choceala (sp?) spinning around inside there. If the liquid is still then you will be fine. I don't have that problem. I just am afraid of heights. I ride roller coasters but I get so scared but I think that that feleling is so cool.
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Friday, March 25, 2005 9:03 AM
As you get older, you tolerance will weaken for certain things. Perhaps you may find yourself getting dizzy quicker on flats or you might find that one day you just can't ride coasters or go for a ride in a car without having motion sickness.

Thats what Dramamine (sp) is for

Im 31, and Im noticing that I can't do as much stuff as I used to when it comes to high-intensity rides or I don't enjoy somethings that I did when I was younger or that I get headaches more frequently now.

I used to be able to ride Gravatron's over and over and now I just may ride it once and move on... or skip it all together.

I guess you can also say that rides i enjoyed as a kid were okay for me then since I haden't experienced much, but now with so many newer, better rides under my belt, I just prefer to skip the ones that appear medicore to me.

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Friday, March 25, 2005 9:52 AM
I never could ride any ride that spins in a tight circle without getting sick.

But now that I'm 29, I get sick a lot easier than I used to. I certainly couldn't ride Face/Off six times in a row without getting up like I did at its media day in 1999. I rode one of the B:TRs last year four times in a row and nearly had to talk to Ralph on the big white phone.

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Friday, March 25, 2005 10:29 AM
I am 33 and don't have a problem with the spinning rides. However, I have noticed that I don't have the tolerance that I used to for standing in long lines.
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Friday, March 25, 2005 10:59 AM
We've been thru this before, and actually (medically-speaking, LOL), it's that the tiny hairs INSIDE the inner ear become more brittle with age. When you're young those hairs are extremely flexible and allow you to *self-correct* for off-balance situations such as spinning. As those hairs become brittle, it takes longer for your inner ear to *restabilize*...hence, your sense of balance isn't as resistant as it might have been when you were younger.

bill, NEVER really enjoyed teacups, rotors, Tilt-A-Whirls, Gravitrons, Paratroopers, etc. For some reason the SWING on an Afterburner or Chance Revolution makes me WAY more tolerant of all the spinning...

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Friday, March 25, 2005 11:09 AM
I didn't start riding anything (coasters or flats) until I was 27 (I'm now 30), so I really don't have anything to compare my current tolerance for spinning to. I'm really not a big fan of rides that spin you very quickly anyway but will ride them occasionally and whoever is with me always seems to want to spin like a maniac. My favorite of them are the Tornado's that not only spins but then has the spinning gondolas as well. It takes me a minute to recover after that one.
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Friday, March 25, 2005 11:50 AM
Wow I didn't know any of the health stuff. I like rides like top spins and but maybe just spinning rides that spin and don't swing (I'm ok with the claw). The teacup gets me and even little spinning rides make me a bit nausious. But I can always recover quickly or for a coaster of course.

Also Penguin Blizzard River at SFA especially. I liked it the first time I rode it but after that I just couldn't do it. I went there again and everyone that I was with went on in while I ate one of those snobiz's. It used to be the other way around-I would ride anything.

And I still will for the most part :-). *** Edited 3/25/2005 4:50:42 PM UTC by Austin***

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Friday, March 25, 2005 12:26 PM
You silly kids! lol I'm over 40 and still love spinning rides and getting dizzy! Went on the teacups with my kids last year and spun so fast that we kept spinning for minutes after the ride stopped! I was never real good with rides that spin in too many directions at once like a Spider, but teacups, tilt-a-whirl and other spinny ones are great! hmmm, guess its an individual thing :)
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Friday, March 25, 2005 4:52 PM
I won't do scramblers,teacups,rotors,tilt a whirls or round ups but I'll ride most other flats & a few types of water rides.
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Friday, March 25, 2005 5:13 PM
Try this next time you want to try a spinning ride but are too afraid you'll get sick. Instead of keeping your head fixed, find something to look at off the ride and keep watching it until you cannot turn your neck any farther, then find something else to look at and repeat. This is essentially the technique that figure skaters use when they are spinning on the ice and I've found it works great on certain rides, especially scramblers and round ups. I've found I can once again ride and enjoy those rides if I follow that technique. Teacups I'm fine with, as long as I at least have a little control over the spinning. It's still been a while since I've been on a tilt-a-whirl though.

