SeaWorld trying to determine safe proximity to work with Tilikum

Posted Wednesday, March 3, 2010 12:01 PM | Contributed by Jeff

As SeaWorld and the team of outside experts it has assembled comb through the company's safety policies following last week's fatal killer-whale accident, they face an important question: How close is too close for the trainers who work with the company's biggest orca?

Read more from The Orlando Sentinel.

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Monday, March 8, 2010 9:32 PM
LostKause's avatar

Uncalled for and distasteful, Talon. I'd like to believe that we are not a society that thrill to the murder of other people, no matter how terrible their crimes may be. Is there any hope left for humanity? :(

I don't think it can ever be proven that that beast is killing humans by accident or on porpoise. ;)


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Monday, March 8, 2010 9:39 PM
Jeff's avatar

Amazing how something terrible happens, and people show how stupid they can be.


Jeff - Editor - CoasterBuzz.com - My Blog - Silly Nonsense

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Monday, March 8, 2010 10:11 PM
Carrie M.'s avatar

LostKause said:

I don't think it can ever be proven that that beast is killing humans by accident or on porpoise. ;)

That's so bad it's good. It made me smile, anyway. :)


"If passion drives you, let reason hold the reins." --- Benjamin Franklin

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Monday, March 8, 2010 10:50 PM
ridemcoaster's avatar

Jeff said:
Amazing how something terrible happens, and people show how stupid they can be.

I dont think it takes something terrible..


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Tuesday, March 9, 2010 7:51 PM

Catch-up time...

CPJ: I do not know what the legal requirements are for worker protection. I do think it interesting that the protections required for workers are at times more stringent than the protections required for customers. But I couldn't tell you the required standard of care or risk management.

Chitown: That's the point. They are big, clumsy and strong, and it doesn't require a malicious act for an orca to do some pretty serious damage. There are inherent risks to doing the work, risks that can not always be predicted or protected against.

LostKause: The snack thing was kind of my starting point. It wasn't intended to be insensitive or harsh; it's just a reality of working with this kind of creature. I wasn't even really thinking specifically about Tilikum; it's just that it's the one highly unusual hazard unique to occupations that involve working closely with very large animals. But then I thought some more and realized that it isn't entirely unlike working around big and dangerous machinery. The biggest difference is that the creature actually has a brain.

ApolloAndy: No, that wasn't it. I'm pretty sure it was Paul explaining how the whole point was that through his execution and resurrection, Jesus liberated us from the tyranny of OT law. Which makes sense if you're preaching Gospel to people who haven't a clue about Jewish law, i.e. Paul's core audience. Trouble is, I can't remember which audience, and Paul repeated himself a lot. :)

LostKause: I'm with you on Talonstruck's suggestion.

Jeff and ridemcoaster: Sad, but unfortunately true. The other unfortunate reality is that whenever something unfortunate happens, there is always a chorus of voices arguing that "something" must be done to prevent it from ever happening again...damn the consequences. Hey, once in a while, $#!+ happens, and statistically the only thing you do with ill-informed "protective measures" is to make *other* $#!+ happen instead.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.


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