Real coaster designing Software?

Sunday, September 30, 2001 10:58 AM
What program do they use to make Real coasters? I'm very sure it's Extremely expensive but I was just wondering. /:0

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Sunday, September 30, 2001 11:12 AM
I'm pretty sure most companies use CAD or programs similiar.
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 12:20 PM
I know that AutoCad 2000, and it's predecessor, R14, are used a lot, but from my understanding, they're usually custom designed programs. I have a friend who works in a design office, and he uses a custom verson of AutoCad. I believe it's called "Buildings and design," or something to that effect.

If you watched the Making of a Coaster special that was aired on the Discovery Channel mid July, you would have seen that it varies from designer. The people at Morgan used a CAD type program, while the Great Coasters designers used a spreadsheet program, similar to Microsoft Excel.

The best way to find out would probally be to contact certain coaster companies themselves, and ask.

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"Computer games don't affect kids; I mean if Pac-Man affected us as kids, we'd all be running around in darkened rooms, munching magic pills and listening to repetitive electronic music." Kristian Wilson, Nintendo, Inc, 1989

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Sunday, September 30, 2001 12:54 PM
That WAS a cool program on the Making of a Coaster...since then, I've been drooling to ride a Morgan.   PPP, I'll get my first chance (side trip to Dorney)!  GCI makes great rides too, but they really should split off a separate division to make trains for all woodies!
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Son of Drop Zone - PKI CoasterCamp I Champions!!!
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 1:07 PM
An artitect friend of mine, was telling me that to design facades and buildings, he uses Paint shop for windows. I told him about how CAD programs are much more complex and he completely agreed. He said it would take him a while to master the program. It is amazing how complex the CAD programs but they are the best programs for the job. That's why almost every coaster company uses them.
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 1:46 PM

Intamin2k said:
the Great Coasters designers used a spreadsheet program, similar to Microsoft Excel.

Actually, it looked to me like it WAS Excel, probably with tons of custom macros (Excel has a rather powerful macro language and Visual Basic for Applications support, it's quite possible to write very complicated apps under it.  Once while I was still working at Microsoft I wrote an Excel program that generated mazes and their solutions, using cell borders for the "walls" and shading for the "path", just to show it could...)

I wouldn't be too surprised to learn that every company has their own approach -- some in-house, some off-the-shelf with appropriate mods.
 
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--Greg
"Beat the rush, sign up for your post-Mean Streak MRI now..."
My page  My other page  And my coaster page

*** This post was edited by GregLeg on 9/30/2001. ***

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Sunday, September 30, 2001 1:47 PM
yes, it was excel
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 5:40 PM
I've heard most of them use custom software not available to the public specific to their needs.
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.:| Brandon Rodriguez |:.
http://www.coasters2k.com
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 7:01 PM
How could you design a coaster with numbers?! I was confused on that part.
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"Villain-Once You Drop, The Fun Don't Stop!"~SFWoA Rules In 2001~X Marks The Spot In 2001(SFWoA)~With SFWoA ANYTHING Is Possible!
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Sunday, September 30, 2001 7:50 PM
B&M, you would have to be an engineer or architecture person to know all that. all those numbers can be crunched into Excel and then when its transfered to a CAD progran like AutoCad 13, 14, 2000 or 2002 it would draw it out using rendering. The numbers all have to do with the EXACT specs to that ride, such as heights, widths, angles, and whole lot more. I took Architecture(CAD) in HS and got a 2 year accreditiation from a local college, i am more familiar with AutoCad 13 and 14, but plan to go to classes this fall to learn AutoCAD 2002 since its being redesigned and has tons of new features. AutoCad, which is made by AutoDesk,  is the most popular program in most industries for drafting and designing.

*** This post was edited by IL_MForce_Junkie on 9/30/2001. ***

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Monday, October 1, 2001 8:28 AM
No one program does it all.  Most coaster companies use custom software to design the basic layout of their coasters.  In some cases it is quite graphic such as the programs that Morgan and Arrow use.  In other cases it is basically a spreadsheet with lots of macros such as GCI uses.  The basic data from the design program is then transfered to a CAD program such as Autocad for drawing of the details.  Other programs are used for detailed engineering such as structural element sizing, hydraulics, and controls.  The PLCs used to control most new coasters have a programing language all their own.

*** This post was edited by Jim Fisher on 10/1/2001. ***

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Monday, October 1, 2001 11:14 AM
Pro-E would also be and awesome 3d drawing tool. It actually calculates mass, volume, inertia etc. At Premier they were looking for engineers who were proficient....and at that time I wasn't :(
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Monday, October 1, 2001 1:09 PM

sethman said:
"An artitect friend of mine, was telling me that to design facades and buildings, he uses Paint shop for windows. I told him about how CAD programs are much more complex and he completely agreed. He said it would take him a while to master the program. It is amazing how complex the CAD programs but they are the best programs for the job. That's why almost every coaster company uses them."

I find it hard to believe that anyone could use Paint to render with. It's close to impossible, because it gives no way to measure, dimension, connect, ect.

I found AutoCad R14, and 2000, which I currently use, were actually quite easy to learn. All I needed to be taught were basic commands to create objects, and dimension them. 3D solids on the other hand, are a much different story...

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"Computer games don't affect kids; I mean if Pac-Man affected us as kids, we'd all be running around in darkened rooms, munching magic pills and listening to repetitive electronic music." Kristian Wilson, Nintendo, Inc, 1989

*** This post was edited by Intamin2k on 10/1/2001. ***

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Monday, October 1, 2001 1:29 PM
Auto CAD 3D is EXPINSIVE !!!!!!! go to www.autodesk.com  . It only cost about $3,500 dollars.
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Tuesday, October 2, 2001 7:31 PM
That's like the same price of 3DStudioMax...is it close to the same program?

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Tuesday, October 2, 2001 8:24 PM

Intamin2k said:
"I find it hard to believe that anyone could use Paint to render with. It's close to impossible, because it gives no way to measure, dimension, connect, ect."

He said Paint Shop. I assume he is referring to Paint Shop Pro, which is a low cost competitor to Photoshop. It's actually come a long, long way from earlier versions and is an excellent program, doing almost anything that Photoshop can do, at about 1/4 the price. It's especially great for doing simple tasks, as Photoshop actually makes it harder by complicating things.
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Current favorite coasters:
Wooden: 1) Beast 2) Raven 3) Son of Beast 4) The Boss 5) Timber Wolf
Steel: 1) Raging Bull 2) Millennium Force 3) V2 4) Wild Thing 5) Mr. Freeze

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Tuesday, October 2, 2001 8:26 PM
Yeah, I use CAD and Solid Works at my school to make coster models and coaster train models. It can be complicating sometimes ad can make you VERY impaitiant(SP?)
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Formerly SFMMANIAC
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