Just remember, motion sickness is attributed to one of two things: 1) what you see is not matching up with what you're feeling, that's why some people cannot read in the car, because they don't see what's outside the window, just the book while feeling the motion of the moving car, or 2) feeling the same repetitive motion over and over, like the rocking of a boat, or the constant similar movement of the "spin-n-puke" genre of flat rides. That's why you usually don't get sick on rollercoasters or non "spin-n-puke" thrill rides, like Top Spins, or Bumper Cars, or the like...

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Saturday, March 26, 2005 11:30 AM
I used to live for the spinning rides too.

I am hoping I can handle Insanity- the ride, in Vegas. I think that it would be so cool to be flying 906 ft above the strip. It does 40 mph and 20 revolutions per minute (capacity of 400 riders per hour). I want to see how others handle it before I get on it.

http://www.insanityride.com/

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Saturday, March 26, 2005 11:40 AM

Coaster Lover said:
Try this next time you want to try a spinning ride but are too afraid you'll get sick. Instead of keeping your head fixed, find something to look at off the ride and keep watching it until you cannot turn your neck any farther, then find something else to look at and repeat.

I've tried this method, actually...and it doesn't work for me. I've tried closing my eyes, I've tried staring right at the wheel/bar in the car, I've tried buring my head in my girlfriend's shoulder, none of it works, I still get dizzy. Oh well...

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Saturday, March 26, 2005 1:13 PM

Coaster Lover said:
Try this next time you want to try a spinning ride but are too afraid you'll get sick. Instead of keeping your head fixed, find something to look at off the ride and keep watching it until you cannot turn your neck any farther, then find something else to look at and repeat. This is essentially the technique that figure skaters use when they are spinning on the ice and I've found it works great on certain rides, especially scramblers and round ups. I've found I can once again ride and enjoy those rides if I follow that technique. Teacups I'm fine with, as long as I at least have a little control over the spinning. It's still been a while since I've been on a tilt-a-whirl though.


I was a figure skater and my sister is a very competitive figure skater. DO NOT DO THAT AT ALL! WARNING IT WILL MAKE YOU LOSE YOUR BALANCE! YOU WILL FALL AND WILL HAVE A VERY SERIOUS INJURY. I was very competitive and that is the biggest don't I have ever heard. KEep your head still so that you are focused. During spinning and jumps you don't focus on anything except position of your body. My sister tried just being stupid and went to the hospital with the blade going into her leg. I did that and went to the hospital with a minor concusion. DO NOT DO THAT! NEVER SAY WHAT SKATERS DO UNLESS YOU SKATE! OBVIOUSLY YOU DON"T SKATE BUT IF YOU DO THEN YOUR COACH ISN"T GOOD AT ALL. Here is a fact this is a FACT

Skating causes more injuries than any other sport. It is a very dangerous sport. What made me quit was the concusion. That was a very close call. *** Edited 3/26/2005 6:15:34 PM UTC by cofan101*** *** Edited 3/26/2005 6:16:52 PM UTC by cofan101***

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Saturday, March 26, 2005 2:30 PM
It's just figure skating. Come on....
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Saturday, March 26, 2005 3:19 PM
Do you figure skate? If you don't then shut up. It is the hardest and most bodily injuring sport in the world. I did it am I'm a guy. Trust me. I did it as a sport.
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Saturday, March 26, 2005 3:28 PM
There is nothing to be achieved by turning your head and following an object; in fact, this method might actually worsen the problem because of the rapid head motions involved. The key to avoiding excess motion sickness is to keep your eyes trained on an object or line off of the ride that most closely follows your path of motion. Remember, motion sickness comes when your body is unable to match the "visual clues" it receives from the eyes with the actual motion that it is experiencing. If you're on a spinning flat ride and start to get sick, try to look at something that also follows the circular motion--for example, if you start feeling ill on an Enterprise attraction, focus on a circular path or fence that surrounds the ride. Trust me, this works wonders! If you pick something that completely surrounds the ride, you should not have to turn your head at all. In fact, I believe that this is the method that figure skaters use; I remember watching a documentary that mentions how skaters follow the path of seats or dividers around the arena during spins.
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Saturday, March 26, 2005 3:46 PM
They don't. You all don't skate so you all don't know! I skate I know. You don't follow seats or dividers. You spin to fast. You have to use your balance to spin and jump. That's it. That is the first thing you learn is balance on the ice. Then you start with swizzles. Then you go to spins and relying on your balance and body position.
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Saturday, March 26, 2005 3:53 PM
I still loved to be spinned, but sometimes my 33-year old body takes longer to get over the temporary dizziness associated with most of them. I still have never become nauseous though.

The more spinning the better! Especially on the Reverchon mouseys and Tilt-A-Whirls. :-P

-Tina

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