Height restrictions?

Tuesday, April 16, 2002 5:09 AM

I know it is a safety thing but why is it that my daughter is tall enough for the Vortex @ PKI but not for the Shockwave @ SFGAm. She's tall enough for T2 @ SFKK, but not for Batman @ SSGAm. Just wondering what are the big differences? We are planning a trip to SFGam and was just dissappointed that she's not gonna be able to ride those. (and Raging Bull)! She's 53" tall!!

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 5:43 AM

Staceyd. I am in the same position you are. My daughter is also around 53" and am hoping she sprouts an inch sometime this summer so she can get on all of the coasters at SFGAm.

As for height restrictions, Batman is a B&M and I am pretty sure that all B&M coasters have a 54" height minimum. Shockwave is also 54" just like the other 2 arrow megaloopers. I guess it has to do with the G's that these type of coasters pull. Most arrow loopers (smaller versions) have a lower height minimum requirement(like Demon which is only 42" to ride). Hope this helped.

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"The Peoples Elbow" or "The Spinaroonie?. Cant decide which is the most electrifying move in sports entertainment!!! LOL

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 6:24 AM
It has to do with the "g's" yes, but also the ergonomics of the restraint system. Different manufacturers have different minimum height requirements according to how the seats and restraints are designed.
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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 6:33 AM

True, the restraint system are generally the limiting factor, but remember they are designed to be SAFE primarily, meaning there is a little "give" in regards to necessary height to be safe. Reality dictates the park has to enforce a guideline uniformly, so they "set the bar" at say, 54". If your child is 53-1/2", a tall pair of shoes will very likely get them through....

Of course, I don't want to *suggest* skirting the rules, 'cause inevitably someone would show up at 50" with tall platform shoes, get by one innatentive ride-op, slip through the restraint, and we'd have a disaster....probably best to wait, give the child something to "grow into"...

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Any resemblance between this post and humor is purely coincidental. No robots were harmed in the filming of this episode...The sarcasm filter default has been left ON for your enjoyment.

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 6:58 AM

Dutchman said:
It has to do with the "g's" yes, but also the ergonomics of the restraint system. Different manufacturers have different minimum height requirements according to how the seats and restraints are designed.

I dont know if thats necessarily the case with Arrow coasters. Like stated above, Shockwave has a 54" minimum where as Demon has a 42" minimum. The restraints are identical and they are both by Arrow so it has to be the difference in intensity between both coasters.

Am I far off base with the above statement? Let me know.

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"The Peoples Elbow" or "The Spinaroonie?. Cant decide which is the most electrifying move in sports entertainment!!! LOL

*** This post was edited by Chitown on 4/16/2002. ***

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 8:39 AM

When Raptor opened, my son was a 1/2 inch too short. He was crushed. So, my husband and I made a special trip to CP to "test" it (this was our first inverted coaster). We both decided that the 1/2 inch wasn't going to make that big a difference. I purchased some Dr. Scholl's heel wedges and insoles. I slipped the wedges into his shoes, then the insoles on top. That lifted him just enough to pass, and his cross trainers were still comfortable. Additionally, if the ride op asked him to take off his shoes (they WERE checking for stuffed tissues inside shoes), all they'd see were the complete insoles.

Was it cheating? Yes. But if I felt in any way that I was putting my child into danger by doing this, I would NOT have done it. That's why we rode it first.

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I'd rather die living than live like I'm dead

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 10:22 AM
It isnt really cheating because they base it on measurements with shoes on. I have seen gym shoes where the bottoms are a good 2 inches thick.

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"The Peoples Elbow" or "The Spinaroonie?. Cant decide which is the most electrifying move in sports entertainment!!! LOL

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 2:05 PM
Its not just on coasters, the height restrictoins are a joke for example; the height for Magnum XL200 is 48in. but for SROS atSFNE it is 54in. The height for Devinces Cradel atBGW is 36in and the same ride at SFNE called Buzzsaw is 54in. thats big difference. Once at CP they wouldn't let my son go on Cedar Downs because he was a quarter of an inch to short . What difference would that make it's just a big marry-go-round that goes a little faster. now it don't matter to me because both my kids are big enough. Ajrides. B&MRULES!!!!!!!!!!
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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 4:00 PM
I have to add that tissues are only good for about an hour, after that they just flatten out. They also get very painful. I never used soles, but thats a good idea. Wish i wouldve thought of that when i was 1/2 " too short for raptor in '94

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HurricaneGeauga- Just in case

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 4:16 PM

Also, if she does grow an inch by the first time you bring her, I'd highly reccomend you have her wear two pairs of socks. One time, I went on B:TR, then a water ride, and tried B:TR again. I shrunk down, so the next two times I went to the park I wore two pairs of socks to keep me from squishing down too much after water rides.

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Webmaster of Travis's Websites of Infinite Boredom!
Less than 2 months until SFGAm opens!

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Tuesday, April 16, 2002 6:53 PM

The height requirements are based on manufacturers recommendations and state regulations. Its the same train, but in a different location.

Second, while toilet paper is funny to hear about, parents, or worse, over zealous 'enthusiasts' who think a ride is safe should think again before thinking they know it all. There are plenty of case studies on accidenst where adults fell out, or off, or were ejected, or whatever happened, and they met an untimely injury or death.

If God forbid something happened, think about the legal ramifications that occurs. If the child is found to be too short, then the park, and possibly the ride crew (usually students trying to make a living) has massive legal issues, not to mention the mental anguish at an early age to deal with. No one here would want their son or daughter to have a fatal story to relive every time they think or see an amusement park.

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