Coaster build, design ?s, operation ?s

Wednesday, August 22, 2001 3:28 PM
Sorry - lots of questions. Hopefully you can answer all of them!
How does a park notify a coaster-designing company that they want a roller coaster? How is the ride paid for (check? funds transfer?)? How does the coaster company determine how to design the ride so it fits in the park? What are the steps in the design process? After the ride is designed, does the design company manufacture the pieces, or does the company have an outside company do it? How are the pieces of the ride shipped from the manufacturing location to the park? Who builds the coaster?
When a new coaster company starts up, how does it get parks to choose that company for the park's rides?
How does "transfer track" work?
Thank you for your help! (And yes, I searched for the answers to these questions BEFORE posting!)

*** This post was edited by HarKarVolBasTre on 8/22/2001. ***

+0
Wednesday, August 22, 2001 5:09 PM
How does a park notify a coaster-designing company that they want a roller coaster?

Most likely they call them up and say we want X ride...don't know that one.

How is the ride paid for (check? funds transfer?)?

I'm guessing it is either in a direct funds transfer or some sort of cashier's check.

How does the coaster company determine how to design the ride so it fits in the park?

Most likely the first step is to survey the land that they want to use, using very expensive surveying computer equipment...etc.

What are the steps in the design process?

They first create the design either with cad programs....or some companies use spreadsheets that have all the data.

After the ride is designed, does the design company manufacture the pieces, or does the company have an outside company do it?

It depends on the company, some companies do it in-house (Morgan Manufactoring is one I know)...while some contract out.  Also...with a wooden coaster a lot of this work is done in the field (building the frame).

How are the pieces of the ride shipped from the manufacturing location to the park?

Most likely in shipping crates via truck/plane/boat...don't really know.

Who builds the coaster?

Most parks have local crews with supervisors from the actual company.  Many times its the same (Cedar Point has used the same people for many years, if I recall correctly).

When a new coaster company starts up, how does it get parks to choose that company for the park's rides?

I'm guessing at IAAPA, or by sending out detailed information to the parks.  Some parks also make prototypes to show to the parks.

How does "transfer track" work?

The train(s) sit on the transfer track until they are ready to be placed on.  Then 1 (2,3,4?) cars are detached from the train and then the track slides over...cars moved up...then the rest moves over and is put together. :)

Hope that helped...maybe some people that know the other answers could help fill in.  Also something else..if you have access to the Discovery Channel....the show "Making of a Coaster" helps with a lot of this information.

+0
Wednesday, August 22, 2001 6:32 PM
This is just from watching the making of a coaster so it ight not be 100% accurate. 

1.  They usually do what fornoth said, they call up or send a letter to different companies and tell them that they would like them to design whatever ride.

2.  I think they might pay for them by the park's income.  They may take out X amount of dollars out of what the park makes a year or previous years.

3.  They send the company a topographical map of the park so they can see the land elevations.  They also probably send them something like a Terraserver overhead picture of the park.  And they also do serveying of the land at the park.

4.  They do a rough design of what they want the ride to look like.  Then they do computer models using different CAD programs and other programs the tell what the g-forces are throughout all the segments of the ride.

5.  Well if its a company like organ then the design company does it themselves, but if its someone like B&M then they contact other manufacturers to build the parts to the ride.

6.  Depends upon where the manufacterer is, if its across seas, then they use boats, and then put them on to a truck once the boats arrive to the country.  But if its in the same country, then they just use trucks.

7.  The park hires certain construction crews to assemble the ride.

8.  Different conventions and probably doing marketing campaigns.

9.  same as fornoth, yes i have repeated some of his answers but we both can help you out.

-----------------

+0
Thursday, August 23, 2001 8:49 PM
I don't know of any type of transfer track where the train is "detatched".Unless you mean prior to the ride's operation. have seen a few variations of it though. (i'll relate them to the coasters i have seen them on

= Space Mtn. DL (front transfer) and BTMR - transfer track is small section of track that has two sections of track slightly angled to the other. Depending on which direction you want the train to go, those small sections are turned (they sit on a turntable) until it lines up with the next piece of track. The train is released./P>
P>FONT style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #b8b8b8">2.) Space Mtn. Paris and other Vekomas - transfer track is small section like above but the other track piece is UNDER the first. When its time for a switch the whole piece is "flipped" so now was on the bottom is now on top. train is released. This system is used on the Disney monorail system for track switches.


= Space Mtn. DL (back transfer), Arrows, B&M's and many others - transfer track consists of the entire breakrun (on smaller coasters) or holding break section. some cases have this whole section move over simutaneously with the piece next to it. once its locked into place the train is released as it can function as a break run. other places have just one "moving section" (like X and Goliath) and three storage areas. The moving section is part of the break run so once it has added or subtracted a train it must move back into place. (GASM at SFGAv has two moving sections).

=Intamins - Small section of track moves with a curvy portion of track so that the curvy portion lines up with the main track. The train is released, but the sections must move back to continue operation


= This one is the most unique one 've ever seen Arrow's Pepsi Max Big One - this ride puts the trains below the station. When its time to add a train the whole station track raises till the section under it locks on to the main track. the train is released. 'm not sure if the track goes back down though

there are other variations as for storage areas like on older arrows how the trains "dive" into an area under the station for maintenace, but thats not transfer track./P>

*** This post was edited by baddboy on 8/24/2001. ***

+0
Thursday, August 23, 2001 9:00 PM
For the transfer track on Shockwave (and I'm sure the other 2 Arrow megalooper triplets) all of the trains go around the track empty, until one is stopped in the station, and the other 2 on the brake runs (accually, I wasn't paying attention, but one might be stopped on the midcourse, also. I don't know if the final brake run is long enough to have 2 blocks.)

Then train which is to be removed is slowly rolled out of the station on train length, immediatly before it would dip down, turn, and climb the lift. That whole section of track the begins moving to the right to one of the 3 side tracks, and the train is then rolled backwards onto it. The movable track is then moved left where it then realigns with the main circut. The reverse is done to put a train on the track (well, it doesn't take a genius to figure that out.)

It is an interesting experience to watch, but you only need to see it once. I have been in the station when they did this once, but I have no desire to watch it again. It is a slow process, and makes you sit there and wait for them to finish the job, all while watching a few empty trains go in and out of the station.

-----------------
Hey, SFGAm management, can I buy a couple cages of Sky Whirl?

+0
Saturday, August 25, 2001 7:38 AM
Dont forget the block checks. In addition to running the trains around a few times. Each time a train is added you still have to complete a sysytem of block checks to make sure that the trains will stop in thier prospective locations.
+0

You must be logged in to post

POP Forums - ©2018, POP World Media, LLC
Loading...