Some complain that Legoland Florida is too expensive

Posted Saturday, October 22, 2011 10:35 AM | Contributed by Jeff

During its first week of existence, Legoland Florida has gathered mostly positive, and in many cases rapturous, reviews from guests and industry experts. But an undercurrent of grumbling has emerged that can be summed up in two words: too expensive.

Read more from The Ledger.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:52 AM

I just read a book (Blink) that told of a triangle taste test where people stated what brand of soda they liked best, Pepsi or Coke. Then two glasses of one brand were poured and a glass of the other was poured. After sipping from each glass, the test-taker could not tell for sure which the third glass was. In fact, most got it wrong.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 12:58 AM

Yeah, that's been done with light beers, too. Most people who prefer Miller/Coors/Bud Light beers can't tell the difference if they're not labeled.

The non-light beers have a more distinct flavor profile, but the corn-water that is a light lager is pretty much indistinguishable to most.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 1:37 AM

Sounds kinda like riding a B&M with your eyes closed - who would be able to tell which one you were on.

"The Claude Challenge!"

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 2:12 AM

a_hoffman50 said:
I just read a book (Blink) that told of a triangle taste test where people stated what brand of soda they liked best, Pepsi or Coke. Then two glasses of one brand were poured and a glass of the other was poured. After sipping from each glass, the test-taker could not tell for sure which the third glass was. In fact, most got it wrong.

Hehe, I recommended that book YEARS ago.

Also highly recomend The Tipping Point. Just started reading Outliers - I'll let ya know, but I'm impressed already. :)

Gladwell gets inside my head in much the same way as Levitt and Dubner.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:29 AM

I always thought the marketing cycle worked the other way around:

People react to certain things so marketers have to adjust their plans to meet the way people react. Marketing plans don't manipulate people into thinking one way or the other, the way people think manipulate the way marketing plans are developed.

If marketing plans were truly manipulative, they'd get me to buy something for $5.45 from the bottom shelf.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 9:16 AM

RatherGoodBear said:
What do you do when you go to establishments (or parks) that don't carry Pepsi?

I know it wasn't asked of me, but... I drink Pepsi. If they don't serve Pepsi, I'll get water or beer or iced tea or something. I just don't like the taste of most Coke products across the board.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:19 PM

I remember an episode of "This American Life" where they found what appeared to be an outdated formula for Coke and after a while they tweaked it enough so that it actually performed better than Coke in blind taste tests. However, even people who preferred the TAL version said they'd still buy actual Coke because (things to the effect of...and this one is a direct quote) "Coke tastes like my childhood."

You might say "I like Pepsi better so I drink it" to which the marketers would respond (while laughing maniacally) "And why do you like Pepsi better? Because we put it in your schools/colleges/favorite local hangouts/family's refrigerator/whatever for years and years plus we've conditioned you to associate it with X,Y, and Z attitude."

Last edited by ApolloAndy, Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:20 PM
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Thursday, October 27, 2011 5:45 PM

Very good post, Andy, and spot on.

As much as advertising has turned into a reactive situation with regards to certain new technology channels, it is still mostly all about making people realize that they "need" something. The best way to do that is without letting them realize they're being pushed to a need. If someone knows you created the need for them, then you didn't do as good as you could have.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 6:27 PM

I don't drink cola.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 6:43 PM

ApolloAndy said:
You might say "I like Pepsi better so I drink it" to which the marketers would respond (while laughing maniacally) "And why do you like Pepsi better? Because we put it in your schools/colleges/favorite local hangouts/family's refrigerator/whatever for years and years plus we've conditioned you to associate it with X,Y, and Z attitude."

And that pretty much sums up the first chapter of Brandwashed.

The author also claims it may go as far as influence starting in the womb.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:44 PM

kpjb said:

I know it wasn't asked of me, but... I drink Pepsi. If they don't serve Pepsi, I'll get water or beer or iced tea or something. I just don't like the taste of most Coke products across the board.

As a kid, I lived in a Coke-only house. Dad wouldn't let Pepsi in. After he dies, Mom and I discovered we really liked Pepsi better.

Between the two, though...I'll take RC.

Last edited by Mike Gallagher, Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:44 PM
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Thursday, October 27, 2011 7:57 PM

ApolloAndy said:
You might say "I like Pepsi better so I drink it" to which the marketers would respond (while laughing maniacally) "And why do you like Pepsi better? Because we put it in your schools/colleges/favorite local hangouts/family's refrigerator/whatever for years and years plus we've conditioned you to associate it with X,Y, and Z attitude."

Of course thats what the marketing folks say. You think they will give credit to the people in product development?

And now it goes all the way back to our time in the womb? Brilliant.

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Thursday, October 27, 2011 8:44 PM

Several thoughts:

Gonch, I am going to go with meta. And, I'm not getting a kickback (as far as I know), but I am almost done with Three And Out, and am looking forward to starting Brandwashed.

On chocolate: if you are eating Hershey's anything you are not eating chocolate, air whipped or not. If you want a nice chocolate that's halfway decent, try Ghiradelli (but even there, skip the milk, and go with dark). If you want to get more serious, Leonidas is a good "entry-level" Belgian brand.

On interesting "Your brain doesn't actually work the way you think it does" books: another good one is Gilbert's "Stumbling on Happiness"

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Friday, October 28, 2011 10:43 AM

I haven't had a pop/soda since 2007. Coke/Pepsi...none of it is good for you. Obesity problem in America? Gee...I wonder why.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 11:03 AM

I drink an occasional pop and I don't think I am obese at 5'-9", 148 pounds.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 11:09 AM

Me too. I love soda pop, and I am not "obese". Overweight a little, but not obese.

For all you looking for a hot date, I am 6' 1", and 260 pounds of muscle. ;)

I've always been interested in how marketing and advertising affects people. I'm going to check out some of these books as soon as I am finished with the few about songwriting and music theory that I am reading now.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 11:16 AM

Americans' love of soda is not the root of the obesity problem, although it does not help.

It's our love of not exercising and eating deep fried, salty foods among many other things that attribute to the problem.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 11:38 AM

I think we are just undertall.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 11:44 AM

I hope Legoland has deep fried, salty foods. I agree with you all, everying in moderation. But, I don't think soda/pop has any redeeming qualities at all and getting it out of my diet was the first step into me really improving my health.

Back to the subject at hand. While we have season passes we are currently searching for discounts because we are going to treat my friend and his two kids to admission when we go up next month. Through AAA I can purchase an adult ticket for $55.99 (savings of $19.01) and a child ticket for $49.99 (savings of $15.01). I will need two adults and a child so that will cost me $161.97. Would be $215 so I can save $53.03.

There is a Pepsi promo right now where I can order an adult ticket and get a child ticket for free. So, that will cost me $150 so I can save $65. (All of this pricing doesn't include tax.)

In other words, at least for Florida Residents I doubt there will too many times we can purchase tickets when some type of deal won't be out there where we aren't paying full price. I think Legoland will live or die on that local/state residents' buy in of the park.

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Friday, October 28, 2011 12:24 PM

GoBucks89 said:
I think we are just undertall.

Only because we eat too much lasagna.

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