Could a person whos legs been amputated ride? odd

Saturday, July 13, 2002 4:34 PM
Could a person whos legs been amputated ride a rollercoaster like a b&m. They wouldnt be the right height but there body would be big enough. (excluding fakeleggers)

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I hope life isn't a big joke, because I don't get it!


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Saturday, July 13, 2002 4:45 PM
It depeds on how far up they amputated, I'd assume....
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Saturday, July 13, 2002 5:07 PM
Might be difficult on a stand-up...
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Saturday, July 13, 2002 5:18 PM

I've seen a person with only one leg riding Shockwave at PCW (Mondial Top Scan). I would assume that they could ride but it depends on the restraints and how far up the leg has been amputated. On the video that plays on Minebuster (also at PCW) it says that the guest must have "sufficient lower body mass the allow for the proper locking of the restraint device."

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Saturday, July 13, 2002 5:51 PM
i think it would be kind of easy to fall out of the harness all together...
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Saturday, July 13, 2002 5:53 PM

SFOG has the "3/2" rule, which means that a guest must have at least 3 limbs past the second joint (elbow, knee). So if a guest had both legs amputated below the knee, or if they were missing an entire leg (assuming both arms are still there) they would be allowed to ride. It's more of a park policy issue than a manufacturer issue.

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Saturday, July 13, 2002 5:56 PM
What if it was a flyer?
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Saturday, July 13, 2002 9:52 PM

At CP we had "green sheets" that told us all of the disability information for a particular ride. It was worded like "Rider must have at least one arm and one leg in order to safely ride. Rider must be mentally capable to hold onto the lap bar". I sometimes would refer to it when I was asked if it was safe for someone who was dissabled to ride. each ride was different.

I am so very glad that the info was provided because it definately saved me from an embarrassing situation while holding the guest up and waiting for a lead or silver tag to show up.

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Saturday, July 13, 2002 9:58 PM

Well I'm sure as long as the restraints an hold them than they are fine, I'm sure alot of amputees would not be at a theme park though.

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Can we change the name of Top Gun to your mom so no one wants to ride your mom?

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Sunday, July 14, 2002 6:59 AM
I dont think people with both legs amputated are allowed to ride bacause, I once was in line for batman and a Man missing both of his legs who looked to be the right upperbody build for the ride was not allowed to ride. I think that they still have to meet the minimum hight requirement to ride.
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Sunday, July 14, 2002 7:15 AM
While waiting in the queue for the PNE Coaster a couple years ago ,I saw a man with both legs amputated ride Coaster. They let hime stay on the ride for a couple of curcuits. What is more amazing is is he rode in the last seat of the train where you get major airtime. Coaster has minimal restaints,only a lap bar.This man could have very easily been ejected from the ride.

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I can fix anything.....where is the duct tape?

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Sunday, July 14, 2002 3:18 PM
I pretty sure the rules are the same throughout all SF parks but in SFDL, you must have at least one arm and one leg to ride.

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Six Flags Darien Lake Ultimate Guide
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Sunday, July 14, 2002 3:26 PM
I've seen someone on Big Bad Wolf ride with 1 leg. I don't think if you didn't have 1 leg and 1 arm it would matter but I think if you didn't have 2 legs or 2 arms then it would be a problem because you would be too short if you had no legs and if you had no arms you couldn't hold anything.

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Sean

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Monday, July 15, 2002 9:37 AM

If just thought of something...

Think about the water "dummies" they use to test rides. They have no arms and little leg.

http://www.coasterforce.com/images2/silvertrains.jpg

So if the "dummies" can ride technically so could a person - but it's up to the parks to decide.

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Monday, July 15, 2002 9:51 AM

Canadas Coaster Drew said:

If just thought of something...

Think about the water "dummies" they use to test rides. They have no arms and little leg.

http://www.coasterforce.com/images2/silvertrains.jpg

So if the "dummies" can ride technically so could a person - but it's up to the parks to decide.



Dummies are almost always restrained by additional means other than the restraints (bungees, straps, etc), because where the weight is carried would eject them from the ride if only the rides restraints were used (it has to do with the where the center of gravity of the "dummies", and that they're only designed primarily to simulate the weight of riders on a train, not specifically to be bale to be held in by the ride's restraint system.)

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Monday, July 15, 2002 9:53 AM
yea Drew, but the water dummies are: 1) rigid and unable to flex at the "waist" limiting the possibility f slipping out of the restraints 2) unable to sue the park if they fall out mid-run.

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Posting, "Me too" like some brain dead AOLer. I ought to to the world a favor, and cap you like old yeller...

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Monday, July 15, 2002 9:57 AM

Apollo's Chariot's spiel specifically states that people with prosthetic limbs may not ride...just thought that was odd :)

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No love for the whiners

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Monday, July 15, 2002 9:59 AM

Of course they can ride.... within limits.

Standups require that the person be able to stand and walk of their own free will.

However most coasters have special seats and restraints designed for such circumstances.

I.E. Beast has a special upper body restraint that gets used from time to time. If you look at the back seat of car # 3 (I believe) there are what appears to be seat belt latches on the back wall of the car (unload side.) Those are actually two of the clips that help secure the upper body harness. Imagine a life vest (minus the padding) where the shoulders have adjustable belts on eather side that clip to these latches on the back of the train. At the bottom, there is a strap that basically hangs in the crotch area that then hooks to a latch under the seat that the rider clips. Then the lap bar is lowered for extra restraint.

Shaggy

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Shaggy
A.K.A. John K.

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Monday, July 15, 2002 10:02 AM
The problem I see involves a ride evacuation. What if the ride has to be evacuated from the lift, a trim station, or somewhere along the course?
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Monday, July 15, 2002 10:11 AM

Typically parks require that only one handicapped person be riding at a time. Meaning that even on a coaster with three train operation only one handicapped person can be riding.... period. Now obviously that rule gets "bent" from time to time, but for the most part it eliminates such situations.

If a handicapped person is on a ride when it stops and it must be evacuated, then they would be removed the good old fashioned way.

Let me throw in the fact that coaster evacuations are a "last resort" situation. Basically, rides are not evacuated unless the ride does not have the potential for re-opening in an acceptable time period, or if re-opening requires a state of unsecure operation. (What I mean is, if the ride requires a full safety check after any period of closure, before it can operate with riders.) Whether or not the rider is handicapped, said evacuations are tricky, time-consuming and dangerous. The same safety in evacuations must be taken with the guest regardless of their physical state.

In my 3 seasons of rider operations, I can count on my one hand the number of evacs I was involved with.

Shaggy

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Shaggy
A.K.A. John K.

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