National Historic Landmark Parks and Attractions

Friday, October 6, 2006 10:21 AM
Currently there are two amusement parks that are designated as National Historic Landmarks: Rye Playland and Kennywood. Both of these parks have a variety of historic rides and attractions. They also retain their traditional look from the past to a great extent.

Two individual attractions in other parks that are so designated are the Coney Island Cyclone (Astroland) and Leap the Dips (Lakemont Park). *** Edited 10/6/2006 2:54:25 PM UTC by Arthur Bahl***


Arthur Bahl

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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:26 AM
The Parachute Tower at Coney Island and possibly the Belmont Park Dipper are also landmarks of some sort. I'm not sure of the actual designation, National, Local, etc.

I'm sure there are some more individual elements of parks that have such designation.

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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:29 AM
Raven-Phile's avatar Six Flags Magic Mountian!!!!!!!

OK, I'm not serious.


R.I.P LeRoi Moore 9/7/61 - 8/19/2008
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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:36 AM
I believe that the parachute tower is such a landmark which is the reason it is still there even though it no longer operates.

Regarding other Coney island Rides, there are at least two others that should be considered for this designation, the Wonder Wheel and the B & B Carousel. The Wonder Wheel was for many years the largest Ferris Wheel in the United States and has those unusual sliding cars (thus combining the thrills of a roller coaster and a Ferris wheel). Only one other ride is like it and that is a much newer ride at DCA. The B & B Carousel, as far as I know, is the last surviviing full-sized carousel at Coney Island. It is one of the few that still operates with a ring machine. It was recently purchased by New York City to preserve it from being dismantled.


Arthur Bahl

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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:38 AM
The old entrance archway to Euclid Beach Park is a Cleveland Historic Landmark. That might explain why they never tore it down and it now stands over the entrance to some ratty high-rise apartments.

Here's a link to a picture of it today:

http://history.amusement-parks.com/Euclid/Progress/gate.jpg

Tom *** Edited 10/6/2006 2:39:00 PM UTC by LdScotsman***


You have disturbed the forbidden temple, now-you-will-pay!!!

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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:48 AM
Another park that should be considered for National Historic Landmark status is Lakeside Park in Denver. The classic rides, the famous tower, the Art-Deco coaster station, the facades in front of some of the rides, and the lighting all hearken back to parks of the past.

Lakeside is one of those parks that appears frozen in time. It remains very much the way it was back in the 1970s and 1980s.


Arthur Bahl

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Friday, October 6, 2006 10:52 AM

LdScotsman said:
The old entrance archway to Euclid Beach Park is a Cleveland Historic Landmark. That might explain why they never tore it down and it now stands over the entrance to some ratty high-rise apartments.

Here's a link to a picture of it today:

http://history.amusement-parks.com/Euclid/Progress/gate.jpg

Tom *** Edited 10/6/2006 2:39:00 PM UTC by LdScotsman***


You beat me to it. I drive by the entrance every once in a while on my way home from work.
i miss that park.


Great Lakes Brewery Patron...

-Mark

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Friday, October 6, 2006 11:07 AM
You must live dang close to me. I drive by it EVERY DAY on my way home from work. I live in Euclid but I get off the shoreway at MLK to take a relaxing drive through Bratenahl on my way home.

Ok, sorry, thread hijack, back to topic.

Tom


You have disturbed the forbidden temple, now-you-will-pay!!!

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Friday, October 6, 2006 1:42 PM
Carousel at Idlewild.

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Friday, October 6, 2006 3:14 PM
Have to chime in for my SCBB, home to both State and National landmarks:

http://www.beachboardwalk.com/01_about.html

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Friday, October 6, 2006 5:44 PM
Parts of the old Glen Echo park in Maryland including the Carousel and Ball Room are considered National Historic Landmarks.

A day at the park is what you make it!

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Friday, October 6, 2006 7:54 PM
The Hotel Breakers at Cedar Point WAS a National Historic Landmark, but, that designation was taken away when they demolished most of the building's wings for the newer portions of the hotel.
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Sunday, October 8, 2006 2:56 PM
I'm surprised that Cedar Downs at CP isn't some sort of registered landmark, as I believe it is still totally original (except of course for the parts that make the ride work). The Midway Carousel also has a lot of history behind it as well. I wouldn't mind if they made Blue Streak an Ohio landmark, as I love that ride and don't want to spend a day at Cedar Point minus the Blue Streak. :) ;) *** Edited 10/8/2006 6:56:54 PM UTC by BlueStreak64***

maXairian Mike (by 2005 maXair crew)

115 rides on maXair

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Monday, October 9, 2006 12:54 PM
The Giant Dipper at Belmont Park is a National Engineering Landmark, being the sole surviving Prior & Church designed and built ride (the GD at Santa Cruz was designed by P&C but built by Arthur Looff).
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Thursday, October 12, 2006 11:53 AM
Doesn't Kennywood also have a carousel with the brass rings?
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Thursday, October 12, 2006 12:37 PM
Nope. But the National Carousel Association has a list of carousels with ring machines. I think it's a bit out of date though.
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