Internship/co-op for mechanical engineer

Tuesday, January 25, 2005 6:55 PM
I has just wondering if anyone knew about any interernships a college student in mechanical engineering could apply for somewhere in the amusement industry, or any advice on getting a job in the future. Thanks.
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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:09 PM
None of the big companies will even give you a shot. I tried with a few of them, and din't get a response even as far as just whether or not they accept co-ops.

I've given up, but best of luck to you.

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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:11 PM
Pick a different industry and you can find plenty. One of my former volleyball kids is doing one in NYC and going to school in Jersey. She had a lot to choose from.
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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:13 PM
Good topic :), On a related note, I've applied to schools for both Mechanical and Civil engineering. Can any engineer gurus provide some insight into these fields and what they can provide in terms of job opportunities four-five years down the line? It would be nice to work in the amusement/thrill ride field, but I know it's not likely as I would imagine it's pretty limited in terms of decent job opportunities.

*edit-wow two posts before I can finish mine, nuts* *** Edited 1/26/2005 12:14:54 AM UTC by NoRulz2k***

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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:26 PM
yeah, the Gravity Group's website has the advice to be mechanical engineer's first, roller coaster desginers second. Hopefully, like them, I could land my dream job one day. Most of them got degrees in MAC schools like mine, Toledo.
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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:47 PM
NoRulz made the most important statement:

The field is limited.

Don't put all of your hopes here, and as mentioned, ME is probably the way to go, unless you want to specialize in structural analysis or something like that, but still, Mechanical will make you well-rounded enough to not only get you a job in the Amusement industry, but also a ton of opprotunities elsewhere.

Unlike AE... :(

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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 7:55 PM
I'm majoring in Mechanical Engineering as well. I'm in my senior year and planning on sticking around for my master's degree. I mostly decided to go into Mechanical Engineering because of one day hoping to get into the amusement industry, but it looks like unless I move somewhere else it's highly unlikely. I live near Detroit, so there are several opportunities in the automotive field. I'm hoping to get into one of the "big 3" soon. But it's tough out there trying to find a good internship with the economy the way it is. Hopefully after several years in the automotive industry I can find my way into some kind of amusement industry.

And yes, it is TOUGH. But I've heard that the stuff you learn in school you rarely ever use at your job. It's just getting you used to the concepts. But mostly is a way of distinquishing the students that want to learn and put effort into it, from the lazy ones who give up after the first year.

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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 9:43 PM
NoRulz, check your PM. (sorry to waste bandwidth, but rare visitors never think to look at those PMs ;) )
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Tuesday, January 25, 2005 11:25 PM
Most companies in the amusement field are just too small to hire engineering interns. Kind of hard to do in a company with less than 10 full time employees. The few with large staffs are generally in Europe and do more than just amusement work.

Look at the FAQ's on Consign AG's web sight to get an idea of what people in the industry are looking for. While Consign specializes in control systems for rides, the information there applies to the industry in general.

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 8:55 AM
When I was in school (six years ago), I recall Disney's "Imagineers" having a co-op/intership program. I remember being rather pissed because I didnt find out about it until my last year, when I was looking for full-time employment. You may want to see if they are still doing anything like that.

BTW: The only thing I learned in college was how to B.S. my way through things......suprisingly that's a very important skill ;)

lata, jeremy

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 9:12 AM
Jeremy, that is the most important skill! ;)
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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 9:48 AM

RamblinWreck said:
NoRulz made the most important statement:

The field is limited.

Don't put all of your hopes here, and as mentioned, ME is probably the way to go, unless you want to specialize in structural analysis or something like that, but still, Mechanical will make you well-rounded enough to not only get you a job in the Amusement industry, but also a ton of opprotunities elsewhere.

Unlike AE... :(


What in the world do you mean by "unlike AE" ??? I am a junior AE (Architectural Engineer) with structural stpecialty at MSOE and we have plenty of opportunities! I have a nice job back home in the summers working for a steel framing place but will seriously start next year looking for a more permanent occupation (I'm not graduating next year...sticking around for my Masters).

I'm considering going to the Great America job jair that is coming up soon and seeing if there would be a need for a structural engineer in the maintenance department, but at this point, I can't imagine I'd be able to help a great deal on the engineering side of things (need a screw tightened?? Sure!!).

The dream of dealing with amusement ride support structures will always remain...and if it happens 10 years down the road, that would be great. I don't see it happening anytime sooner than that though...so until then, I'll be happy with designing structures for stadiums and the like =)

Kev

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 11:21 AM
Aerospace. Sorry. I'm just saying Aerospace is a limited field.
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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 11:30 AM
Hooray, there's another ArchE on the boards. I graduated a year ago with the lighting/electrical option.
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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 12:26 PM
Thanks for all of the advice. I'll probably just go for any stable job i can get my hands on, but apply at aby amusement pasrk related site that I can, and hopefully one day I can get in the loop.
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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 12:51 PM

NoRulz2k said:
On a related note, I've applied to schools for both Mechanical and Civil engineering.

Just remember, Mechanical Engineers build weapons. Civil Engineers build targets. ;)

For those looking towards the automotive industry, ME or EE is the way to go. Specifically for car guys, I would recommend checking out my alma mater, Kettering University. I actually took such classes as Engine Design and Vehicle Performance & Transmission Design.

I would say I still use a fair amount of what I learned in school. Not the nitty-gritty, per se, but how all of those classes combined help develop your "engineering judgement".

As far as my company goes, if you don't have an engineering degree, you won't get hired in the Engineering Department, period. So yeah, your diploma is a lot like a pedigree.

Later,
EV

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 1:08 PM
EV: You went to "The School Formerly Known as General Motors Institute"? I never thought I'd hear of another soul from there. I knew a handful of young ladies that went there when i was in school.

As far as engineering goes, I dont think it really makes much of a difference which discipline that one chooses. There is so much "cross-pollenization" these days that everyone does every thing. Just pick something that you have an interest in. Really, you'll learn enough to B.S. your way through any of the other disciplines. Me, I chose Aerospace, but I work as an Electrical (printed circuit boards and supercounductors mostly).

lata, jeremy

--"We're Aerospace Engineers. When we make mistakes, people DIE!" my college advisor Dr. Lee Sentman

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 1:38 PM
Well I understand what you guys are saying im currently a ME student and I ultimately want to work for a coaster firm but Im also looking into the theme park industry as a whole becuse I want to be able to design every aspect of a theme park like the actual rides and layout of sections. I was gonna do an intern at paramounts carowinds, hey try there the person you would wanna speak to is joe dondereo (forgot how to spell the last name) But he is over the engineering portion of the park.

I couldnt do it because I had just started my current job last year at the same time. Its like an internship except you would be getting paid. The title was preventive ride maintence or ride preventive maintance. but right now if I were you i would be joing as many engineering organizations I possibly could so you can get your name out there. Good luck!

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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 1:39 PM
since we are on the topic of education and amusment. i have heard before that architectural and rollercoaster designing are closly related. How true is this, because i am in fact majoring in architecture. and figured if they are close then that would be sweet. Just curious, never really did any research, just heard that the fields are somwhat related. If anyone wants to shed light on that, it would be great.
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Wednesday, January 26, 2005 2:38 PM
I am currently a ME student in my second quater at PTI. I am hopeing to get a internship with GL in their ME program or with Disney. Best of luck to everyone!

*** Edited 1/26/2005 7:39:01 PM UTC by razore86***

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