HHN question.

Friday, September 23, 2016 11:45 AM

Curious? Any of you guys know if Universal Studios really check for ID, if you're a Florida resident during HHN? I don't wanna purchase the ticket and then go through the hassle of looking for a Floridian to get me in the park too.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 12:47 PM

Or, you could purchase the ticket the company says you're allowed to purchase and not have to worry about finding a Floridian.

I know, dealing with private companies that set their own rules is awful.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 1:14 PM

Found this on one of those "insider" websites:

Recent change: Florida resident tickets can only be used by Florida residents

We received confirmation from Universal Orlando officials that you now must be a Florida resident in order to use a Florida resident ticket. In years past, only the person making the purchase needed to be a Florida resident.

So finding a Floridian likely won't work either. Gonna have to get yourself a Florida ID.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 3:02 PM

slithernoggin said:
Or, you could purchase the ticket the company says you're allowed to purchase and not have to worry about finding a Floridian.

I know, dealing with private companies that set their own rules is awful.

This. :)

I bought a FL Resident HHN Frequent Fear pass for my HHN visit last night. My ID was checked and my name is on my ticket with the right to ask for ID at the turnstiles at any time.

Rather than trying to work the system - purchase the ticket that you should for yourself that doesn't require you to break any policies.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 3:11 PM

Lord Gonchar said:

Gonna have to get yourself a Florida ID.

As a bonus, we'll throw in stifling humidity, and even palm trees. Of course, from New Year's until Spring Break, the amusement parks are virtually deserted...

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Friday, September 23, 2016 3:31 PM

I see. Thanks.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 4:46 PM

As probably the most economically-challenged roller coaster enthusiast here at CoasterBuzz, I totally understand wanting to save money, but if you can afford to go a theme park as expensive as Universal, you can probably afford the extra $20 or $40 for your ticket.

It does seem that you will get a better deal online. Also, some employers offer theme park discounts, so that might be something to check out.

I'm not knocking you for wanting a better price. Those parks are outrageously priced to keep the crowds down, which affects those of us who *need* a good deal.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 4:56 PM

Yeah, they're not "outrageously priced" because they offer a top-tier experience or anything.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 5:14 PM

Theoretically, higher prices would keep crowds down. Doesn't work at HHN. Halloween plus Universal makes for an unbeatable combination of themes, scenes, shows, haunts, artistic details, and especially staff *committed* to giving the best/scariest experience possible.

Still, we've gone twice....total. Just too crowded for me. I can't even imagine what they COULD charge for tickets before they hit equilibrium at maximum revenue before an attendance drop begins to outweigh the price per admission increase. We generally end up doing Busch if we're doing any of the Halloween events (and going early) just because it's generally THAT much less crowded.

And with that....I'll be forced to swim upstream through the horrendous crowds at the Covered Bridge Festival craft fair in 2 weeks.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 7:17 PM

LostKause said:

...if you can afford to go a theme park as expensive as Universal, you can probably afford the extra $20 or $40 for your ticket.

Those parks are outrageously priced to keep the crowds down, which affects those of us who *need* a good deal.

"Dude, you have enough money. Leave the discounts for the needy."

Seriously?

Aww, Travis. I love you, but man...

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Friday, September 23, 2016 10:02 PM

rollergator said:

Lord Gonchar said:

Gonna have to get yourself a Florida ID.

As a bonus, we'll throw in stifling humidity, and even palm trees. Of course, from New Year's until Spring Break, the amusement parks are virtually deserted...

And those are about the only times where the temperature and humidity are bearable ;)

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Friday, September 23, 2016 10:17 PM

Vater said:

Yeah, they're not "outrageously priced" because they offer a top-tier experience or anything.

That too. That is such a well-known idea that I forgot to mention it.

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Friday, September 23, 2016 10:31 PM

Lord Gonchar said:

LostKause said:

...if you can afford to go a theme park as expensive as Universal, you can probably afford the extra $20 or $40 for your ticket.

Those parks are outrageously priced to keep the crowds down, which affects those of us who *need* a good deal.

"Dude, you have enough money. Leave the discounts for the needy."

Seriously?

Aww, Travis. I love you, but man...

I didn't mean it like that. I was including him in the needy person category, because he asked for a discount, so he probably needs a discount. And discounts aren't finite. Everyone who is savvy enough to find a discount can get one.

I didn't think that what I said was that controversial. Universal is an expensive group of parks. I offered my ideas on how he could find discounts that he is eligible for, since the Florida resident thing isn't going to work out for him.

Speaking of which, what is the real reason for a Florida resident discount? I assume it is to gain more frequent business from those who see a Florida theme park visit as being too expensive, even though they live closer.

