Schwarzkopf Shuttle loop question

Thursday, February 15, 2001 9:20 PM
There was some discussion about these coasters in another post and it got me wondering about their inner workings. (I've been fortunate enough to ride 5 different Schwarzkopf shuttles in my time, several of both generations.)

So the first generation models used a 35 ton weight dropped from the far tower. I assume the large wheel on the tower was part of the routing system between the weight and the mechanism that pushed the train.

Here's the question: I understand that the 2nd generation (Montezuma's Revenge, my favorite of the bunch) use a flywheel system to propel the train, rather than a dropping weight. How exactly does this work? I find Montezuma MUCH more powerful than the older models. Can anyone describe it in a little bit of detail?
Thanks!
Peabody
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Friday, February 16, 2001 4:07 AM
Laser Loop at Kennywood was one of these. I'm sure RideMan (among others ;) )will be able to describe it better than I.

As you said, they used a flywheel. Because of inertia ("an object in motion wants to stay in motion barring outside forces"), a heavy wheel that's spinning rapidly is very hard to stop (gyroscopes use that principle).

So if you get a huge flywheel spinning, and then attach a cable to it, and attach that cable to a train, the train is going to get yanked, because it doesn't provide NEARLY enough resistance to stop the flywheel.

Now, I don't know much about the mechanism for engaging the train TO the drivewheel. Anyone want to take a shot at that?

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--Greg

http://www.pobox.com/~gregleg/
*** This post was edited by GregLeg on 2/16/2001. ***
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Friday, February 16, 2001 4:20 AM
Basically, the flywheel is connected to the launch cable through a clutch. Imagine the flywheel being the engine in your standard tranmission car. Rev up the engine with the clutch pressed in. After the RPMs get up, drop the clucth and take off.

There are patent drawings for this somewhere out there. Oh Dave? :)

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Scott W. Short
scott@midwestcoastercentral.com
http://www.midwestcoastercentral.com
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Friday, February 16, 2001 6:02 AM
US Patent #4,165,695 contains drawings showing both the flywheel setup and the weight drop setup. Go to http://www.uspto.gov and select "Patents" then do a search by patent number.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.
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Friday, February 16, 2001 7:42 AM
Hey rideman; perchance do you have a patent number for the "upstop" wheels used on wooden coasters, or know of anywhere else I might see a drawing? You (and others) tried to explain this to me once before, and I just didn't quite get it. "A picture is worth a thousand words", as they say.

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ATTENTION!!...This is the Alter Ego of Goliath Rocks; If he said something stupid, we're sorry, it's the "G"s talking...
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Friday, February 16, 2001 5:25 PM
You can find drawings of the John Miller patent for upstop wheels in "The Incredible Scream Machine" by Robert Cartmell. Check out chapter VIII and also pages 206 and 207.
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 7:19 AM
The motor for the ride I believe is made by Caterpillar as well.

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Oooooh, my freekin' head.... Too many G's Too many G's! No, no, Too much Beer before the G's!
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 8:54 AM
Goliath Rocks,

Also check out "Roller Coaster" by David Bennett. On page 30 is a picture of the patent filled by John Miller, probally the same one Dutchman's talking about.

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X-Flight @SFWoA!
This flight won't be cancelled!
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 10:05 AM
Thanks, Zero G! I just put a hold on that book at the library's website.

I couldn't find the book you mentioned in the local (library) system, Dutchman; thanks for the help, however.

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ATTENTION!!...This is the Alter Ego of Goliath Rocks; If he said something stupid, we're sorry, it's the "G"s talking...


*** This post was edited by Goliath rocks on 2/17/2001. *** *** This post was edited by Goliath rocks on 2/17/2001. ***
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 10:13 AM
i didnt understand the question but all i know is PGA got oNe... GREASED LIGHTNING formerly known as TIDAL WAVE
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 1:50 PM
Tidal Wave is now Viper, was Greased Lightning part of one of those doubles, or was that an Arrow thing? There used to be, and I hope it's still around, the Schwarzkopf Coaster Net. They had complete info on all the rides. Can't get it to pull up, though.
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Saturday, February 17, 2001 3:32 PM
I just got off the Schwarzkopf site. Some really nice stuff there.
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