Some Orlando residents considered permanent tourists

Posted Monday, September 30, 2013 9:14 AM | Contributed by Jeff

Orlando is a city with dual, and dueling, identities. It's the place of 2.1 million residents and 51 million tourists. It is both a city of permanence and transience, of resident and visitor. The permanent tourist chooses to live close to the attractions. The permanent tourist goes to the theme parks at least once a week for food, entertainment and relaxation. The permanent tourist's social and family lives revolve around the Magic Kingdom, Epcot Center, Islands of Adventure, Shark Encounter.

Read more from The Orlando Sentinel.

Monday, September 30, 2013 9:17 AM

Wow, this is me. I have to admit that I haven't figured out what a vacation looks like since I'm so used to coming here. I know we'll visit CP next summer, and I'm sure we'll end up in the Northwest again. Hawaii is a priority too.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 12:44 PM

Heck, we do that with our measly SFoT. It's not quite as glamorous, but I've definitely spend a fall Saturday afternoon just walking the park for no reason.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 2:03 PM

I know it's just semantics, but if you live next to the place you're visiting, technically you're not a 'tourist'. I think the more correct term would be aficionado.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 2:17 PM

Yeah, I buy a pass for Dorney every year, stop by for a lap or two on Talon once or twice a week, and I leave again. However, I'd never call myself a permanent tourist of Allentown. Ew. *laugh*

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Monday, September 30, 2013 3:41 PM

Yeah, I mean, I do that with all of Charlotte's touristy places. Save the White Water Center, but I'm determined to get a pass for next year.

Heck, week before last, I drove to Carowinds for an hour. Last week, I went for 2 hours during SCarowinds for some nite rides, and went again this friday.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 3:52 PM

I did the same thing living in Cleveland, with regard to Cedar Point, but it's definitely something different in Orlando. These are attractions that people come from all over the world to see, and the passes just ain't cheap. And it's not just one park, it's a bunch of parks, water parks, entertainment and retail districts.

But to the point of the article, there are a lot of bigger issues around urban planning and politics. It's all fascinating because unless the military would have decided to grow operations here decades ago, I doubt anyone would be coming here. It's such a huge part of the area's economy, and it creates a strange problem with regard to infrastructure and public assistance.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 6:42 PM

One or two more visits per year and I might be considered a permanent tourist...

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Monday, September 30, 2013 9:29 PM

Perhaps the implied suggestion was that if you live near an attraction or attractions, you're not supposed to go visit them on a regular basis?

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Monday, September 30, 2013 9:40 PM

^In that case I'm not buying any more passes to local parks...

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Monday, September 30, 2013 11:37 PM

51 million? I find that dubious. Maybe if it was spread over a year.

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Monday, September 30, 2013 11:38 PM

Of course it's spread over a year.

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Tuesday, October 1, 2013 7:04 PM

So Jeff, is Orlando all that it is cracked up to be?

Occasionally I have the desire to pack up with my wife and re-locate to Central Florida for the land of fairy tales and pixie dust where the sun shines bright year round and everything is just perfect. Shorts in January and nightly dinners in Epcot.

Would love to hear your perspective on your recent experience moving to Florida…

Last edited by Hanging n' Banging, Tuesday, October 1, 2013 7:06 PM
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Tuesday, October 1, 2013 10:49 PM

Jeff said:

Of course it's spread over a year.

2 million residents were mentioned and in the same sentence 51 million was implied as the population of tourists.

Last edited by bjames, Tuesday, October 1, 2013 10:49 PM
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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 12:14 AM

Are you serious or just being nitpicky for something to do? I can't imagine anyone would think there are 51 million tourists there every day of the year.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 12:47 AM

Yes. 1/6th of the entire US population is in Orlando.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 8:48 AM

I'm sure that some days it must feel like it.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 9:05 AM

Hanging n' Banging said:

So Jeff, is Orlando all that it is cracked up to be?

I suppose it just depends on what you're looking for. We were "done" with Cleveland for a lot of reasons (not the least of which is winter), and we wanted to go to a place that didn't have snow, we could afford to buy a house, and preferably had an amusement/theme park in the area.

Last night, we had delicious food at the Food & Wine Festival, saw the Go-Go's, and enjoyed a nice walk in 80 degrees and a cool breeze. Where else can you do that with almost zero planning? It's not a bad way to spend time after work.

Certainly there are trade-offs. Orlando isn't as "good" as Seattle in a lot of ways. It lacks the beauty and crisp air of the mountains, the technology scene and the culture. It's just different. But for now, you better believe it's working for us.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 9:30 AM

Orlando certainly seems like a nice place to live with short drives to either coast and access to some of the best theme parks in the world.

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Wednesday, October 2, 2013 12:59 PM

Lord Gonchar said:

Yes. 1/6th of the entire US population is in Orlando.

If you come during "Bowl season" between Christmas and New Years....that's not THAT much of an unbelievable figure. The black-out dates are there for a reason...the parks are all FULL.

If you're a resident and go to any FL parks that week, you are either a masochist or a pickpocket.

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