Last edited by LostKause, Friday, September 23, 2016 10:32 PM
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Friday, September 23, 2016 10:36 PM

LostKause said:

... but if you can afford to go a theme park as expensive as Universal, you can probably afford the extra $20 or $40 for your ticket.

That there. We get people at the theater on occasion who beg for discounts because "it's so expensive" and they're "on a budget" and Chicago "is so expensive", and I always want to say, you're trying to buy tickets to a theater show about three bald blue guys. If you honestly can't afford the cost of tickets, maybe you need to reconsider seeing the show.

And someone who's going to Universal is likely a tourist, spending money on getting to Orlando and spending money on accommodations and spending money on breakfast at the world's largest McDonald's and spending money on tolls and .... just hard for me to buy into the idea that someone who's going to an amusement park is in need of discounted pricing.

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Saturday, September 24, 2016 9:02 AM

rollergator - I totally get the feeling about it being too crowded. Even the first Thursday, which is one of the slowest nights of the event, saw wait times of 100+ minutes for the houses. As a local, I have developed a strategy over the years since I simply love HHN. It doesn't work for many, but it works for me.

I already have an AP - so day admission and parking isn't a concern. I purchase the Sunday-Thursday basic Frequent Fear pass. With AP & FL discounts it was just under 100. I arrive around 4:30pm on event days to avoid the general insanity of the garage and toll booths. I get into USF before the 5pm close and usually snag a quick ride on Mummy before day close. I head to one of the holding areas and then kill time for about an hour. At 5:45ish they walk you to a house (so each visit I do a different holding area) and you usually walk right in. Then from 6-7:30ish you can kind of have the run of the place as the masses enter. Then as it gets dark I will do a lap or two around the park to do the scare zones. And at some point of course pay Bill and Ted a visit. Out the gates by 9pm and there can still be a long line coming in. Home by 9:30 so I can even do it on a work night. I can usually get half of the houses done this way. Rinse and repeat 3 or 4 times during the season.

I get that it doesn't work for most. But it is great for me.

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Monday, September 26, 2016 7:39 PM

slithernoggin said:

We get people at the theater on occasion who beg for discounts because "it's so expensive" and they're "on a budget" and Chicago "is so expensive", and I always want to say, you're trying to buy tickets to a theater show about three bald blue guys. If you honestly can't afford the cost of tickets, maybe you need to reconsider seeing the show.

I would bet that a lot of the people who are "begging" for a discount do not need it. It doesn't cost me anything to ask and you would be surprised at how often asking the simple question ends up saving money. If I can get a lower price simply by asking why would I not do that? Why leave money on the table? The worst that can happen to me is I am told "no" and I become another theater story for you. I cannot speak to the walk-ups but for the people who are calling the box office, I wouldn't be one bit surprised if most of they people that you told "no" to ended up hanging up and then immediately went on-line to buy tickets. A computer cannot give me a discount but a human can.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016 9:56 AM

Shades said:

If I can get a lower price simply by asking why would I not do that? Why leave money on the table?

It's not the people who ask for a discount, and I say no (because, frankly, if you can't take 10 seconds to Google Blue Man Chicago discounts, I'm not inclined to help you; we distribute promotial codes via various ways for a reason) and we complete the sale, that frustrate me.

It's the folks who spend a lot of time asking for a discount for this reason and that reason and this other reason and that other reason, and when I process the payment, they live in a North Shore suburb (around Chicago, that means you have money, and lots of it) or they pull out their black American Express card that, well, annoy me.

And again, if you can't afford to see a show or go to an amusement park or what have you without a discount, maybe you shouldn't be doing that to begin with.

Last edited by slithernoggin, Tuesday, September 27, 2016 9:56 AM
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Tuesday, September 27, 2016 10:56 AM

It annoys me that there are some people who assume other people with a certain address or car or house or credit card are rolling in enough money to pay full price for whatever, and therefore should. And even if they are, who cares? It's not your money and it's not your business what they do with the money that isn't yours.

I agree that if you can't afford something, don't spend money on it. What I don't get is that if I can afford it, I should pay full price even if discounts are available..especially if I own a Bentley. I get that it's annoying if someone badgers you for a discount, but their financial status is irrelevant. That goes for the not well-to-dos, too.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016 11:09 AM

I drive a Tesla but only go to the early, $5 matinee movies. And if you think really hard about it, these things go hand in hand because priorities. What Vater said.

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Tuesday, September 27, 2016 1:01 PM

BrettV said:

As a local, I have developed a strategy over the years since I simply love HHN. It doesn't work for many, but it works for me.

If I were local, I'd be there "at opening" for HHN on many nights, before it becomes a mad-house. The 2-hour drive means there's simply no realistic opportunity during the week, and weekends, well....ya know.

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