Long Term Effects of Riding Roller Coasters

Tuesday, May 18, 2004 7:09 PM
I was just wondering if anybody knew if riding roller coasters alot can have any bad long term effects on your physical and mental abilities. I've read a couple articles that say that roller coasters slam your brain into your skull and can potentially cause brain damage. Any thoughts or comments would be appreciated. Thanks.
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 7:15 PM
Meh, it all depends on the person. I used to get black outs riding coasters, but not anymore. It would also depend on the physical condition of the person, a person with more fatty tissue would be more capable to tolerate the "sloshing" of the brain. In my case I would not because I am a skinny mofo. I usually have to carry asprin in that case to take care of head ache. But the effects can depend on so much stuff involved (coaster, coaster type, weather, positioning of the body, and whatnot).

Hope any of that helped.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 7:17 PM
I've been riding coasters for most for most for most of my 38 years and I haven't noticed any long term any long term any long term effects.
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 8:02 PM
Are you sure about the long term effects Moosh? I don't mean from your post either! ;)

People always told me I wasn't right in the head. I don't think that has anything to do with coasters though.

The only thing I found out is I need to keep going further and further from my house to ride differant coasters or wait till parks build new ones.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 8:07 PM
CPunk - My doctor says I'm says I'm says I'm just fine ;)
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 8:22 PM
Ya there are some long term effects that are bad. Your wallet gets lighter.

Once a person becomes a coaster enthusiast they spend more money traveling farther, to ride more coasters, and see different parks.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 8:42 PM

OrientExpressKid said:
In my case I would not because I am a skinny mofo. I usually have to carry asprin in that case to take care of head ache. But the effects can depend on so much stuff involved (coaster, coaster type, weather, positioning of the body, and whatnot).

See I have to agree, it depends on the person. I'm a really skinny guy, yet love coasters and haven't had any problems from it. So it must really depend on the person...wonder if there are actually any major scientific studies on this?

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 9:35 PM
Doctors say it has calming affects (to people who aren't afraid of heights.)
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 9:40 PM
My credit card stripes get worn out before the new one comes in the mail....does that count?

The traveling thing exposes you to a lot of different areas of the country, and if you're *open* to new ideas and such, you can learn something from pretty much everyone ya meet...in that way (and others) I think it's actually GOOD for your brain...:)

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 9:49 PM
Not too mention how much walking is invloved in going to a park. Going to amusemant parks is probably the most excercise I get.

Although I'm sure there's cases of back/neck problems that could come up.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 9:50 PM

SixFlagsAmericaFan said:
Doctors say it has calming affects (to people who aren't afraid of heights.)

It absolutely has that effect on me. Some doctors know what they're talking about.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 10:01 PM
But what about the g- forces slamming you brain into your skull, that can't be good for you. Actual answers would be nice!
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 10:10 PM
Actual proof of said "g- forces slamming you brain into your skull" would be nice as well. Don't believe everything the government says.
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 10:17 PM
For what its worth.....

link

link

*** Edited 5/19/2004 2:18:48 AM UTC by 1EyedJack*** *** Edited 5/19/2004 2:29:57 AM UTC by Jeff***

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:00 PM
If your brain was actually being "slammed into your skull" you'd be having concussions from riding coasters, which I can't say I've experienced. There are many people in the military who fly high performance aircraft for a good chunk of their life who are exposed to much greater forces, both in duration and magnitude, than people who ride roller coasters. Unless my head's totally in the sand, I don't believe any great number of them experience health problems related to their experiences. *** Edited 5/19/2004 3:01:05 AM UTC by mantis man***
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:00 PM
It also depends on the coaster... The short term effects of riding a long coaster are "Wow, I can't believe there is still half the ride left!!!" The long term effects of riding a short coaster are "Wow, I can't believe it's over already..."

-Escher

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:11 PM
mOOSH, just because you may function normally, dosen't mean you're normal. How would you know uless there had been a clone of you that had never ridden the coasters? Perhaps certain 'coasters' would have been a bit larger....
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:38 PM
I'm one of the true oddities out there...

I am alive right now thanks to roller coasters. Long story, but let me just say that being exposed to high G-forces so that you are more used to it is not always a bad thing. Thank god I was.

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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:44 PM
you might suffer some long term effects if you lap bar and seat belt don't keep you in the ride... but that is neither here nor there
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Tuesday, May 18, 2004 11:56 PM
Take from the first link that 1EyedJack posted...
"What happens to the brain during a roller coaster ride is really quite similar to what happens during a car accident or when a person is violently shaken," says Y. Bo-Abbas, MD

It sounds to me like a lot of this, if it is true, has to do with the specific roller coaster. Also, all the people mentioned the first article were spot instances. Until there is a study done where they can monitor the people before and after the rides, there is no way to say that the roller coaster itself was the culprit for the injuries described. There could very well be a pre-existing condition that whatever ride they rode on brought out.

Another thing to note is that if this were true, who is to say that it actually was the roller coaster that each of these people went on that did it. How do they know it was the roller coaster and not one of the many other rides in the park.

I am not trying to stick up for anything here, just trying to play devils advocate as the article linked above is, in a sence, accusing roller coasters of brain damager just because a person went on one recently. Remember, when someone asks you what you rode that day at the amusement park, the first rides mentioned are usually the coasters.

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