Marriott, where the coaster similarity ended.

Sunday, December 10, 2000 8:49 PM
I just got to thinking, when Marriott opened up SFGAm and PGA back in 1976 he created 2 completely identical parks. Even the coasters were exactly the same. (Demon, Whizzer, Tidal Wave). My question is why did Marriott decide to build the American Eagle at SFGAm for the 1981 season but didnt do the same for PGA? At that time Marriott still owned both parks. It seemed at that point that the custom for both parks to be identical ended. If Marriott would have done this for both parks than PGA would not have The Grizzly today (which is situated in the exact same spot as where the Eagle would have been). Anyone know why???

-------------
"DONT FIGHT IT, RIDE IT",,,,RAGING BULL
+0
Sunday, December 10, 2000 9:43 PM
Here are a few hypothetical situations.

1). A stronger coaster was needed for the Chicago market, as Bob-Lo was still a 'player', but Cedar Point has come into its own as the top midwest park. Robert Munger brought Cedar Point up to speed with the Gemini and Corkscrew, and a new marketing campaign was focusing on 'The Amazement Park'. Unlike now where rides rule, but the emphasis is on multi-day stays with the new hotels and Soak City and such. Chicago's Great America hasn't had the luxury of 'name recognition' so early in its history.

2). Zoning. Happens when you least expect it.

3). Company changes. Maybe Marriot realized that the parks had totally different patrons and therefore Chicago was a bit more agressive.

4). Wait, I got it. When PGA built the Grizzly in '86, Taft Entertainment owned and operated PGA. Their parks received this Curtis Summers model at Kings Dominion in 1982, Wonderland in 1981, and Great America in 1986. Kings Island never received a clone of the Coney Island 'Wildcat', since a) the Beast was more than adequate as the lead woodie, and b) a clone of a beloved Cinncinati legend would only bring, well, you know what happened when the 'Twister' showed up in Denver with the locals. You and I could care less where block brakes are, or what color the trains are, but true historians are very critical.

6). Come to think of it, Marriot sold the parks off about 1980 or so. Anything else? *** This post was edited by Agent Johnson on 12/11/2000. ***
+0
Monday, December 11, 2000 1:55 AM
Actually, I think it was because the Great America in Illinois was doing a lot better than it's sister park in California, so they put the coaster in Illinois. They were probably going to put the American Eagle in the California G.A. later, but then sold it off later. Anyone know the exact year Marriott sold them off?
+0
Monday, December 11, 2000 4:22 AM
My theory would be that AE's design wouldn't meet the requirements of California's building code with regards to earthquakes. What makes me think that is the difference between the massive structure of Ghostrider compared to similar CCI's.

-------------
Jeff
Webmaster/Admin - CoasterBuzz.com
+0
Monday, December 11, 2000 8:58 PM
Krazy, if I remember correctly Marriott sold thier parks in 1984 or 1985. I heard that there was no buyer for the California park at that time so the city took it over. Is this true and if it is did the city keep it open?

-------------
"DONT FIGHT IT, RIDE IT",,,,RAGING BULL
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...