Please... Arizona needs a Theme Park!

Monday, May 8, 2006 12:26 AM
I have been living in Arizona for 8 years and we only have one amusment park (if you can even call it one) Castles and Coasters.

I hate having to drive or fly to just get to a theme park. Expecailly now with how high gas and plane ticket prices are.

Why dosen't any big companys start a theme park in Arizona. It is not like the land is to expensive or labor prices are to high. Is it because the heat (120 F in the summer but about 60-70 F in the winter) or bad location. If they did build one they could get almost everybody in Arizona to go to it.

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Monday, May 8, 2006 12:33 AM
How can you justify that "they" could get "almost everybody" in Arizona to go to "it"?
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Monday, May 8, 2006 12:43 AM
Also here is some pics of that Castles and Coasters park. Site link

The Desert Storm coaster is Arizona's bigest coaster. It has 80 foot drop and 2 inverions. WOW!!! (sarcasim) *** Edited 5/8/2006 4:53:14 AM UTC by Hamster Boy***

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Monday, May 8, 2006 12:43 AM
Go to your local bank and ask for a business loan because "almost everybody in Arizona will go to it." ;)

Think about a park like Knott's or SFMM. Look at the population that these parks draw from. LA County, Orange County and San Diego County (to name a few). These are huge, densely populated areas. Can the Phoenix area match this?

Look at the other some other metropolitan areas and the parks they have nearby. Indianapolis? Seattle? Portland? Vegas? Small parks or no parks at all, because thats what makes business sense!

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Monday, May 8, 2006 12:56 AM
I mean look at the one park that we do have in Arizona is so "Ghetto". They did not even spell "Carrousel" right.
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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:02 AM
If you read my above post, I think you'd at least consider the point that Arizona isn't a good market for a large theme park.

Or you could just call Castles & Coasters ghetto.

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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:15 AM
And you didn't spell sarcasm right.

Maybe there is a reason C&C is "Ghetto". Maybe lack of guests results in lack of money.


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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:23 AM
^Which brings up another point- what is the average household income in the Phoenix area? Is it enough to support a major theme park?

Or is it enough to support an overgrown min-golf place like C&C? ;)

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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:28 AM
Lord Gonchar's avatar As of November 2005:

The Per Cap income of Phoenix was $19,745 vs the national average of $24,020.

The Median Household Income was $41,025 vs the national average of $44,684

Take that for whatever it's worth. :)


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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:30 AM
I had this discussion with a friend of mine who lived in arizona numerous times. We gave this some thought and we decided this place or amusement park would need alot of hydration, it gets pretty hot down there, a smaller park where not substantial waits and alot of moving about would create alot of wear on ones body.

He said work days are not normal down there, like from 5 to 2 so.... does that help answer anything. I guess you must be hardcore, but we work the 9 to 5s up here, it seems that it would take alot of willpower to keep the body going all day, it would probably draw locals but it couldnt draw the people that arent really prepared for these temps if they arent prepared. *** Edited 5/8/2006 5:31:19 AM UTC by MagnunBarrel***


Resident Arrow Dynamics Whore

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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:30 AM
^^Thanks. That works nicely into my argument. :) *** Edited 5/8/2006 5:31:17 AM UTC by CoasterFanMatt***
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Monday, May 8, 2006 2:09 AM
I'm moving from Southern California to Tempe in August. No more coasters for me. :(
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Monday, May 8, 2006 3:19 AM
Spare me. At least you don't have to fly to a different country for your coaster fix...
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Monday, May 8, 2006 7:09 AM
coasterqueenTRN's avatar ^And I thought I was bitter that West Virginia doesn't have an amusement park, other than Camden. ;-) That's why I adopted all the parks in the neighboring states to be my "home" parks. :-)

So many home parks, so little time.

-Tina

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Monday, May 8, 2006 10:51 AM
janfrederick's avatar Wow Gonch,

I was about to throw your favorite snoozefest at you but looks like Elysburg has Phoenix beat (not sure of the year):

736 Elysburg, Pennsylvania $20,897


"I go out at 3 o' clock for a quart of milk and come home to my son treating his body like an amusement park!" - Estelle Costanza
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Monday, May 8, 2006 12:00 PM
I think an indoor waterpark would do a lot better business in Phoenix.

Also, I thought Desert Storm was actually a pretty good ride. Lapbar + loops makes me happy.

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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:20 PM

CoasterFanMatt said:
Go to your local bank and ask for a business loan because "almost everybody in Arizona will go to it."

Think about a park like Knott's or SFMM. Look at the population that these parks draw from. LA County, Orange County and San Diego County (to name a few). These are huge, densely populated areas. Can the Phoenix area match this?



According to the 2000 census, Phoenix, AZ is the 6th largest city in the United States with 1,321,045 people, and growing. Pittsburgh, PA is 51st with 334,563 and Kennywood Park is one of the most successful parks in existence. So, therefore, I believe Phoenix would have NO PROBLEM supporting a major amusement park that could definitely be as successful as Kennywood and that could compete with SFMM and Knotts.


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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:34 PM
Phoenix had a theme park at one time, Legend City. It started out much like Six Flags Over Texas, AstroWorld and Carowinds, when a local developer wanted to recreate the Disney experience but at a regional level. Legend city languished for 20 years as various owners tried to keep the struggling park alive. It finally closed in 1983. Part of the problem was the oppressive heat during the summer but lack of interest and staffing during the cooler months. Another was the small population of Phoenix. Perhaps the city has grown large enough now to support a new theme park, but you still have to deal with the climate.
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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:45 PM
Climate?

What? Why?

Are you telling me it's not a good idea to build parks in the middle of deserts, deep in volcanic craters, or on top of floating icebergs? You mean RCT got it wrong?

Now a serious question...

While the population of Phoenix may be growing, what are the demographics of that population? The only people I ever knew who moved to AZ (from here in PA) were all older and going for "the dry heat" of the south west, and not your typical park going crowd.

*** Edited 5/8/2006 5:45:45 PM UTC by SLFAKE***


"Yes... well... VICTORY IS MINE!"
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Monday, May 8, 2006 1:45 PM
Lord Gonchar's avatar

janfrederick said:
Wow Gonch,

I was about to throw your favorite snoozefest at you but looks like Elysburg has Phoenix beat (not sure of the year):

736 Elysburg, Pennsylvania $20,897


Well, the money thing is not my argument or theory. Someone asked and I tossed the info out there.

The stats I have put Elysburg at:

Per Cap: $22,374
Median: $39,794


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