Do B+M inverted Loops seem small and tight ?

Monday, November 4, 2002 1:59 PM

Hello everyone, I am not putting B+M down, i love there rides.I was just wandering if any of you feel like the diameter of B+M loops are very tight and small, becuasee i feel like they are.also do you think they could, ever bigger like on alpengiest, the reason i ask this is because it seems like B+M have small tight loops like arrow, does on there looping coasters. I just think that B+M inverted loops are much more tighter, then that of there standup, floorless, sitdown. Is there a reason why B+M may make there loops on the inverted differnt from those of there sitdown coasters. I hope this makes sense.

Thanks

Wood Fan

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 2:02 PM

Hmm.......I am not sure why but i love it, it gives you that "snap" at the top of the loops, Flatspins and sometimes the barrel roll.

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 2:06 PM
it all depends on what the parks want. if they want high g's in the loops, B&M make loops with high g's. as for the size difference, any loop on an inverted will seem smaller because the ride is designed around the heart line. if you compare a loop on an inverted and a sitdown, the heartline would be in the same place, but because it is below the track on an inverted, the track must have a smaller radius.

-----------------
-Bob (formerly Coaster Jedi)
Do any of you know how to build a sundial out of a pen and a donut?
uh oh, sounds like someone has a case of the mondays.

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 2:07 PM
Have you ridden an invert with a "fat" loop? If not, then how would you know that the loop is too tight?

-------------
I, am nobody, and nobody is pefect!

*** This post was edited by Antuan on 11/4/2002. ***

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 2:09 PM

Some are, some aren't. The Batman ones always seemed tight to me. The one on Alpengeist seemed to be perfect during my visit. I rode Top Gun (Carowinds) this year and it seemed different to me. It looked much more elongated.

Either way, I've never met a B&M Inverted loop I didn't enjoy.

The fattest inverted loop must be these: http://www.coastergallery.com/1999/SFGA4.html

-----------------
- Peabody

*** This post was edited by Peabody on 11/4/2002. ***

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 3:20 PM

SFGA Bob said:
, any loop on an inverted will seem smaller because the ride is designed around the heart line. if you compare a loop on an inverted and a sitdown, the heartline would be in the same place, but because it is below the track on an inverted, the track must have a smaller radius.


Erm, someone please correct me if I'm wrong about this, but the 'heartline' is really only relevant for changes of direction.

Since a loop is executed by going in a straight line - more or less - the 'heartline' is totally irrelevant. They make 'em small because they like him small. The smaller inverts have smaller loops. The taller ones have bigger loops.

-----------------
~~~ Maddy ~~~

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 3:40 PM

Chernabog: SFGA Bob is basicly correct though it isn't necessary to use the term heartline. Just think of where the rider is throughout the loop. Now imagine one set of tracks above his head and another set below his feet. You should be able to understand why the radius of tracks below his beet must be greater than the radius of tracks above his head.

Rides with OTSRs should really be designed around the head and neck, not the heart. It's your head that gets banged around, not your chest.

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 4:12 PM
Peabody, that loop is fat, but is it phat?

-----------------
Is that a Q-bot in your pocket or are you just happy to see me?

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 4:19 PM
That's debatable. :) I didn't dig Deja Vu. Other's love it. To each his own....

-----------------
- Peabody

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 4:51 PM

The slower the coaster, the smaller (shorter) the loops. It's really that simple. And usually, the shorter the coaster (in height), the smaller the loop, unless the loop doesn't come right after the first drop like on most B&M inverted coasters.

Batman: The Ride has pretty small vertical loops, but it's also a pretty short coaster. Talon, on the other hand, has a pretty large loop but is slightly taller than Batman and is of the "newer style" B&M (less forces). Alpengeist and Montu are both very tall inverted coasters, and their vertical loops are very large. As others have said, if you compare the path traveled by the riders of an inverted coaster and a comparable (in speed and height) floorless or sitdown coaster it would be very similar.

-Nate

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 4:53 PM

Personally, i find that the "small and tight" loops bring G's to an unbelievable level. some deliver better than others, and over all, the tighter loops deliver better most of the time.

Raptor, for instance, delivers greatly on its loop, where as alpengeist is somewhat tamer.....just my opinion.

Also, if you think about it, inverts can have tighter loops, where as floorless's, sitdowns, and such cannot. if the loops were too tight on a sitdown, the train *could* collide in with itself, and damage the individual cars. Inverts however, will simply space out, and not collide. This is just what appears obvious to me.

-----------------
#1-MF #2-Apollo's Chariot #3-S:RoS

-Why a car if i could have a coaster train on wheels??

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 5:02 PM

Jim's description is right on, and it's exactly the reason for the look of the interlocked corkscrews on Nemesis Inferno:

Extreme Rides

Now compare that to virtually any of the floorless rides you can think of:

One Click

The difference is just where the track is in relation to the rider. That one click shows this well with the Batman clone in the foreground and Superman in the background (I know they're not similarly sized, but you get the idea).

-----------------
Jeff - Webmaster/Admin - CoasterBuzz.com
"There's nowhere to run, nowhere to hide, when it's all in your mind. You gotta let go." - Ghetto, Supreme Beings of Leisure

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 5:08 PM

Jim Fisher said:

Chernabog: SFGA Bob is basicly correct though it isn't necessary to use the term heartline. Just think of where the rider is throughout the loop. Now imagine one set of tracks above his head and another set below his feet. You should be able to understand why the radius of tracks below his beet must be greater than the radius of tracks above his head.



Well, yes, I get that. But, the diameter of the loop itself is arbitrary. It can be anything B&M wants it to be, assuming that it's safe. That's why I don't see how the rider's position is relevant.

But, yes, again - I understand that if you wanted to 'convert' an invert profile to a 'sit-down' profile, the loop's diameter would increase. But, in the first place, that diameter isn't determined by any other factor that producing the desired forces upon the riders. There's nothing else to it.

-----------------
~~~ Maddy ~~~

+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 7:21 PM
So I guess what we're coming to is that in ENTHUSIAST terms, a "fat loop" would be stretched out, thereby producing lesser g-forces on the rider's body, meaning that it would NOT be "phat". So therefore, for US at least, "smaller is fatter". And you all wonder why I haven't been locked away for my own good....;)
+0
Monday, November 4, 2002 7:25 PM
i love deja vu but it breaks down too much
+0
Tuesday, November 5, 2002 3:50 AM
And there you have it... thank you fancyblue. End of discussion with that succinct statement that encompasses every point that has previously been made.

-----------------

+0
Tuesday, November 5, 2002 9:14 AM

Thank you all for you comments

Wood Fan

+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...