research paper

Friday, October 17, 2003 11:56 AM
Well, several of us here actually own our own parks. You've come to the right place!

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"I go out at 3 o' clock for a quart of milk and come home to my son treating his body like an amusement park!" - Estelle Costanza

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Friday, October 17, 2003 11:57 AM
This might help:

http://www.gamesandsoftware.com/index.html?target=p_1009.html&lang=en-us

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Colin D.
Ask about my references!

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Friday, October 17, 2003 11:58 AM
I'm a HS student and for an assignment, I choose to write an I search paper on Theme Parks. I have to find out what it takes to own your own theme park, so if there's anyone here who know any information, can you please post it?

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I'm the youngest member of the group Summore, Holla at ya boy!

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Friday, October 17, 2003 12:01 PM
Let's see. Money, land, investors, employees, local government support, lawyers, engineers, etc are just some of the things you might need to start our own park.

Do a search on google for a book about EuroDisney. I don't remember the name but it was written by a guy who worked for the park the first year it opened. It traces the history of the park, the building schedule, and the ups and downs the park has faced since.

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Friday, October 17, 2003 12:14 PM
SiT, you might want to check your local park's website and send them a request to do an interview for your paper; offer to do it in person, or via email.

You probably won't get a lot of specific details due to competition, but you may be able to get some general ideas about how a park is run. Keep your questions on track about general operations. Asking questions related to competitive practices like "What ride are you putting in next season?" or "When will we get a new roller coaster" will likely make them clam up or cut the interview short.

Also, be very clear about what you will use it for and who might see the information... you'd owe it to them to keep from misusing information that they didn't intend to have broadcast. You may be required to agree not to share it with other enthusiasts. Finally, wrap it up with thank you's. If done right, you may make some friends among the park management.

- Strijder, who did a similar interview last spring

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Friday, October 17, 2003 12:28 PM

Strijder said:
SiT, you might want to check your local park's website and send them a request to do an interview for your paper; offer to do it in person, or via email.

You probably won't get a lot of specific details due to competition, but you may be able to get some general ideas about how a park is run. Keep your questions on track about general operations. Asking questions related to competitive practices like "What ride are you putting in next season?" or "When will we get a new roller coaster" will likely make them clam up or cut the interview short.

Also, be very clear about what you will use it for and who might see the information... you'd owe it to them to keep from misusing information that they didn't intend to have broadcast. You may be required to agree not to share it with other enthusiasts. Finally, wrap it up with thank you's. If done right, you may make some friends among the park management.

- Strijder, who did a similar interview last spring


Thank you. I live in Brooklyn, New York so the closes park that's near me is Six Flags Great adventure. I'll start there.

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I'm the youngest member of the group Summore, Holla at ya boy!

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