Height restrictions

Friday, February 23, 2001 4:36 PM
What does a park do when it can't build any taller? For example, on the Valleyfair! website [www.valleyfair.com], on the Power Tower page, they say it's "only" 275 feet tall because the FAA wouldn't let them build taller. Eventually, Valleyfair! will want to build something taller (like in a few year, after every OTHER park in America has a giga coaster), so what will they do? Ask the FAA to let them build something higher?

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Valleyfair!
The Big Wow!
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Friday, February 23, 2001 4:53 PM
Well, they would have to get special clearance, and I just don't think a park like that will getting anything much higher than Power Tower. I doubt that all parks will have attractions higher than PT.

-Raven_Rider

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"Hold on tight, with all your might, and enjoy your flight on the Raven!"
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:03 PM
When it comes to coasters a tall coaster isn't always a winner. Just look at Custom Coasters.

I think that explains it right there.

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"How you doin?"
-Matt Le Blanc
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:14 PM

What does a park do when it can't build any taller??? Easy... It builds LOWER! Prime example: Alton Towers.
Since that area has a severe height restriction (something like nothing can go over the height of a large tree), they build into the ground...

So if a park has certain height restrictions, you may see a bonus element that may actually enhance the ride rather than restrict it. A diving tunnel where the coaster's first drop goes right into the ground in a tunnel.

For the most part, it works. Good planning is all it takes.
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:16 PM

Well Mike, that doesn't explain it right there.

First off, I HIGHLY doubt that every other park in the world will have giga coaster. Within the next 10 years, I expect to see possibly 8 or 9 counting the two already existing ones.

Anyway, back on topic, if they wanted to build higher than the 275 feet the FAA restricted them to, they would either need to get special FAA clearance like Raven_Rider said, or they would simply just be denied the rights to build it.

If it was a certain length drop they were looking to achive, they could simply do as Buffalo Bills did in Las Vegas with Desparado, and build an underground tunnel.

Hope that answers your question.

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"Shut up brain, or I'll stab you with a Q-tip!"

~From the brilliant mind of Homer J. Simpson.
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:19 PM
My name is IntaminAGFan or you could just call me Link. STOP calling me Mike, you must think I'm someone else!!!

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"How you doin?"
-Matt LeBlanc
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:28 PM
Dude, your crazy.

That's not necessarily a bad thing though:).

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"Shut up brain, or I'll stab you with a Q-tip!"

~From the brilliant mind of Homer J. Simpson.
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Friday, February 23, 2001 7:31 PM
Well, if its an FAA restriction then I am pretty sure you will not make them budge. They have restrictions due to safety. Its not like a local community which creates a height limit on park. They do it for control reasons and the betterment of the community. At least with a community restriction you have the opportunity to have it lifted for a certain ride.
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"SAVING THE WORLD BEFORE BEDTIME" Powerpuff girls
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