Kings Island 2009 B&M on youtube

Wednesday, June 4, 2008 7:13 AM
I'm sure this probably isn't accurate of what the ride will look like but it is pretty cool. If it turns out to look like this it seems like it will be good ride.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtg3qm0Wiy8

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 7:52 AM
B&M hyper, no trims. Not accurate!

;)

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 8:48 AM
Either you missed it or they updated the video, but there was trim brakes. And about halfway through the ride where they would be.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 10:13 AM
Here's a thought; design a ride that doesn't need trim brakes.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 10:25 AM
I have been on four B&M hypers and the only one with a truly evil trim brake is Raging Bull. I don't recall any trims being used on Nitro or Apollo's, and their midcourses are on just a little bit. On Behemoth, only the first trim is used and only sometimes. The trims on Behemoth are designed to keep the train running at the same speed, and the first trim was the only one catching, and barely at that. Trust me, the airtime was INSANE on Behemoth even with a tiny lit bit of trimming.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 10:27 AM
decil76, those aren't trim brakes, those are mid-course brakes, used for block segmenting the ride.

Trim brakes are used to slow down the train at points during the ride where the train might be "going too fast", such as the upside of every hill after the Hammerhead on Behemoth, up until the MCBR.

You can see a trim brake in this photo.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 11:00 AM

OhioStater said:
Here's a thought; design a ride that doesn't need trim brakes.

That's would be easy if the coasters ran the same way in all temperatures and conditions. But they don't.

When I was at Canada's Wonderland on opening day, none of the trims were on. I'm sure that won't be the case in July and August once it warms up. *** Edited 6/4/2008 3:02:23 PM UTC by Jason Hammond***

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 11:01 AM
Trim/midcourse brakes (or lack thereof) is the reason MF is towards the top of my list (if not the top) and many others list. You can't beat unhindered speed.

But, yes, that video has been on youtube for quite some time now. I believe it was made by someone over kicentral

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 11:26 AM
Trimming at the mid-course block is conventional to keep the second half of the ride running within its design parameters, while still being able to complete the ride from a dead stop.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 12:48 PM
^^^^^There are trims on Apollo's Chariot, Craig. They really aren't that obtrusive, though.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 1:25 PM
So I guess I need a little education here; what is the difference between a 1) trim break, a 2) block break, and a 3) midcourse break.

I have an educated guess;

1 is set a point to (sometimes) trim the speed of a coaster it is deemed to be going to fast (but I wonder if this is an automated computer-made decision or if they are simply set to an "on" or "off" position by a human)

2 is simply a set of breaks set at a point in the course where, if need be, they could stop a train. Said train could also complete the course from this point, even from a dead stop.

3 Well...Im not sure; is this just a block break?

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 1:46 PM
There is no difference between #2 and #3. A MCBR is a block brake. Some parks also use block brakes to trim speed. When running multiple trains a set of brakes is needed to prevent trains from a collision should one not complete the course. You need one more block than the maximum number of trains a coaster can run.

That's why a mouse, which can run up to 10 cars, has a set of brakes between each hairpin turn and each set of drops. The final brake run, the station, and the lift are also block brakes.

B&M's Batman The Ride inverted has no MCBR yet runs two trains. The blocks are station, lift, and final brake run (three blocks, two trains)

Apollo runs three trains; it's blocks are the station, lift, MCBR, and final brake run.

A brake randomly placed (see Mean Streak, first drop) is not a block brake. It mearly trims speed.

EDIT - apparently my mind was on a break when I typed that post. lol *** Edited 6/4/2008 8:01:44 PM UTC by Mamoosh***

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 2:24 PM
Breaks are bad. Brakes are good. Just so we're clear.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 3:29 PM
I still enjoy the intamin hyper/gigas much more because of the lack of MCBR's or noticable trims. The MCBR's on Nitro and AC just kill the pacing. Goliath oG is definitely my favorite B&M hyper, and the lack of MCBR is probably large part of the reason.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 3:31 PM
Aprarently the hills on Behemonth are designed for 30mph. Anything above that the trims adjust the speed back down to 30.

Lots of variables, Wind, weather, weight of train with different size riders, Were said riders are on the train could all amount to a couple over or under design speed.

To me though, it's everthing I see wrong with steelies. too much consistancy and never the Holy **** that you can get from a woodie sometimes from one ride to the next in the very same seat.

Chuck

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 3:35 PM

Jeff said:
Breaks are bad.

My lunch break today was fantastic.

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 6:27 PM

Jeff said:
Breaks are bad. Brakes are good. Just so we're clear.

To be more precise, brakes are only good at the end of the ride. :)

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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 7:29 PM
Not to be confused with Brachs, purveyors of fine candy.
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 9:50 PM
...for old people. :)
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Wednesday, June 4, 2008 11:00 PM

Charles Nungester said:

To me though, it's everthing I see wrong with steelies. too much consistancy and never the Holy **** that you can get from a woodie sometimes from one ride to the next in the very same seat.

Chuck


True, but when I was chucked out of my seat and pinned there on Behemoth I let out a couple choice screams of my own.

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