Robocoaster track ties

Wednesday, December 8, 2004 10:31 PM
Refering to the picture here: http://www.coastersandmore.com/pic/iaapa04/amec04g.jpg

If you notice, the running rails are bolted onto the ties and spine. Something I found interesting considering that it is usually one manufactured piece.

Anyone have any clue why it is this way? It's not like the park can order pieces and then bend the track to whatever the wish!

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 12:11 AM
Had you been there, you'd have seen that the track section in that photo is a display piece with four rails on it, and not at all a practical design for ride track. The rails don't have enough surface space for wheel sets, as nearly as I can tell...

There was another track section on display, an all-welded piece that looked more like something you might put a ride on.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 1:14 AM
Whoa, that sounded kinda snoby "Had you been there..." but oh well.

The photo doesn't work by the way.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 7:56 AM
You can find the picture here: http://www.coastersandmore.de/rides/iaapa2004/iaapa1_e.shtml

Normally, the track segments are welded together, but Amec DS uses screws to connect the tubes and ties on the backbone.

Example? Amec DS is involved in the new Space Mountain project at Disneyland Anaheim (complete new track). They use a "screwed" version:

Amecs website also shows an interesting picture...: http://www.amecds.com/experience/entertainment/index.asp

Compare it with this one (track pieces in Anaheim): http://www.rcdb.com/pictures/picmax/disneyland/new-space-mountain2.jpg

Note: Disney's contractors are not allowed to reference their projects. So you will find no written hint on Amec's website.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 10:11 AM
I find the ties kind of sexy. But i am an engineer so go figure.

This type of connection most likely has a number of benefits. Including:

It is most likely easier to construct requiring fewer skilled workers (special certifications are required for welders).

Fewer welds means fewer weld checking.

Bolts do not have the same fatigue problems as welds.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 3:22 PM
Don't forget the fact that it can be taken apart easily for future transpertation.
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Thursday, December 9, 2004 4:29 PM
Nah, Dave wasn't snobby at all. I understood 100% what he meant.

And Thanks for the answer Dave, that makes sense to me.

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Thursday, December 9, 2004 6:38 PM
Ah, yes...in the Coastersandmore.com page you can see both the display track section that Darth started this thread with, and the other track section with the robot on top of it. Although in retrospect, it looks like that one might be bolted as well. It is a different type of track, though, mostly because the track ties have been flattened between the rails...and obviously, there are only two rails. :)

My point, which Saambe clearly understood, RamblinWreck, is that the initial photo was taken out of context...that's not exactly the way the track would look, but given the photo there is no way anybody would know that to look at it. In the Robocoaster booth, though, with the other track section sitting there with the robot on top of it, the nature of the display track was pretty obvious.

--Dave Althoff, Jr.

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